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Levan Gagnidze
Nairobi · 6 months ago

Best time for breakfast in Village Market


Levan Gagnidze
Nairobi · 6 months ago
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The Week UK
London · 2 days ago
Ten Things You Need to Know Today: Sunday 12 Jul 2020
Sunak plans post-Brexit and post-Covid ‘revolution’ Rishi Sunak is planning tax cuts to save the economy, claims the Sunday Telegraph. Levies and red tape will be waved in towns and cities across the country next year, as the government plans a “post-Brexit and post-coronavirus economic revolution”. The chancellor will introduce tax cuts and an shake-up of planning laws in up to 10 new “freeports”. Relatives of coronavirus victims march on Downing Street Grieving relatives of coronavirus victims have marched on Downing Street and told Boris Johnson: “You can’t keep running from us.” More than 150,000 people have backed a petition by the Covid-19 Bereaved Families for Justice UK group calling for an immediate inquiry into the government’s handling of the pandemic. The families accuse the prime minister and Matt Hancock of ignoring them. Donald Trump wears a mask in public for the first time Donald Trump has worn a mask in public for the first time since the start of the coronavirus pandemic. The US president – who has previously insisted that he would not wear a mask - was visiting the Walter Reed military hospital outside Washington. “I've never been against masks but I do believe they have a time and a place,” he said as he left the White House. WHO under fire for not visiting Wuhan laboratory The World Health Organisation inquiry will not visit the Wuhan laboratory that researches coronavirus. The WHO has caused uproar among scientists by indicating that its mission would examine only “the zoonotic source” of the outbreak, an implicit acceptance of Beijing’s theory that the virus jumped naturally from animals to humans in a market in Wuhan selling exotic animals for meat. Keir Starmer boosted by results of opinion poll A poll has found that half of UK voters say they have formed a more favourable view of the Labour party since Keir Starmer became its leader in April. Some 52% of voters now say they could imagine Starmer inside No 10. Two weeks ago, another study found more people cited Starmer as their preferred choice as prime minister (37%) than Boris Johnson (35%). Friends say Ghislaine Maxwell ‘is no Cruella de Vil’ Ghislaine Maxwell says that her portrayal as a “cartoon caricature of a villain” is false. Friends say that the socialite - due in court next week to be formally charged with procuring girls as young as 14 for Jeffrey Epstein – “is no Cruella de Vil”. The friends have told the Mail on Sunday that Maxwell is not the person who introduced billionaire Epstein to Prince Andrew. Covid-19: Bradford among areas of concern Bradford, Sheffield and Kirklees are among the 20 areas in England most at risk of a coronavirus resurgence. According to a classified document leaked to The Observer, the areas among those to have been identified as needing “enhanced support”. Blackburn, Folkestone and Hythe, and Bolton are also on the list. Officials have ordered the army to deploy extra mobile testing units. Patel says fear of race accusations protect sweatshops Priti Patel claims that “cultural sensitivities” have stopped police from dealing illegal sweatshops in Britain’s fast-fashion industry. The home secretary believes that police and other government agencies have turned a blind eye to exploitation in Leicester’s textile warehouses and factories out of fear of being accused of racism. The Sunday Times found that workers in a Leicester factory were being paid as little as £3.50 an hour. Madeleine McCann police search three disused wells Portuguese police and firefighters have searched disused wells in their search for the body of missing Madeleine McCann. The operation involved more than a dozen investigators using specialist climbing gear, including harnesses and ropes. An eye-witness said: “They were around a big well and the firefighters had ropes and other equipment. Later I was told by someone I know that they cleared out a lot of waste from the wells.” Tributes paid to football legend Jack Charlton Tributes have been paid to Jack Charlton, who died on Friday at the age of 85. Former England striker Gary Lineker said Charlton was “a World Cup winner with England, manager of probably the best ever Ireland side and a wonderfully infectious personality to boot”. Mick McCarthy said the passing of former Republic of Ireland manager Jack Charlton “will be felt in Ireland more than anywhere else”.
The Week UK
London · 2 days ago
Ten Things You Need to Know Today: Sunday 12 Jul 2020
Sunak plans post-Brexit and post-Covid ‘revolution’ Rishi Sunak is planning tax cuts to save the economy, claims the Sunday Telegraph. Levies and red tape will be waved in towns and cities across the country next year, as the government plans a “post-Brexit and post-coronavirus economic revolution”. The chancellor will introduce tax cuts and an shake-up of planning laws in up to 10 new “freeports”. Relatives of coronavirus victims march on Downing Street Grieving relatives of coronavirus victims have marched on Downing Street and told Boris Johnson: “You can’t keep running from us.” More than 150,000 people have backed a petition by the Covid-19 Bereaved Families for Justice UK group calling for an immediate inquiry into the government’s handling of the pandemic. The families accuse the prime minister and Matt Hancock of ignoring them. Donald Trump wears a mask in public for the first time Donald Trump has worn a mask in public for the first time since the start of the coronavirus pandemic. The US president – who has previously insisted that he would not wear a mask - was visiting the Walter Reed military hospital outside Washington. “I've never been against masks but I do believe they have a time and a place,” he said as he left the White House. WHO under fire for not visiting Wuhan laboratory The World Health Organisation inquiry will not visit the Wuhan laboratory that researches coronavirus. The WHO has caused uproar among scientists by indicating that its mission would examine only “the zoonotic source” of the outbreak, a boost for Beijing’s theory that the virus jumped naturally from animals to humans in a market in Wuhan that sells exotic animals for meat. Keir Starmer boosted by results of opinion poll A poll has found that half of UK voters say they have formed a more favourable view of the Labour party since Keir Starmer became its leader in April. Some 52% of voters now say they could imagine Starmer inside No 10. Two weeks ago, another study found more people cited Starmer as their preferred choice as prime minister (37%) than Boris Johnson (35%). Friends say Maxwell ‘is no Cruella de Vil’ Ghislaine Maxwell says that her portrayal as a “cartoon caricature of a villain” is false. Friends say that the socialite - due in court next week to be formally charged with procuring girls as young as 14 for Jeffrey Epstein – “is no Cruella de Vil”. The friends have told the Mail on Sunday that Maxwell is not the person who introduced billionaire Epstein to Prince Andrew. Covid-19: Bradford and Kirklees among areas of concern Bradford, Sheffield and Kirklees are among the 20 areas in England most at risk of a coronavirus resurgence. According to a classified document leaked to The Observer, the areas among those to have been identified as needing “enhanced support”. Blackburn, Folkestone and Hythe, and Bolton are also on the list. Officials have ordered the army to deploy extra mobile testing units. Patel says fear of race accusations protect sweatshops Priti Patel claims that “cultural sensitivities” have stopped police from dealing illegal sweatshops in Britain’s fast-fashion industry. The home secretary believes that police and other government agencies have turned a blind eye to exploitation in Leicester’s textile warehouses and factories out of fear of being accused of racism. The Sunday Times found that workers in a Leicester factory were being paid as little as £3.50 an hour. Madeleine McCann police search three disused wells Portuguese police and firefighters have searched disused wells in their search for the body of missing Madeleine McCann. The operation involved more than a dozen investigators using specialist climbing gear, including harnesses and ropes. An eye-witness said: “They were around a big well and the firefighters had ropes and other equipment. Later I was told by someone I know that they cleared out a lot of waste from the wells.” Tributes paid to football legend Jack Charlton Tributes have been paid to Jack Charlton, who died on Friday at the age of 85. Former England striker Gary Lineker said Charlton was “a World Cup winner with England, manager of probably the best ever Ireland side and a wonderfully infectious personality to boot”. Mick McCarthy said the passing of former Republic of Ireland manager Jack Charlton “will be felt in Ireland more than anywhere else”.
The Week UK
London · 1 day ago
Instant Opinion: Keir Starmer must offer more than ‘not being Jeremy Corbyn’
Your guide to the best columns and commentary on Monday 13 July Reaction The Week Staff Monday, July 13, 2020 - 2:20pm The Week’s daily round-up highlights the five best opinion pieces from across the British and international media, with excerpts from each. 1. Tom Harris in The Daily Telegraph on the first 100 days of the Labour leader After 100 days, Keir Starmer needs to offer voters more than ‘not being Jeremy Corbyn’ “The improvements he has made to his party’s – and his own – standing are real and important. That he has made mistakes along the way should hardly surprise anyone, although he needs to make fewer of them if he is to establish himself as a natural repository of anti-government support. Electorates have a nasty habit of making judgments about politicians in the very first few weeks of their tenure, and then refusing to reverse that judgment. The Covid lockdown may have given Starmer a longer period to bed in and might even allow him to have an effective relaunch on the other side of this crisis. From the perspective of a former member, Starmer represents a breath of fresh air for most Labour supporters after five fraught years. But a sense of relief won’t be enough for all those red wall voters, because – and I speak from experience – once you get out of the habit of voting Labour, it’s harder than you might expect to get back into it.” 2. Nesrine Malik in The Guardian in defence of those decried as ‘online mobs’ The ‘cancel culture’ war is really about old elites losing power in the social media age See related What is cancel culture? “Whenever I talk to people who are suddenly concerned about ‘cancel culture’ or ‘online mobs’, my first thought is always: ‘Where have you been for the last decade?’ I’ve been online long enough and, like many others, been receiving criticism and abuse online for long enough, to know that what some see as a new pattern of virtual censure by moral purists is mostly a story about the internet, not ideology or identity. If critics of ‘cancel culture’ are worried about opinions, posts and writings being constantly patrolled by a growing group of haters, then I am afraid they are extremely late to the party. I cannot remember a time where I have written or posted anything without thinking: ‘How many ways can this possibly be misconstrued, and can I defend it if it were?’ It’s not even a conscious thought process now, it’s instinct.” 3. Sean O’Grady in The Independent on the recovery of the British economy Forget global Britain - thanks to Brexit, coronavirus and a trade war with China, we’re losing our grip “There’s something heroic about Britain trying to chuck its weight around this way, and of course no one wants to do business with bullies and tyrants. But still, if the British economy is going to recover from the coronavirus-induced recession and go on to grow in the 2020s it will need its friends and its markets, and the British now seem to intent on blanking virtually everyone. The opportunities seem to be contracting rather than expanding. As everyone agrees, the UK is a great trading nation, and since before the industrial revolution has made its living from selling abroad, but the we don’t seem to be living up to the original hopes of ‘unleashing Britain’s potential’.” 4. John Prideaux, US editor of The Economist, in The Times on an abolitionist deserving of a pedestal A slavery statue we can all agree on: Frederick Douglass “On both sides of the Atlantic a great debate about statues is under way. So far the focus has mostly been on which lumps of bronze and marble should be removed by crane, or pushed into the harbour. There has been less discussion of what to do with all the empty plinths this creates. Yet putting up statues is fun. It is an opportunity to honour someone who should be universally admired and, therefore, to make a statement about what the society doing the putting up values. For those reasons Britain ought to have a statue of America’s greatest campaigner for the abolition of slavery, Frederick Douglass. Douglass had such an extraordinary life that the three autobiographies he wrote hardly seem sufficient.” 5. Nick Akerman, an assistant special prosecutor on the Watergate Special Prosecution Force, in The New York Times on the unfair fight set up for the special prosecutor Did Mueller Ever Stand a Chance Against Trump and Roger Stone? “From the start, Mr. Mueller was restrained by Justice Department regulations. He was barred, for example, from looking into the broader relationship between Mr. Trump and Russia through a review of Mr. Trump’s financial records and tax returns. Furthermore, according to the Mueller report, Mr. Trump made multiple attempts to fire the special counsel, and it is difficult, if not almost impossible, to conduct an investigation under those circumstances... Looking ahead, there needs to be a better mechanism in extraordinary circumstances - like Watergate and Russian interference in the 2016 election - that allows for the appointment of a truly independent special prosecutor. We were lucky to get the Mueller report, but Mr. Mueller was acting under restraints. Unfortunately history tells us that we will need special counsels in the years ahead, under extraordinary circumstances, and like we did with Watergate, that office should have true independence to protect our country and Constitution.” UK News US Russia Crime Science & Health Politics Society Law Keir Starmer Jeremy Corbyn Social media Boris Johnson Brexit slavery Donald Trump Russia US election 2016#world_news
Daily Mail
London · 18 hours ago
Elon Musk is now richer than Warren Buffet as Tesla stock rockets 14% to an all-time high of 14%
Elon Musk became richer than Warren Buffet as shares of Tesla rose more than 14% on Monday for the company's single best day since March and pushing its market value to $321 billion.
Gela Skhulukhia
Dublin · 10 months ago
The Guardian UK
London · 3 days ago
‘I’ve read 35 books in lockdown’ – and it’s done wonders for my mental health
A love of literature helped one woman switch off when an addiction to rolling news threatened to drag her downOnce upon a time, in a distant land, by the sea, there lived a girl who loved a shining rectangle. The girl was foolish, and she believed the rectangle to be wise. Before the sun had fully risen, the girl would consult the rectangle, her hair tangled on her pillow, her eyes gummed together with sleep, and her husband snoring softly beside her. “Oh, rectangle, tell me,” she would whisper. “What should I be sad about today? And what should I be angry about? Magic rectangle, please bring me all of the bad news in the world, so that I might spend the day twitching, and filled with foreboding!”The girl was me. In the days leading up to 23 March, the day of lockdown, there was much to be sad and angry about. I’d started the year with a growing, queasy awareness that my addiction to rolling news was becoming a problem, and I wanted to do something about it. My mental health was suffering, but I couldn’t blame the internet. It was my fault for filling my head with grumpiness and terror every day before breakfast. Instead of grunting over a long list of why everything was absolutely terrible, perhaps I could start the morning by reading a book? Continue reading...#hit_refresh
The Guardian UK
London · 1 day ago
Check, Change, Go: what the UK government's latest slogan means for your holiday
Holidaymakers will soon face higher travel insurance charges and mobile phone costs, and tougher passport controls. Thank goodness for this three-word advice …Name: Holidays.Age: More than a thousand years.Wow! Did the Anglo-Saxons really take trips to Benidorm? Try to treat this seriously. Holiday is derived from the Old English word hāligdæg, meaning holy day. It was a day set aside for religious observance. The trips to Southend and beyond came later.And when did we stop taking them? That’s easier. In 2020, we abandoned holidays in the travel sense and went back to praying. Vacations out; vocations in.But seriously, do you think holidays are over? Well, the newspapers have pictures of the odd bikini-clad Brit sitting in splendid isolation beside a pool in Spain, but in reality people will be taking fewer foreign holidays this summer.Why? The information on which countries you can and can’t travel to without quarantining seems to change every day. Air travel is now even more unpleasant than before. And if you do manage to get to your four-star hotel in Ibiza, you’ll probably have to book for the pool and there will be no breakfast buffet.Oh well, it’ll have to be a staycation for me. That will please Boris Johnson, who says you will be doing your bit for the economy. But expect to have your temperature checked on arrival; there will be queues for the lift because numbers will be restricted; and you will be encouraged to eat in your room.Any other options? Adventurer and chief scout Bear Grylls is fronting a campaign to encourage children to camp out in their garden or a nearby park. It would at least be cheap. And I suppose you could have the breakfast buffet.OK, how much is a pop-up tent? I guess I’ll just have to wait until 2021 to go further afield. Indeed, but start planning now if you want to go anywhere in the EU. The government’s new Check, Change, Go ad campaign – how it loves those three-word slogans – is stressing the problems that will face holidaymakers after the end of the Brexit transition period in December. Such as? Higher travel insurance charges; higher mobile phone costs; tougher passport controls; long bureaucratic delays to get a pet passport.Project Fear? Project Reality!What does Check, Change, Go actually mean? It is being widely interpreted on social media. “Check what Boris Johnson said during the referendum campaign; change your plans to visit the EU; go back to the 1970s,” sums up the general mood.But I thought we were taking back control with an oven-ready deal that was going to save the NHS £350m a week and get us better terms than we ever had as members of the EU. You poor gullible fool. You need a holiday.Do say: “I hear New Malden is nice at this time of year.”Don’t say: “It’s two weeks in the Algarve for us this August as usual.” Continue reading...#european_union_holidays#travel#brexit #european_union
The Week UK
London · 1 day ago
Reaction: UK tackling more than 100 coronavirus outbreaks a week, reveals Hancock
Description Health minister says flare-ups being contained ‘swiftly and silently’ through local lockdowns Credits Chris J Ratcliffe/Getty Images Alt Text Matt Hancock Health minister says flare-ups being contained ‘swiftly and silently’ through local lockdowns In Depth Joe Evans Monday, July 13, 2020 - 11:22am Matt Hancock has revealed that “targeted action” is being taken to battle more than 100 local coronavirus outbreaks across the UK every week. In an article for The Telegraph, the health secretary says that increased testing capacity means “we can take more targeted local action and less national lockdown, to restore the freedom of the majority while controlling the virus wherever we can find it”. Some of these local lockdowns “will make the news but many more are swiftly and silently dealt with”, he writes. The publication of Hancock’s article comes a day after 73 cases of Covid-19 were confirmed at a farm in Herefordshire. The outbreak has seen 200 workers put under lockdown and has fed “concerns over further outbreaks happening as seasonal workers gather for harvest time”, says the newspaper’s political editor Gordon Rayner. Today marks two weeks since Hancock announced that Leicester would become the first UK city to be placed under local lockdown, a decision that the health secretary said would be reviewed this week, ITV reports. Officials will continue to “hunt down the virus” by targeting areas of concern, aided by “the incredible efforts of local authorities – all of whom have stepped up and published their local outbreak control plans in line with the end of June deadline”, Hancock writes. See related Strange conspiracy theories: from 5G to Meghan Markle Coronavirus: the conspiracy theories What makes people believe conspiracy theories? “The government strategy of targeted local responses whenever data suggests a coronavirus flare-up is a key part of its ongoing plan to reopen British businesses in different phases,” the BBC reports. In the latest easing of lockdown measures, beauty salons, spas, tattoo parlours and nail bars in England are welcoming back customers from today. According to Hancock, more than 250 testing centres are now operating nationwide, and the government is also “deploying a dozen walk-in testing centres”. “Where we find a cluster or outbreak, we send in extra testing, including mobile testing units that can be deployed anywhere in the country,” he adds. The BBC says that “clusters of cases” in hospitals, factories or schools will be dealt with by closing the premises. A hospital in Boris Johnson’s local constituency has already shut its accident and emergency department owing to a “coronavirus spike”, the Financial Times reports. About 70 staff at Hillingdon Hospital are also self-isolating after testing positive for Covid-19 or because of contact with an infected person, in an outbreak that showed the “potential for spikes in the disease to disrupt services as the country starts to reopen”, the newspaper adds. Asked during an interview on BBC Breakfast what constituted a coronavirus outbreak, Justice Secretary Robert Buckland said each case would be treated separately, but added that “I think we know it when we see it”. Pushed on whether the virus spreading outside of a household or social bubble would constitute an outbreak, Buckland added: “I defer to the experts in this. “They know what an outbreak constitutes when they see it, and I think with each one that we see we get more knowledgeable, more sophisticated, and are able to respond in ever more appropriate ways.” Science & Health Politics Matt Hancock Coronavirus Covid-19 Lockdown#uk_news
Book Club
Dubai · 1 year ago
“Hacking Growth: How Today's Fastest-Growing Companies Drive Breakout Success“ is a MUST read❗️for any marketer, entrepreneur, innovator or manger looking to replace big wasteful investments with more consistent, cost effective and data-driven results. Written by Sean Ellis & Morgan Brown, the pioneers of Growth Hacking, one of the hottest business methodologies in Silicon Valley and beyond. It features the best business growth methodologies used by Airbnb, Facebook, Pinterest, IBM, Dropbox and many other successful companies. My advice is to purchase the audiobook in Audible, which is approximately 11 hours. You could also buy an online version in the Kindle app or order a hardcopy from Amazon.
Mariam B
Tbilisi · 5 months ago
Welcome to Creative Touch - First mountain event for digital creative professionals held in Georgia, amazing country lost in mountains with snowy peaks and breathtaking views! 🇬🇪❄️ Come and listen to the insights from the industry from the brightest minds representing the companies like DreamWorks Animation, Smashing Media, Wargaming, Scorpion Dagger, Revolver Entertainment, YouTube, Augmented Pixels, Studio Impulse, Boiler Room and others. Creathon, keynote talks, Q/A sessions, workshops, group work, networking parties, skiing, night movies, art installations, music - this is what we expect to enjoy on 27-29 February 2020 in Rooms Kazbegi, one of the best mountain places in the Creative Touch will be attended by not more than 150 people from Georgia and abroad: UI/UX professionals, designers and visual artists, film makers, productions, media, VR/AR developers & artists, marketers, freelancers etc. Spots are limited,get your here: