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Random News
Antibes · 1 year ago

A new law was introduced in Russia that lets Putin send anyone who insults him online to jail. The law aims to prevent “fake news”.


Random News
Antibes · 1 year ago
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The Week UK
London, United Kingdom · 14 hours ago
Instant Opinion: Keir Starmer must offer more than ‘not being Jeremy Corbyn’
Your guide to the best columns and commentary on Monday 13 July Reaction The Week Staff Monday, July 13, 2020 - 2:20pm The Week’s daily round-up highlights the five best opinion pieces from across the British and international media, with excerpts from each. 1. Tom Harris in The Daily Telegraph on the first 100 days of the Labour leader After 100 days, Keir Starmer needs to offer voters more than ‘not being Jeremy Corbyn’ “The improvements he has made to his party’s – and his own – standing are real and important. That he has made mistakes along the way should hardly surprise anyone, although he needs to make fewer of them if he is to establish himself as a natural repository of anti-government support. Electorates have a nasty habit of making judgments about politicians in the very first few weeks of their tenure, and then refusing to reverse that judgment. The Covid lockdown may have given Starmer a longer period to bed in and might even allow him to have an effective relaunch on the other side of this crisis. From the perspective of a former member, Starmer represents a breath of fresh air for most Labour supporters after five fraught years. But a sense of relief won’t be enough for all those red wall voters, because – and I speak from experience – once you get out of the habit of voting Labour, it’s harder than you might expect to get back into it.” 2. Nesrine Malik in The Guardian in defence of those decried as ‘online mobs’ The ‘cancel culture’ war is really about old elites losing power in the social media age See related What is cancel culture? “Whenever I talk to people who are suddenly concerned about ‘cancel culture’ or ‘online mobs’, my first thought is always: ‘Where have you been for the last decade?’ I’ve been online long enough and, like many others, been receiving criticism and abuse online for long enough, to know that what some see as a new pattern of virtual censure by moral purists is mostly a story about the internet, not ideology or identity. If critics of ‘cancel culture’ are worried about opinions, posts and writings being constantly patrolled by a growing group of haters, then I am afraid they are extremely late to the party. I cannot remember a time where I have written or posted anything without thinking: ‘How many ways can this possibly be misconstrued, and can I defend it if it were?’ It’s not even a conscious thought process now, it’s instinct.” 3. Sean O’Grady in The Independent on the recovery of the British economy Forget global Britain - thanks to Brexit, coronavirus and a trade war with China, we’re losing our grip “There’s something heroic about Britain trying to chuck its weight around this way, and of course no one wants to do business with bullies and tyrants. But still, if the British economy is going to recover from the coronavirus-induced recession and go on to grow in the 2020s it will need its friends and its markets, and the British now seem to intent on blanking virtually everyone. The opportunities seem to be contracting rather than expanding. As everyone agrees, the UK is a great trading nation, and since before the industrial revolution has made its living from selling abroad, but the we don’t seem to be living up to the original hopes of ‘unleashing Britain’s potential’.” 4. John Prideaux, US editor of The Economist, in The Times on an abolitionist deserving of a pedestal A slavery statue we can all agree on: Frederick Douglass “On both sides of the Atlantic a great debate about statues is under way. So far the focus has mostly been on which lumps of bronze and marble should be removed by crane, or pushed into the harbour. There has been less discussion of what to do with all the empty plinths this creates. Yet putting up statues is fun. It is an opportunity to honour someone who should be universally admired and, therefore, to make a statement about what the society doing the putting up values. For those reasons Britain ought to have a statue of America’s greatest campaigner for the abolition of slavery, Frederick Douglass. Douglass had such an extraordinary life that the three autobiographies he wrote hardly seem sufficient.” 5. Nick Akerman, an assistant special prosecutor on the Watergate Special Prosecution Force, in The New York Times on the unfair fight set up for the special prosecutor Did Mueller Ever Stand a Chance Against Trump and Roger Stone? “From the start, Mr. Mueller was restrained by Justice Department regulations. He was barred, for example, from looking into the broader relationship between Mr. Trump and Russia through a review of Mr. Trump’s financial records and tax returns. Furthermore, according to the Mueller report, Mr. Trump made multiple attempts to fire the special counsel, and it is difficult, if not almost impossible, to conduct an investigation under those circumstances... Looking ahead, there needs to be a better mechanism in extraordinary circumstances - like Watergate and Russian interference in the 2016 election - that allows for the appointment of a truly independent special prosecutor. We were lucky to get the Mueller report, but Mr. Mueller was acting under restraints. Unfortunately history tells us that we will need special counsels in the years ahead, under extraordinary circumstances, and like we did with Watergate, that office should have true independence to protect our country and Constitution.” UK News US Russia Crime Science & Health Politics Society Law Keir Starmer Jeremy Corbyn Social media Boris Johnson Brexit slavery Donald Trump Russia US election 2016#world_news
Anna
Antibes, France · 1 year ago
Today I had to go to the post office to mail a contract cancellation letter for my gym membership. So I went there and was walking all over the place to find an entrance. When I finally gave up and was leaving the place, I saw people walking to this door. So in case anyone needs to go there, the entrance is far far in the right corner probably blocked by all the cars that are parked there
Zara Mcgrath
Antibes, France · 1 year ago
Anyone want to tutor me in math? I pay well
Nico Kvara
Antibes, France · 1 year ago
China 🇨🇳 is seriously considering a new law that would ban cryptocurrency mining.
Book Club
Antibes, France · 1 year ago
The world’s largest rare book & manuscript 📜 library has no windows - bus still allows sunlight in ☀️ The walls are made from thin marble pannels that filter daylight. The pannels let in just enough natural light to read without harming the books. The Beinecke library is on the Yale University Campus. One of the rarest books kept there is the Gutenberg Bible, from 1445. The Beinecke special collection has 180,000 books📚. These books are stored in a central glass tower, with 6 floors. The glass is airtight to protect the fragile books kept inside. The library was designed by Gordon Bunshaft and completed in 1963. Source: World Economic Forum - book club Images: Beinecke library
The Week UK
London, United Kingdom · 2 days ago
Instant Opinion: the year is 2022 - so ‘what does life look like’?
Credits Tomohiro Ohsumi/Getty Images Your guide to the best columns and commentary on Friday 10 July Reaction The Week Staff Friday, July 10, 2020 - 12:08pm The Week’s daily round-up highlights the five best opinion pieces from across the British and international media, with excerpts from each. 1. David Leonhardt in The New York Times on the post-coronavirus future It’s 2022. What Does Life Look Like? “It’s 2022, and the coronavirus has at long last been defeated. After a miserable year-and-a-half, alternating between lockdowns and new outbreaks, life can finally begin returning to normal. But it will not be the old normal. It will be a new world, with a reshaped economy, much as war and depression reordered life for previous generations. Thousands of stores and companies that were vulnerable before the virus arrived have disappeared. Dozens of colleges are shutting down, in the first wave of closures in the history of American higher education. People have also changed long-held patterns of behavior: Outdoor socializing is in, business trips are out. And American politics — while still divided in many of the same ways it was before the virus — has entered a new era. All of this, obviously, is conjecture. The future is unknowable. But the pandemic increasingly looks like one of the defining events of our time.” 2. Billy Bragg, musician and activist, in The Guardian on how speech is only free when everyone has a voice ‘Cancel culture’ doesn’t stifle debate, but it does challenge the old order See related Cartoon characters could be banned from junk food London Underground to consider ban on junk food adverts Children's online junk food ads banned by watchdog “The ability of middle-aged gatekeepers to control the agenda has been usurped by a new generation of activists who can spread information through their own networks, allowing them to challenge narratives promoted by the status quo. The great progressive movements of the 21st century have sprung from these networks: Black Lives Matter; #MeToo; Extinction Rebellion. While they may seem disparate in their aims, what they have in common is a demand for accountability. Although free speech remains the fundamental bedrock of a free society, for everyone to enjoy the benefits of freedom, liberty needs to be tempered by two further dimensions: equality and accountability. Without equality, those in power will use their freedom of expression to abuse and marginalise others. Without accountability, liberty can mutate into the most dangerous of all freedoms – impunity.” 3. Iain Martin in The Times on Rishi’s rapid rise Sunak’s road to No 10 gets bumpy from here “It is already possible to see how at some future critical moment in this pandemic, or when there is an electoral reverse or constitutional crisis, Mr Johnson could become the latest victim of Conservative Party ruthlessness. There are pitfalls for the chancellor, though. Mr Johnson is dangerously competitive. Soon, it will also be possible for opponents to label the chancellor Mr Unemployment. Often the Tory frontrunner doesn’t win and for all the spin that everything is lovely between Nos 10 and 11 right now, it won’t always be. A small but vicious band of Johnson ultra-loyalists will defend their man and their power. All that fun is to come. But it is worth pausing for a moment to admire the manner in which someone who just a year ago was serving as parliamentary under-secretary of state for local government rose to become the likely next prime minister.” 4. John T Bennett in The Independent on a president losing grip at the worst possible time I’ve documented Trump every day of his presidency — and now he’s in free-fall “The more Trump follows his instincts, the further he seems to fall. He has stumbled before during his term. But after watching every day of his presidency since he was sworn in on that grey day in January 2017, this correspondent sees a president in free-fall. He has no message for voters on why they should hand him a second term. His potential legal problems mounted Thursday when the Supreme Court ruled his office does not grant him automatic immunity from a Manhattan district attorney’s subpoena seeking his tax and financial records. His poll numbers are dismal. The virus is spreading again like wildfire. On issues from wearing masks to guard against Covid-carrying droplets ejected from our fellow humans to flying the Confederate flag to whether coronavirus is even that serious to the real state of the virus-hobbled economy, Trump’s know-it-all approach to life leaves him more and more isolated.” 5. Fraser Nelson in The Daily Telegraph on an obscured truth about Britain’s care chaos The real story behind Britain’s Covid care home crisis isn’t what you think “Care homes argue, still, that their business model depends on being able to pay people less than supermarkets do. Their complaint about Brexit, even now, is that it makes it harder for them to import cheap labour and keep wages down. Their bigger concern should be what the Covid crisis has shown about their ability to protect those in their care. Deciding what to do about care homes is, we’re told, high up on Boris Johnson’s list – but the more important point is what lessons can be learned now. If there is to be a second wave of Covid, it’s pretty clear what ought to happen: care home workers should be isolated and put up in a hotel if needs be. And – needless to say – forbidden from working from multiple homes. It will cost, but looking after the elderly can’t be done on the cheap. The last few months have proved, yet again, the real price of low-cost care.” UK News US Media Science & Health Politics Society Coronavirus Covid-19 Free speech Rishi Sunak Boris Johnson 10 Downing Street Donald Trump 2020 US election care homes#world_news
Zara Mcgrath
Antibes, France · 1 year ago
Who wants to make me a cocktail?
Tata Kvara
Tbilisi, Georgia · 1 year ago
“If you haven't yet decided where to spend your summer vacation, let me recommend visiting Georgia and give you just a few (out of MANY) reasons why: 1. It's cheap! Traveling here, especially with Dollars or Euros, you will feel like a king! to give you an example: a cab ride within most parts of the city center are around 2-3 Dollars! 2. It's beautiful and diverse! No matter what you are into: nature, hiking/camping, historical sights, if you love the mountains or the sea, vibrant city, or intimate village life, you can experience it all here! And since everything is so close, you don't have to choose! 3. The food and wine is amazing! If you make decisions with your stomach, well, this is the place for you. As the cradle of wine, you can taste over 8000 years of wine-making tradition, along with our diverse, delicious choice of traditional and fusion dishes. 4. If you love music and a good time: If you are into electronic music, love festivals and the club scene, well good news: Tbilisi is the New Berlin! Check out our world-renowned club Bassiani or attend the ECOWAVES Festival by the sea! 5. If you will go to great extents to capture that perfect Instagram pic, look no further! you will find thousands of picture perfect instagramable places to create your next, original story/post. 6. And last, but not least: If you like standing up to dictators and bullies and like being part of a good cause, if you believe in democracy and human rights and like rooting for the underdog: As you may have heard, 20% of Georgia has been occupied by Russia since the 2008 war. In the midst of rising tensions, Russian president Putin has blocked flights from Russia to Georgia with the aim of crippling our economy, which largely thrives on tourism, especially Russian tourists. By visiting Georgia you'll not only have a wonderful, memorable trip, but will succeed in fighting back an oppressive, backward, fucked up regime.” Please share to spread the word!
Giorgi Gvajaia
Tbilisi, Georgia · 1 year ago
Automaker Daimler Says It Has No Idea How Kim Jong Un Got Hold of Its Armored Limos.🤔Read more 👇🏻 (TOKYO) — German automaker Daimler, which makes armored limousines used by North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, says it has no idea where he got them and has no business dealings with the North. Kim has raised eyebrows by using Daimler-branded stretch limousines at several very high-profile summits, including his meeting this week with Russian President Vladimir Putin and both of his earlier summits with President Donald Trump. The sale of luxury goods, including limousines, is banned under U. N. sanctions intended to put pressure on North Korea to abandon its nuclear weapons. Kim nevertheless had two limos waiting for him at Vladivostok station — a Mercedes Maybach S600 Pullman Guard and a Mercedes Maybach S62. He is believed to have also used the S600 Pullman Guard for his summits with Trump in Singapore in June last year and in Hanoi in February. “We have absolutely no idea how those vehicles were delivered to North Korea,” Daimler spokeswoman Silke Mockert said in a written response to an Associated Press report Wednesday on the limousines . “For Daimler, the correct export of products in conformance with the law is a fundamental principle of responsible entrepreneurial activity.” Daimler, based in Stuttgart, Germany, is one of the world’s biggest and more prestigious automobile companies. It is one of the biggest providers of high-end passenger cars and the world’s largest producer of trucks above 6 tons. On its home page, the multinational giant boasts of selling vehicles and services in nearly all the countries of the world and of having production facilities in Europe, North and South America, Asia and Africa. North Korea, however, isn’t one of its official customers. “Our company has had no business connections with North Korea for far more than 15 years now and strictly complies with E.U. and U.S. embargoes,” she said. “To prevent deliveries to North Korea and to any of its embassies worldwide, Daimler has implemented a comprehensive export control process. Sales of vehicles by third parties, especially of used vehicles, are beyond our control and responsibility.” Kim’s ability to procure the limousines anyway is a good example of how porous the international sanctions tend to be. According to Daimler, the Mercedes-Benz Pullman limousines offer their passengers “a superbly appointed setting for discreet meetings.” The version used by Kim is believed to be equipped with all the key communications and entertainment systems so that, according to a company description of the car, its occupants can remain “fully in touch with the rest of the world while enjoying the luxury and comfort of their own very special place in it.”
The Guardian UK
London, United Kingdom · 2 days ago
Roger Stone has escaped punishment for his crimes. Trump is sending a signal | Andrew Gawthorpe
By commuting Stone’s sentence, Trump is telling others who might commit crimes on his behalf that he’s got their backAt America’s birth, when delegates in Virginia were debating whether to ratify the Constitution, a politician called George Mason had an objection. Mason, who was influential over the development of the Bill of Rights, wondered whether the presidential pardon power was too broad. Might not the president encourage people who worked for him to commit crimes, and then pardon them? If he could, there would be essentially no check on a president’s power to break the law. Given that sort of leeway, an unscrupulous president could “establish a monarchy, and destroy the republic.”Mason’s objection ought to concern us still today. Late on Friday, Donald Trump commuted the prison sentence of his long-time associate Roger Stone, all but guaranteeing that Stone will never face justice for crimes he committed while obstructing an investigation into the Trump campaign’s links with WikiLeaks and the Russian intelligence agencies who attempted to tip the 2016 election in Trump’s favor. Backlash to the decision has been swift, with Trump’s fellow Republican Mitt Romney condemning the president’s “unprecedented, historic corruption”. Continue reading...#roger_stone#us_politics#donald_trump #law#law_(us)#robert_mueller