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Tin Tin
Tbilisi · 8 months ago

თბილისი

ოქტომბერი, 2016

მამა-შვილი 😊😊

"A father is someone you look up to no matter how tall you grow."


Tin Tin
Tbilisi · 8 months ago
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The Week UK
London, United Kingdom · 11 hours ago
Instant Opinion: Keir Starmer must offer more than ‘not being Jeremy Corbyn’
Your guide to the best columns and commentary on Monday 13 July Reaction The Week Staff Monday, July 13, 2020 - 2:20pm The Week’s daily round-up highlights the five best opinion pieces from across the British and international media, with excerpts from each. 1. Tom Harris in The Daily Telegraph on the first 100 days of the Labour leader After 100 days, Keir Starmer needs to offer voters more than ‘not being Jeremy Corbyn’ “The improvements he has made to his party’s – and his own – standing are real and important. That he has made mistakes along the way should hardly surprise anyone, although he needs to make fewer of them if he is to establish himself as a natural repository of anti-government support. Electorates have a nasty habit of making judgments about politicians in the very first few weeks of their tenure, and then refusing to reverse that judgment. The Covid lockdown may have given Starmer a longer period to bed in and might even allow him to have an effective relaunch on the other side of this crisis. From the perspective of a former member, Starmer represents a breath of fresh air for most Labour supporters after five fraught years. But a sense of relief won’t be enough for all those red wall voters, because – and I speak from experience – once you get out of the habit of voting Labour, it’s harder than you might expect to get back into it.” 2. Nesrine Malik in The Guardian in defence of those decried as ‘online mobs’ The ‘cancel culture’ war is really about old elites losing power in the social media age See related What is cancel culture? “Whenever I talk to people who are suddenly concerned about ‘cancel culture’ or ‘online mobs’, my first thought is always: ‘Where have you been for the last decade?’ I’ve been online long enough and, like many others, been receiving criticism and abuse online for long enough, to know that what some see as a new pattern of virtual censure by moral purists is mostly a story about the internet, not ideology or identity. If critics of ‘cancel culture’ are worried about opinions, posts and writings being constantly patrolled by a growing group of haters, then I am afraid they are extremely late to the party. I cannot remember a time where I have written or posted anything without thinking: ‘How many ways can this possibly be misconstrued, and can I defend it if it were?’ It’s not even a conscious thought process now, it’s instinct.” 3. Sean O’Grady in The Independent on the recovery of the British economy Forget global Britain - thanks to Brexit, coronavirus and a trade war with China, we’re losing our grip “There’s something heroic about Britain trying to chuck its weight around this way, and of course no one wants to do business with bullies and tyrants. But still, if the British economy is going to recover from the coronavirus-induced recession and go on to grow in the 2020s it will need its friends and its markets, and the British now seem to intent on blanking virtually everyone. The opportunities seem to be contracting rather than expanding. 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For those reasons Britain ought to have a statue of America’s greatest campaigner for the abolition of slavery, Frederick Douglass. Douglass had such an extraordinary life that the three autobiographies he wrote hardly seem sufficient.” 5. Nick Akerman, an assistant special prosecutor on the Watergate Special Prosecution Force, in The New York Times on the unfair fight set up for the special prosecutor Did Mueller Ever Stand a Chance Against Trump and Roger Stone? “From the start, Mr. Mueller was restrained by Justice Department regulations. He was barred, for example, from looking into the broader relationship between Mr. Trump and Russia through a review of Mr. Trump’s financial records and tax returns. Furthermore, according to the Mueller report, Mr. Trump made multiple attempts to fire the special counsel, and it is difficult, if not almost impossible, to conduct an investigation under those circumstances... Looking ahead, there needs to be a better mechanism in extraordinary circumstances - like Watergate and Russian interference in the 2016 election - that allows for the appointment of a truly independent special prosecutor. We were lucky to get the Mueller report, but Mr. Mueller was acting under restraints. Unfortunately history tells us that we will need special counsels in the years ahead, under extraordinary circumstances, and like we did with Watergate, that office should have true independence to protect our country and Constitution.” UK News US Russia Crime Science & Health Politics Society Law Keir Starmer Jeremy Corbyn Social media Boris Johnson Brexit slavery Donald Trump Russia US election 2016#world_news
The Week UK
London, United Kingdom · 2 days ago
Instant Opinion: the year is 2022 - so ‘what does life look like’?
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People have also changed long-held patterns of behavior: Outdoor socializing is in, business trips are out. And American politics — while still divided in many of the same ways it was before the virus — has entered a new era. All of this, obviously, is conjecture. The future is unknowable. But the pandemic increasingly looks like one of the defining events of our time.” 2. Billy Bragg, musician and activist, in The Guardian on how speech is only free when everyone has a voice ‘Cancel culture’ doesn’t stifle debate, but it does challenge the old order See related Cartoon characters could be banned from junk food London Underground to consider ban on junk food adverts Children's online junk food ads banned by watchdog “The ability of middle-aged gatekeepers to control the agenda has been usurped by a new generation of activists who can spread information through their own networks, allowing them to challenge narratives promoted by the status quo. 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The Guardian UK
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The Guardian UK
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Giorgi Gvajaia
Tbilisi, Georgia · 1 year ago
Here's why Galaxy Fold displays are already failing There are two distinct issues here, and only one is particularly fixable. Read more 👇🏻 Problem 1: The screen's plastic covering looks removable This is the "fixable" problem. The Galaxy Fold, as every other foldable phone, has a plastic display on top of the OLED display that allows the entire screen to flex. We don't yet have flexible glass, so this is just how things are going to have to be for the foreseeable future. But the problem with that top layer on the Galaxy Fold is that it looks exactly like a pre-installed screen protector we've seen on phone after phone — including the Galaxy S10 — that you have the option of removing. On the Fold, though, the layer is not designed to be removed. It's not just inadvisable to do so, it's not meant to be removable. If you remove that top layer, you've effectively done the same as removing the cover glass from your Galaxy S10 — and, at that point, the display panel itself is going to fail. And it won't take long to do so. Samsung's messaging to early reviewers explicitly reminded us that the top layer of the screen was not removable and that it would compromise the integrity of the display. But even still, the urge to remove that top layer has been ingrained in all of us for over a decade — plastic doesn't feel right on a phone, and it looks like it's removable. Even some of the most egregious offenders of pre-installed screen protectors in the past would still technically allow you to remove the protector and have the phone work properly afterward. This just isn't the same case, even though it feels the same at first. So this part of the problem is fixable, but we don't know what Samsung plans to do about it. Let's remember that the Galaxy Fold is already up for pre-order, and will be shipping to regular consumers (albeit not in large numbers) with no hand-holding or extra information. They'll just get a phone in a box, and in the case of our retail-ready boxes there was not a single warning on the phone or packaging that mentioned you should not remove this top film. Pair that up with the intense desire to want to peel plastic from new phones, and you're set up for a bad news cycle of broken Galaxy Fold screens. Thankfully, proper retail boxes are supposed to have a small warning on the protective film covering the entire phone out of the box. And for as interesting of a news story it is for reviewers to see broken screens, customers that paid $2000 will take this a bit more seriously. It would behoove Samsung to make changes to its packaging and software to make it explicit as possible that the plastic should not be removed like any other phone — a single warning on the piece of plastic that people hastily rip off of every phone really isn't enough when the consequences are this serious. Problem 2: The screen is just fragile, period This is the bigger issue that Samsung inherently can't "fix" without years more development of the display technology that enables these phones to fold over and over again. So you shouldn't remove the top layer of the Galaxy Fold's display. We know this. But the fact that you can remove it (if you try hard enough) and simply doing that is enough to completely render the display useless and quickly broken is a bad sign. At least two of the reports of failed displays came while the Galaxy Fold's top layer was kept in place and undamaged, which points to the larger discussion of just how fragile the display technology is no matter what you do. Should this keep you from buying a Galaxy Fold?🤔 There are many reasons why you should be skeptical of parting with $2000 to buy a Galaxy Fold, well before any of these reports of screen failures arose. The durability and longevity of a flexible display was always going to be in question on these first-generation consumer foldable devices — we just didn't necessarily expect to see it start so spectacularly or so early. If you were hyped enough about the Galaxy Fold to want to place a pre-order, or at least see it in stores at the end of April before potentially buying, it would be a good idea to remind yourself of all of these sorts of problems that can be associated with a device that introduces a brand new form factor and so many new technologies. The Galaxy Fold is not a normal phone, and it's truly pushing the envelope in ways that we haven't seen in years; that's going to come with compromises, and you should know about them all before you decide to buy.
Giorgi Gvajaia
Tbilisi, Georgia · 1 year ago
⚖️კალიფორნიის შტატის უზენაესმა სასამართლომ მშობლებს, რომლებსაც 12 შვილი 9 წლის განმავლობაში ტყვეობაში ჰყავდათ და აწამებდნენ, სამუდამო პატიმრობა მიუსაჯა. - - - საინტერესო იყო მოსამართლის შეფასება სასჯელის განსაზღვრამდე:👇🏻 ✔️Before sentencing the couple, Judge Bernard Schwartz addressed the defendants, emphasizing, "Children are indeed a gift," not only to their parents and families, but also to society. ✔️”Maybe they'll become a scientist and discover a cure for some disease, or go be a doctor or first responder, and save someone's life. Maybe they'll enter the military and protect our country," Schwartz said. ✔️”The selfish, cruel and inhuman treatment of your own children has deprived them, your family, your friends and society -- and especially both of you -- of those gifts." ✔️”Their lives have been permanently altered, and their ability to learn, grow and thrive." ✔️”To the extent that they do thrive ... it will be not because of you both, but in spite of you both," Schwartz said. 57 წლის დევით და 50 წლის ლუისა ტერპინებს ციხის დატოვება შეწყალების საფუძველზე მხოლოდ 25 წლის შემდეგ შეეძლებათ. სასამართლო სხდომაზე ბავშვებმა განაცხადეს, რომ მშობლები მაინც უყვართ და ყველა ჩადენილ დანაშაულს პატიობენ. ბოდიში მოიხადეს თავად ბრალდებულებმაც. სამართალდამცველებმა ტერპინები გასული წლის იანვარში მას შემდეგ დააკავეს, რაც ერთ-ერთმა შვილმა 17 წლის გოგონამ სახლიდან გაქცევა მოახერხა.
Mariam Sharvashidze
Tbilisi, Georgia · 1 month ago
10 ფაქტი რომელიც ყველა ქალმა უნდა იცოდეს
1. ნაკეცები ყველას აქვს, როცა იხრებიან. 2. როცა ვიღაც გეუბნება, რომ ლამაზი ხარ, დაუჯერე, ისინი არ გატყუებენ. 3. ხანდახან ყველას გვაქვს დილაობით პირში ისეთი სუნი, ვირს რომ მოკლავდა. 4. თითო ქალზე, ვინც სტრიებზე სწუხს მოდის თითო ქალი, ვინც ამ სტრიებს ნატრობს. 5. აუცილებლად უნდა იყოთ მეტად თავდაჯერებული. საკუთარი თავის დანახვა რომ შეგეძლოთ როგორ გხედავენ ამ დროს სხვები, მალევე მიხვდებოდით რატომაც. 6. ნუ მოძებნი კაცს რომ ,,შეგინახოს” ,,გიშველოს” საკუთარი თავი თვითონ უზრუნველყავი ყველაფრით! 7. არაუშავს, თუ საკუთარი სხეულის ყველა ნაწილი არ გეყვარება..... მაგრამ უნდა გიყვარდეს! 8. ყველას გვაყავს ერთი ისეთი მეგობარი, რომელიც, თითქოს და თავს უყრის ყველაფერს ერთად. აი ის ქალი, მოჩვენებითი იდეალური ცხოვრებით. ხოდა, შეიძლება ეგ ქალი შენ იყო ვიღაც სხვისთვის. 9. შენ უნდა იყო პრიორიტეტი! არც მოსაზრება, არც საშუალება და მითუმეტეს არც დარეზერვებული გეგმა! 10. შენ ხარ ქალი! ჯერ მარტო ეს გხდის "damn" :D შესანიშნავს! 💕 10 Facts Every Woman Should Know: 1. Everyone has rolls when they bend over. 2. When someone tells you that you're beautiful, believe them. They aren't lying. 3. Sometimes we all wake up with breath that could kill a goat. 4. For every woman unhappy with her stretch marks is another woman who wishes she had them. 5. You should definitely have more confidence. And if you saw yourself the way others see you, you would. 6. Don't look for a man to save you. Be able to save yourself. 7. It's okay to not love every part of your body....but you should. 8. We all have that one friend who seems to have it all together. That woman with the seemingly perfect life. Well, you might be that woman to someone else. 9. You should be a priority. Not an option, a last resort, or a backup plan. 10. You're a woman. That alone makes you pretty damn remarkable. 💕#ფაქტები #grlpwr Tbilisi
Keso Bigvava
Tbilisi, Georgia · 1 month ago
These 12 Carrie Bradshaw quotes will have you feeling nostalgic for Sex and the City
"The most exciting, challenging, and significant relationship of all is the one you have with yourself. And if you find someone to love the you you love, well that's just fabulous." “Men who are too good looking are never good in bed because they never had to be” "Sometimes we need to stop analyzing the past, stop planning the future, stop figuring out precisely how we feel, stop deciding exactly what we want, and just see what happens." "Maybe our girlfriends are our soulmates and guys are just people to have fun with." "Maybe the past is like an anchor, holding us back. Maybe you have to let go of who you were to become who you will be." "Maybe the best any of us can do is not to quit, play the hand we've been given, and accessorize the outfit we got." "Don't forget to fall in love with yourself first."#CarrieBradshaw #Quotes #Nostalgic #Love #sexandthecity #Fashion Tbilisi
Keso Bigvava
Tbilisi, Georgia · 3 months ago
man spends two year planting flowers to bring blind wife joyJapanese Man Spends 2 Years Planting Tho
You can really love someone so much that you’d be willing to go to the ends of the earth to make them happy. It doesn’t matter what it would take, because as long as there’s something out there that can put a smile on their faces, you’d give everything to bring it to their feet. Yes, that kind of love exists. If a single flower can make someone happy, think of what a garden overflowing with thousands of beautiful, lovely-smelling flowers would do. Mr. and Mrs. Kuroki from Japan have been married for 64 years [1]. The couple owned a dairy farm in Shintomi, Miyazaki, Japan. For 30 years, they toiled and worked hard on their farm, and then it was time to retire. They planned to travel the country and see the world, but they were unable to achieve their dreams when Mrs. Kuroki lost her sight due to complications from diabetes, according to RocketNews24. She was 52 at the time. The couple was heartbroken, especially Mrs. Kuroki. She was so traumatized that she became reclusive, shutting herself away from the world and spending every hour of every day indoors. She was suffering greatly, and so her loving husband decided to do something that would cheer her up forever. If Mrs. Kuroki could no longer see the world, her husband was determined to bring the world to her.#lovestory
Healthy Life
Tbilisi, Georgia · 1 month ago
ალბათ ყველას გქონიათ შემთხვევა როდესაც რაიმეს გაკეთება გსურთ და ოჯახის წევრები,მეგობრები,ახლობლები და სხვები გეუბნებიან რომ ამას ვერ შეძლებთ და თქვენც კარგავთ მოტოვაციას,სტიმულს და თავდაჯერებულობას და ნებდებით უარს ამბობთ საკუთარ მიზანზე და როგორ ფიქრობთ ეს სწორია?! არა ეს ყველაზე ცუსია რაც კი შეიძლება გაუკეთოთ საკუთარ თავს წაართვათ იმედი რაიმეს გაკეთების და მაინც როგორ ფიქრობთ რატომ ხდება ასე რატომ ვაძლებთ უფლებას სხვებს გვათქმევინონ უარი საკუთარ ოცნებებზე. მეგობრებო ირწმუნეთ საკუთარი თავის არ დაკარგოთ თავდაჯერებულობა და თუ თქვენ იქნებით თავდაჯერებული თქვენ შეძლებთ დაუმტკიცოთ საკუთარ თავს და გარშემომყოფებს რომ თქვენთვის შეუძლებელი არაფერია და რომ თქვენ შეგიძლიათ მიაღწიოთ წარმატებას და თქვენივე წარმატება გაგხდით უფრო მეტად ბედნიერს და თავდაჯერებულს გამიზიარეთ თქვენი გამოცდილება მსგავს საკითხზე და ბოლოს გისურვებთ ყველას წარმატებას, თავდაჯერებულობას და საკუთარი მიზნების მიღწევას Probably everyone has had a case where you want to do something and family members, friends, relatives and others tell you that you can’t do it and you also lose motivation, stimulus and self-confidence and voluntarily give up on your goal and how do you think that’s right ?! No. It's the worst thing you can do to deprive yourself of hope to do something, and yet why do you think so? Why do we give others the right to give up on their dreams? My friends do not lose faith in his own self-confidence, and if you are confident you will be able to prove to yourself and those around you that nothing is impossible and that you can succeed in your success, and I will make you happier and more confident in your shared experience in the matter, and finally I wish you all the d Las success, self-confidence and their own goals #motivation #success #happiness