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Monica Shonia
Tbilisi · 1 year ago

Goodbye UG❤️ see you in september🤩


Monica Shonia
Tbilisi · 1 year ago
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Fashion Folk Tales
Tbilisi · 1 month ago
Diana, Princess of Wales, Rihanna or Kate Moss: who wore the revenge dress best?
Diana, Princess of Wales, November 1994 The press was left open-mouthed when Diana, Princess of Wales went to a party at the Serpentine Gallery in this jaw-dropping black mini dress, in the middle of the media storm that followed her separation from Prince Charles. The shoulder-baring black cocktail dress was widely hailed as the first ever revenge dress and represented a sartorial fist pump for post break-up women everywhere. Rihanna at her third Diamond Ball, September 2017 Strictly speaking, this might not be a revenge dress, but Rihanna’s Ralph & Russo gown played direct homage to Diana, Princess of Wales. As she elaborated to Vogue Paris in the Christmas 2017 issue: “Every time a man cheats on you or treats you badly, you need a revenge dress. Every woman knows that. But whether her choice of this knockdown dress was conscious or not, I am touched by the idea that even Princess Diana could suffer like any ordinary woman. This Diana Bad Bitch moment blew me away.” Kate Moss, September 2007 After a tumultuous two-year relationship, Kate Moss and Pete Doherty finally separated in 2007. The model looked radiant in a vintage Dior silk gown for her first red carpet appearance since their split, making a case for low-key break-up elegance. Gigi Hadid, November 2015 Gigi Hadid and musician Joe Jonas separated just a few months after they had met. When she appeared at the American Music Awards shortly afterwards, Gigi walked the red carpet in a bold white crop top and split skirt, with her hair in a faux bob. Never has Gabrielle Chanel been more more right: "A woman who cuts her hair, is a woman who is preparing to change her life.” Bella Hadid, November 2016 Bella Hadid and The Weeknd found themselves back together on the runway just a few weeks after their break-up, for Victoria's Secret 2016 in Paris. With nothing more than a quick glance for her ex on-stage, the model chose super sexy Julien Macdonald for the after-party.#PrincessDiana #Rihanna #KatemoMoss #GigiHaddid #BellaHadid #Fashion #Revengedress Tbilisi
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Taia Khekhelashvili
Gori · 2 months ago
I AM THE ONE WHO KNOCKS - გავიხსენოთ ყველასთვის დასამახსოვრებელი ფრაზები
- “Say my name.” - “I am not in danger, Skyler. I am the danger. A guy opens his door and gets shot, and you think that of me? No! I am the one who knocks.” - “Smoking marijuana, eating Cheetos, and masturbating do not constitute plans in my book.” - “I did it for me. I liked it. I was good at it. And, I was really…I was alive.” - “Jesse, you asked me if I was in the meth business, or the money business… Neither. I’m in the empire business.” - “I watched Jane die. I was there. And I watched her die. I watched her overdose and choke to death. I could have saved her. But I didn’t.” - “My name is Walter Hartwell White. I live at 308 Negra Aroya Lane, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 87104. To all law enforcement entities, this is not an admission of guilt. I am speaking to my family now. Skyler, you are the love of my life. I hope you know that. Walter Jr., you’re my big man. There are going to be some things that you’ll come to learn about me in the next few days. But just know that no matter how it may look, I only had you in my heart. Goodbye.”#movie #photo #worldd
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The Guardian UK
London · 14 hours ago
Covid-19 is robbing children taken into care of a chance to properly say goodbye to their families
Saying farewell to my children was devastating, but I at least have memories to treasure. Families today aren’t so luckyCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageSixteen years ago, I was choosing gifts for my children. My eldest son, then aged five, had asked for a “big boy’s watch”. My 18-month-old son would be happy with something he could eat, whether it was edible or not.I found a shop selling silver tankards, chose two and had my sons’ names and nicknames engraved, along with “mammy loves you”. I spent ages browsing for the perfect card for each of them. Continue reading...#children#child_protection #social_care#society#coronavirus_outbreak#parents_and_parenting #society_professionals#family#fostering#adoption
The Week UK
London · 1 day ago
Labour EHRC report: everything you need to know about the anti-Semitism investigation
Description The Equality and Human Rights Commission has shared its findings with the party Credits Christopher Furlong/Getty Images Alt Text Jeremy Corbyn The Equality and Human Rights Commission has shared its findings with the party In Depth Holden Frith Tuesday, July 14, 2020 - 2:46pm Labour has been handed a draft report on the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) investigation into anti-Semitism in the party, officials have confirmed. The party has 28 days to respond to the watchdog’s findings, during which time the report will remain private. In a statement last night, Labour said that anti-Semitism had been “a stain” on the party that had caused “unimaginable levels of grief and distress for many in the Jewish community, as well as members of staff”. Why was the investigation opened? The EHRC says it initially “contacted the Labour Party after receiving a number of complaints about allegations of anti-Semitism in the party”. Having “carefully considered” the party’s response, a formal investigation was launched into “whether unlawful acts have been committed by the party or its employees or agents”. The inquiry has also look at whether the party “has responded to complaints of unlawful acts in a lawful, efficient and effective manner”. What triggered to the anti-Semitism complaints? “Anti-Semitism was generally not regarded as a big problem in the Labour Party before Jeremy Corbyn’s election as leader in September 2015,” says the BBC. During his reign, however, the party was dogged by allegations of anti-Jewish prejudice and a failure to act against such discrimination. The row hit the media spotlight in April 2016, when Labour MP Naz Shah posted Facebook messages comparing Israel to Nazi Germany. Days later, while seeking to defend Shah, former London mayor Ken Livingstone said Adolf Hitler had been a Zionist “before he went mad and ended up killing six million Jews”. Some of the controversies directly involved Corbyn. In 2018, a round of protests “flared up after the leader gave his backing to an anti-Semitic London mural, something he later retracted and apologised for”, as The Independent reported in the aftermath. Former Labour MP Frank Field subsequently claimed that the party had become “a force for anti-Semitism in British politics”. Corbyn’s opponents have also “accused him of being too close to Hamas, a militant Islamist group, and Hezbollah, a Lebanese paramilitary group”, says the BBC. “Both groups are widely viewed in the West as terrorist organisations.” How did Corbyn respond? Throughout his leadership, Corbyn said repeatedly that he opposed anti-Semitism. In 2016, he established an inquiry led by Baroness Chakrabarti, the former head of Amnesty International, to examine the allegations. She criticised an “occasionally toxic atmosphere” in the party, but concluded that Labour was “not overrun by anti-Semitism, Islamophobia, or other forms of racism”. But three years later, during the 2019 election campaign, Corbyn appeared to concede that his party did have a problem with anti-Semitism. Invited by ITV’s Good Morning Britain to apologise to Jewish voters, he said: “Obviously, I’m very sorry for everything that’s happened, but I want to make this clear: I am dealing with it. I have dealt with it.” Yet despite Corbyn’s seeming admission, some of his supporters maintained that “the problem had been exaggerated and was being used as a stick to beat him by people who didn’t like his leadership of the party or his views on the Middle East”, says the BBC. An internal inquiry completed earlier this year “found ‘no evidence’ of anti-Semitism complaints being treated differently to other forms of complaint”, Sky News reports. And where allegations were found to have been inadequately investigated, the inquiry blamed anti-Corbyn staff in Labour’s headquarters for creating a “hyper-factional atmosphere [that] affected the expeditious and resolute handling of disciplinary complaints”. Last month, as Labour awaited the findings of the EHRC investigation, Corbyn cast doubt on the independence of the commission. In his first interview after stepping down as party leader, Corbyn told Middle East Eye that he believed the watchdog was “part of the government machine”. Will the inquiry name names? James Libson of law firm Mishcon de Reya, who represents the Jewish Labour Movement, said in June that he thought the EHRC would be “a little reluctant” to name specific people accused of anti-Semitism or of thwarting the investigation. However, Labour List argues that “it is not considered beyond the bounds of possibility that individuals will be censured”. What happens next? Although EHRC reports are not always made public, Labour officials have said the party would like to see the investigation findings published. That is likely to happen in September. “If the EHRC concludes after the investigation that the party has committed an unlawful act, it can give Labour an ‘unlawful act notice’ under Section 21 of the Equality Act,” says Labour List. “This notice can require the party to prepare an action plan so that it avoids continuing or repeating the unlawful act.” Labour last night said that “we are committed to cooperating fully with the commission’s investigation and implementing its recommendations when the final report is published”. UK News Jeremy Corbyn Keir Starmer Anti-Semitism#politics
Keso Bigvava
Tbilisi · 3 months ago
A letter to the UK from Italy: this is what we know about your future
The acclaimed Italian novelist Francesca Melandri, who has been under lockdown in Rome for almost three weeks due to the Covid-19 outbreak, has written a letter to fellow Europeans “from your future”, laying out the range of emotions people are likely to go through over the coming weeks. I am writing to you from Italy, which means I am writing from your future. We are now where you will be in a few days. The epidemic’s charts show us all entwined in a parallel dance. We are but a few steps ahead of you in the path of time, just like Wuhan was a few weeks ahead of us. We watch you as you behave just as we did. You hold the same arguments we did until a short time ago, between those who still say “it’s only a flu, why all the fuss?” and those who have already understood. Coronavirus: the week explained - sign up for our email newsletter Read more As we watch you from here, from your future, we know that many of you, as you were told to lock yourselves up into your homes, quoted Orwell, some even Hobbes. But soon you’ll be too busy for that. First of all, you’ll eat. Not just because it will be one of the few last things that you can still do. You’ll find dozens of social networking groups with tutorials on how to spend your free time in fruitful ways. You will join them all, then ignore them completely after a few days. You’ll pull apocalyptic literature out of your bookshelves, but will soon find you don’t really feel like reading any of it. You’ll eat again. You will not sleep well. You will ask yourselves what is happening to democracy. You’ll have an unstoppable online social life – on Messenger, WhatsApp, Skype, Zoom… Advertisement You will miss your adult children like you never have before; the realisation that you have no idea when you will ever see them again will hit you like a punch in the chest. Old resentments and falling-outs will seem irrelevant. You will call people you had sworn never to talk to ever again, so as to ask them: “How are you doing?” Many women will be beaten in their homes. You will wonder what is happening to all those who can’t stay home because they don’t have one. You will feel vulnerable when going out shopping in the deserted streets, especially if you are a woman. You will ask yourselves if this is how societies collapse. Does it really happen so fast? You’ll block out these thoughts and when you get back home you’ll eat again. You will put on weight. You’ll look for online fitness training. You’ll laugh. You’ll laugh a lot. You’ll flaunt a gallows humour you never had before. Even people who’ve always taken everything dead seriously will contemplate the absurdity of life, of the universe and of it all. You will make appointments in the supermarket queues with your friends and lovers, so as to briefly see them in person, all the while abiding by the social distancing rules. You will count all the things you do not need. The true nature of the people around you will be revealed with total clarity. You will have confirmations and surprises. Literati who had been omnipresent in the news will disappear, their opinions suddenly irrelevant; some will take refuge in rationalisations which will be so totally lacking in empathy that people will stop listening to them. People whom you had overlooked, instead, will turn out to be reassuring, generous, reliable, pragmatic and clairvoyant. Those who invite you to see all this mess as an opportunity for planetary renewal will help you to put things in a larger perspective. You will also find them terribly annoying: nice, the planet is breathing better because of the halved CO2 emissions, but how will you pay your bills next month? You will not understand if witnessing the birth of a new world is more a grandiose or a miserable affair. You will play music from your windows and lawns. When you saw us singing opera from our balconies, you thought “ah, those Italians”. But we know you will sing uplifting songs to each other too. And when you blast I Will Survive from your windows, we’ll watch you and nod just like the people of Wuhan, who sung from their windows in February, nodded while watching us.#Many of you will fall asleep vowing that the very first thing you’ll do as soon as lockdown is over is file for divorce. Many children will be conceived. Your children will be schooled online. They’ll be horrible nuisances; they’ll give you joy. Elderly people will disobey you like rowdy teenagers: you’ll have to fight with them in order to forbid them from going out, to get infected and die. You will try not to think about the lonely deaths inside the ICU. You’ll want to cover with rose petals all medical workers’ steps. You will be told that society is united in a communal effort, that you are all in the same boat. It will be true. This experience will change for good how you perceive yourself as an individual part of a larger whole.#italyItaly
The Week UK
London · 1 day ago
Reaction: second Covid wave ‘could kill 120,000’ in UK this winter
Description Experts warn that preparations to avoid worst-case scenario in NHS hospitals ‘must start now’ Credits Leon Neal/Pool/AFP via Getty Images Alt Text NHS coronavirus Experts warn that preparations to avoid worst-case scenario in NHS hospitals ‘must start now’ In Depth Joe Evans Tuesday, July 14, 2020 - 10:17am Britain must begin “intense preparations” to avoid a second coronavirus spike that could claim up to 120,000 lives in a “reasonable worst-case scenario”, ministers have been warned. A new report from leading doctors and scientists says that unless urgent action is taken, infections could grow “out of control” and overwhelm the NHS this winter - when as The Guardian notes, “services are already stretched because of flu and other seasonal pressures”. The experts also predict that over the coming months, Britain’s R rate could rise from the current levels of between 0.7 and 0.9 to reach 1.7 in September, which “would likely see the UK go back into lockdown”, says Sky News. The 37 scientists and academics behind the report were commissioned by Patrick Vallance, the government’s chief scientific adviser, to model a “reasonable worst-case scenario” for Covid-19 this winter. They believe the peak in hospital admissions and deaths could come in January and February 2021. And the levels of fatalities projected “does not include deaths in the community or care homes”, the broadcaster adds. “A peak of coronavirus infection in the winter could be more serious than the one we’ve just been through,” report chair Stephen Holgate, a professor of immunopharmacology at the University of Southampton, told a press briefing. “We’re anticipating the worst, which is the best we can do.” See related Is Britain prepared for a second wave of coronavirus? Beijing coronavirus outbreak: what can we learn from China’s response to feared ‘second wave’? Reaction: UK tackling more than 100 coronavirus outbreaks a week, reveals Hancock The modelling was based on “the known impact of Covid-19 on healthcare resources, combined with that of flu and other seasonal infections, during a time when health services are often overstretched”, New Scientist reports. The researchers also “looked to the experiences of other countries, particularly what happened to the R number in US states that have recently eased lockdown restrictions”, the magazine continues. Based on their conclusions, the experts are calling “for a series of measures to prepare the NHS, including immediately reorganising social care services and increasing testing capacity”, says ITV News. Flu vaccinations must also be available for the vulnerable and health and social care workers, according to report chair Holgate. “With relatively low numbers of Covid-19 cases at the moment, this is a critical window of opportunity to help us prepare for the worst that winter can throw at us,” he added. Professor Azra Ghani, an infectious disease epidemiologist from Imperial College London who worked on the report, told Sky News that the findings are “not a prediction” but a “worst-case scenario”. “As we move into winter, the weather gets worse, people stay indoors more, windows aren’t open so the likelihood of transmission does of course increase,” she said. “We also have all sorts of other pressures on the NHS that increase during the winter and therefore extra admissions into hospitals.” A government spokesperson also emphasised that the report “represents a worst-case scenario based on no government action”. “We remain vigilant and the government will ensure the necessary resources are in place to avoid a second peak that would overwhelm our NHS,” the spokesperson said. Science & Health Coronavirus Covid-19 NHS#uk_news
Keso Bigvava
Tbilisi · 1 month ago
These 12 Carrie Bradshaw quotes will have you feeling nostalgic for Sex and the City
"The most exciting, challenging, and significant relationship of all is the one you have with yourself. And if you find someone to love the you you love, well that's just fabulous." “Men who are too good looking are never good in bed because they never had to be” "Sometimes we need to stop analyzing the past, stop planning the future, stop figuring out precisely how we feel, stop deciding exactly what we want, and just see what happens." "Maybe our girlfriends are our soulmates and guys are just people to have fun with." "Maybe the past is like an anchor, holding us back. Maybe you have to let go of who you were to become who you will be." "Maybe the best any of us can do is not to quit, play the hand we've been given, and accessorize the outfit we got." "Don't forget to fall in love with yourself first."#CarrieBradshaw #Quotes #Nostalgic #Love #sexandthecity #Fashion Tbilisi
Giorgi Gvajaia
Tbilisi · 1 year ago
Here's why Galaxy Fold displays are already failing There are two distinct issues here, and only one is particularly fixable. Read more 👇🏻 Problem 1: The screen's plastic covering looks removable This is the "fixable" problem. The Galaxy Fold, as every other foldable phone, has a plastic display on top of the OLED display that allows the entire screen to flex. We don't yet have flexible glass, so this is just how things are going to have to be for the foreseeable future. But the problem with that top layer on the Galaxy Fold is that it looks exactly like a pre-installed screen protector we've seen on phone after phone — including the Galaxy S10 — that you have the option of removing. On the Fold, though, the layer is not designed to be removed. It's not just inadvisable to do so, it's not meant to be removable. If you remove that top layer, you've effectively done the same as removing the cover glass from your Galaxy S10 — and, at that point, the display panel itself is going to fail. And it won't take long to do so. Samsung's messaging to early reviewers explicitly reminded us that the top layer of the screen was not removable and that it would compromise the integrity of the display. But even still, the urge to remove that top layer has been ingrained in all of us for over a decade — plastic doesn't feel right on a phone, and it looks like it's removable. Even some of the most egregious offenders of pre-installed screen protectors in the past would still technically allow you to remove the protector and have the phone work properly afterward. This just isn't the same case, even though it feels the same at first. So this part of the problem is fixable, but we don't know what Samsung plans to do about it. Let's remember that the Galaxy Fold is already up for pre-order, and will be shipping to regular consumers (albeit not in large numbers) with no hand-holding or extra information. They'll just get a phone in a box, and in the case of our retail-ready boxes there was not a single warning on the phone or packaging that mentioned you should not remove this top film. Pair that up with the intense desire to want to peel plastic from new phones, and you're set up for a bad news cycle of broken Galaxy Fold screens. Thankfully, proper retail boxes are supposed to have a small warning on the protective film covering the entire phone out of the box. And for as interesting of a news story it is for reviewers to see broken screens, customers that paid $2000 will take this a bit more seriously. It would behoove Samsung to make changes to its packaging and software to make it explicit as possible that the plastic should not be removed like any other phone — a single warning on the piece of plastic that people hastily rip off of every phone really isn't enough when the consequences are this serious. Problem 2: The screen is just fragile, period This is the bigger issue that Samsung inherently can't "fix" without years more development of the display technology that enables these phones to fold over and over again. So you shouldn't remove the top layer of the Galaxy Fold's display. We know this. But the fact that you can remove it (if you try hard enough) and simply doing that is enough to completely render the display useless and quickly broken is a bad sign. At least two of the reports of failed displays came while the Galaxy Fold's top layer was kept in place and undamaged, which points to the larger discussion of just how fragile the display technology is no matter what you do. Should this keep you from buying a Galaxy Fold?🤔 There are many reasons why you should be skeptical of parting with $2000 to buy a Galaxy Fold, well before any of these reports of screen failures arose. The durability and longevity of a flexible display was always going to be in question on these first-generation consumer foldable devices — we just didn't necessarily expect to see it start so spectacularly or so early. If you were hyped enough about the Galaxy Fold to want to place a pre-order, or at least see it in stores at the end of April before potentially buying, it would be a good idea to remind yourself of all of these sorts of problems that can be associated with a device that introduces a brand new form factor and so many new technologies. The Galaxy Fold is not a normal phone, and it's truly pushing the envelope in ways that we haven't seen in years; that's going to come with compromises, and you should know about them all before you decide to buy.
Artists Voyage
Tbilisi · 1 month ago
“It is the time you have wasted for your rose that makes your rose so important.”
On that story, the little prince, fell in love instantly with a rose in his asteroid. The little prince care so much to the rose. The rose with its thorns seems defenseless and susceptible- and yet, she shows off her thorns and puts on a superior attitude. But the rose’s vanity and demands cause the heartbreak of the little prince. And thus, he decided to leave its asteroid and the rose. “She cast her fragrance and her radiance over me. I ought never to have run away from her… I ought to have guessed all the affection that lay behind her poor little stratagems. Flowers are so inconsistent! But I was too young to know how to love her…” Just before the prince leaves, the rose said to it’s prince : “Of course I love you,” the flower said to him. “It is my fault that you have not known it all the while. That is of no importance. But you — you have been just as foolish as I. Try to be happy…” On his voyage to the earth, he come across a huge rose garden, and he realised that his roses were not the only one in the universe. “There might be millions of roses in the whole world, but you’re my only one, unique rose.” On the movie adaptation, the rose is the reason why the prince come back to its asteroid even though it’s too late that the rose has dead. “. . . One sees clearly only with the heart. Anything essential is invisible to the eyes. . . . It’s the time that you spent on your rose that makes your rose so important. . . . You become responsible for what you’ve tamed. You’re responsible for your rose. . . .” The story was telling a beautiful story of love. As the rose, we may take the love that’s being given as granted, and thus, we forgot to ’taking care’ of the love itself. And as a little prince, we may need to go around the world to realise that our rose is the only one because ‘anything essential is invisible to the eyes…’ Even though the rose is being portrayed in the story as a vain, foolish, frail, and naïve creature, the little prince loves that rose. Nothing ever goes away until it teaches us what we need to know.#littleprince #rose #fox #art #love Tbilisi
Giorgi Gvajaia
Tbilisi · 1 year ago
Sorry tourists, Amsterdam doesn't want you anymore❌👇🏻 (CNN) — Famous for its tolerance as much as its narrow houses and broad canals, Amsterdam is undergoing a radical change of attitude when it comes to the millions of tourists that flock to see it each year. Tolerance, it seems, has reached its limits in the Dutch capital, which is now actively urging visitors to head elsewhere as frustrated locals complain of feeling besieged by visitors using the city's bicycle-thronged streets as a travel playground. "The pressure is very high," says Ellen van Loon, a partner at Dutch architectural firm OMA who is involved in adapting the city for the future. "We don't want to turn into a Venice. The problem we are currently facing is that Amsterdam is so loved by tourists, we just have so many coming to the city." While Van Loon acknowledges the positive aspects of tourism, which earns the Dutch economy around 82 billion euros ($91.5 billion) a year, like many locals she's worried that soaring visitor numbers are destroying the soul of this vibrant cosmopolitan city. Like Venice and other destinations across Europe, Amsterdam has become a byword for overtourism -- a phenomenon closely linked to the rise in cheaper air travel that has seen visitors flood certain places, often spoiling the very spot they came to enjoy. While some cities are still formulating ways to cope, Amsterdam -- where a decade-long surge in visitor numbers is forecast to continue, rising from 18 million in 2018 to 42 million in 2030, or more than 50 times the current population -- has simply decided it's had enough. CNN Travel's Richard Quest meets Reinier Sijpkens on board his musical boat. Netherlands tourist officials recently took the bold decision to stop advertising the country as a tourist destination. Their "Perspective 2030″ report, published earlier this year, stated that the focus will now be on "destination management" rather than "destination promotion." The document also outlines the country's future strategy, acknowledging that Amsterdam's livability will be severely impacted by "visitor overload" if action isn't taken. Solutions listed include working to dissuade groups of "nuisance" visitors by either limiting or completely shutting down "accommodation and entertainment products" aimed at them, as well as spreading visitors to other parts of the Netherlands. Some of these measures have already come into play. Last year, the famous "I amsterdam" sign was removed from outside the Rijksmuseum, the city's main art gallery, at the request of the city of Amsterdam, as it was "drawing too big of a crowd to an already limited space. Measures have also been taken to discourage travelers from visiting some of Amsterdam's seedier tourist hotspots. Earlier this year, the city government announced it will end tours of the Red Light District in central Amsterdam, citing concerns that sex workers are being treated as a tourist attraction. One of Amsterdam's most famous residents, Anne died in a concentration camp in 1945 at the age of 15. "We pride ourselves on being a city which is tolerant. A city where people can be themselves, which is true," says museum director Ronald Leopold, one of the guardians of Anne's diary and legacy. "But we also have these dark pages, and these are probably the darkest." According to Leopald, around half of the 1.3 million people who visit the Anne Frank House each year are under the age of 30. "I think it's increasingly important to learn about what happened here during World War II and the Holocaust," he adds. Like many other locals, architect Van Loon fears that Amsterdam, which came in 23rd place on Euromonitor International's report on the Top 100 City Destinations in 2018, is dangerously close to losing its unique allure forever. "The reason tourists come here is because there's something in the character of Amsterdam they love," she explains. "But at a certain point, when the amount of tourists is increasing and increasing, they actually kill what they loved in the first place."