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Tako Janashia
Tbilisi · 1 year ago

In case if you want to get a piercing but u're scared, I can recommend you an amazing girl, she truly is the best! 🙏🏻 will change this earring in a couple days tho 🎉 Sally's piercings - პირსინგების გაკეთება (fb)


Tako Janashia
Tbilisi · 1 year ago
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The Week UK
London · 1 day ago
Instant Opinion: why was Britain last to ‘do the right thing’ on face masks?
Description Masked commuter in a near-deserted London Underground carriage Credits Getty Images Alt Text Tube, Underground, coronavirus Your guide to the best columns and commentary on Tuesday 14 July Reaction The Week Staff Tuesday, July 14, 2020 - 3:47pm The Week’s daily round-up highlights the five best opinion pieces from across the British and international media, with excerpts from each. 1. Sean O’Grady in The Independent on Britain being behind its neighbours... again Face masks make us all safer. So why was Britain, once again, the last to do the right thing? See related Do face masks protect against coronavirus? “There are downsides to this latest ruling from Boris Johnson that masks must be worn in shops, which are obvious. It makes social interaction weird, and it can feel a bit uncomfortable. But this is trivial compared with the role they play in reducing Covid-19 transmission rates, saving lives and boosting the economy. Like so much in this pandemic, it’s about individuals’ liberties being balanced against the impact on others. You can make your own mind up about the risks you take, but you should not make such judgements on behalf of others. Confidence is the key to restoring economic life: consumer confidence to spend, and business confidence to invest. If people feel safer (and indeed are safer) by wearing masks in shops, on public transport and in other indoor spaces, then the ruling will benefit us all.” 2. Hugo Rifkind in The Times on stomaching the risk of a commute What if we don’t want to go back to the office? “Masks, at any rate, aren’t going to get us back into offices. The question is, will anything? ‘Cultures are formed through shared working, which is in turn the basis of shared values,’ wrote Salma Shah for The Times yesterday, highlighting the eventual cost of us all staying at home. She was right. My trips to the office are to do with my new radio gig... but on a daily, newspaper basis I now work with formerly close colleagues whom I haven’t seen for four months. Our shared values, I hope, linger on but I do wonder whether, had we all always worked like this, they’d have been so easily forged in the first place. A bigger problem is the way that, as soon as vast numbers of people stop leaving the house, going to work and coming back again, often having bought at least a sandwich along the way, huge swathes of our cities simply cease to make any sense. Forgive my Londoncentricism, but parts of the capital paint the problem most starkly. Without tens of thousands of civil servants coming and going en route to Whitehall, Victoria looks like it has been hit by, well, a plague.” 3. Michelle Goldberg in The New York Times on Donald Trump’s pandemic incompetence In Some Countries, Normal Life Is Back. Not Here. “If you’re lucky enough to live in New Zealand, the coronavirus nightmare has been mostly over since June. After more than two weeks with no new cases, the government lifted almost all restrictions that month. The borders are still shut, but inside the country, normal life returned... And America? We had 68,241. As of last week, the worst per capita outbreak on the planet was in Arizona, followed by Florida. The world is closed to us; American passports were once coveted, but now only a few dozen nations will let us in. Lawrence O. Gostin, professor of global health law at Georgetown, told me he doesn’t expect American life to feel truly normal before summer 2022. Two years of our lives, stolen by Donald Trump.” 4. Mark Lowcock, UN under-secretary-general for humanitarian affairs, in The Daily Telegraph on a human tragedy more brutal than Covid’s health impacts The developing world faces a health, economic and security crisis that will dwarf the impact of Covid “Economic downturn, rising unemployment and reduced school attendance one year significantly increases the likelihood of civil war the next. Violent conflict drives famine and mass displacement. Based on current forecasts for food insecurity, refugee outflows could increase significantly. These problems might not be immediately apparent the way virus deaths are, but it is not hard to see that they are coming down the track. When they do materialise, it will be hard to explain why we did not act now. We can claim to have been taken by surprise by Covid-19, but we won’t be able to say the same of the development and security crises it is set to trigger. A call for money right now can be a difficult ask. But spending a little money now is a wise investment. It will save lives, protect decades of investment in development, and reduce the scale of the problems in the future.” 5. Dorothy Byrne, editor-at-large at Channel 4, in The Guardian on showing the truth about our past We can’t erase outdated TV shows, but we can hold their views to account “If much-loved characters in the past made homophobic comments or dressed up as people from other ethnic groups or pretended to be people who used wheelchairs, should we destroy that evidence of the social attitudes of the times? Cleaning up our past erases evidence of how views that we would now consider reprehensible were once normalised. Channel 4 is an anti-racist organisation with a particular remit to reach and reflect the lives of people from diverse backgrounds. But we are also committed to freedom of expression and being deliberately daring and controversial. There are bound to be moments when those principles come into conflict. There may be elements in our programmes which are so offensive that a public service broadcaster should not leave them on any platform.” UK News Europe US Middle East Africa South and Central Asia Media Science & Health Politics Society Coronavirus Covid-19 Lockdown Donald Trump poverty Child Poverty#world_news
The Week UK
London · 11 hours ago
Instant Opinion: Brexit has left Britain ‘friendless’ not ‘global’
Description Boris Johnson on the campaign trial during the December 2019 general election Credits Ben Stansall/WPA Pool/Getty Images Alt Text Boris Johnson Your guide to the best columns and commentary on Wednesday 15 July Reaction The Week Staff Wednesday, July 15, 2020 - 2:59pm The Week’s daily round-up highlights the five best opinion pieces from across the British and international media, with excerpts from each. 1. Rafael Behr in The Guardian on Britain’s global gamble Brexit was meant to make Britain global. It has made us friendless “The essential issue here is that Brexit can make EU membership go away, but not the EU itself. When the only problem was being inside, escape was the only solution worth talking about. Hardline Eurosceptics were no more bothered by the issue of how an ex-member state might manage relations with Brussels than arsonists are interested in what to do with ashes. As a result of that complacency, the UK does not have a policy towards the EU, only an impulse away from it and that is of fading relevance. No one followed us out. The fire didn’t catch... The UK is sliding into a strategic void because its only foreign policy is a plan that devalues old European alliances and shifts the balance of power to other continents when trying to make new deals. Johnson cannot address this challenge without exposing the basic flaw in Brexit, which is that the sovereignty he so jealously demands from Brussels buys no clout in Washington, Beijing or anywhere else.” 2. Alison Thomson in The Times on the government’s tin-eared approach to women voters Boris Johnson needs to solve his woman problem “Mr Johnson promises he wants more women in government but only 32 per cent of Tory MPs are female. ‘There’s a problem in the pipeline,’ says Anne Jenkin, the Tory peer. Allegra Stratton recently joined Mr Sunak as his communications director, but more women are needed in Downing Street to break up Dominic Cummings’s ‘frat house’. ‘We are never in the room where it happens,’ says one frustrated female minister. When Mr Johnson was hospitalised in April, four men shared his brief, and nearly all the powerful cabinet subcommittees are made up of men... Contrast this with the female-led response of countries like Germany, New Zealand and Taiwan, which have handled Covid-19 much better. Two months ago, I was called a ‘feminazi’ by men who objected to my view that women had been dealt a worse hand in this pandemic. Now it seems even more apparent. Men may be more likely to die from the virus but women are faring worse in the post-Covid world.” 3. Allison Pearson in The Daily Telegraph on a satorial addition to the new ‘normal’ Compulsory face masks are proof the British bulldog has become the scaredy-cat of Europe See related Do face masks protect against coronavirus? “At least making us wear masks back at the beginning of the pandemic would have made some sort of sense. Introducing a punitive new law now, with the infection rate in steep decline, seems, as does so much of the UK’s handling of coronavirus, like too little too late. Around 20 Britons a day are dying of Covid and you instruct 60 million people to cover their faces, even though the virus has largely disappeared and the vast majority would suffer no ill effects if they got it? No wonder Boris looked sheepish announcing that masks would be mandatory in shops. It’s precisely the kind of nonsensical authoritarianism he would have delighted in lampooning when he was a newspaper columnist. Who on earth is advising him?” 4. Ilayda McIntosh on HuffPost on the reality behind the HBO-BBC hit I May Destroy You Captures The Devastating Way The Justice System Fails Victims Of Sexual Assault “Since 2014, there has been a 44% drop in rape prosecutions in the UK, whilst the number of reported rapes has increased by 173%... The justice system is failing rape and sexual violence victims, both female and male, time and time again. Fundamentally, we need reform. A judicial system that better educates before an individual becomes a victim. A system which provides ongoing support for survivors after; and a curriculum which prioritises the education of consent within sex and relationships education. Of course, these are just initial steps towards the formation of a just system. Admittedly, we have a long way to go, but shows such as I May Destroy You are essential to raising awareness of the system we currently have in place.” 5. Christian Cooper, writer and editor and a board member of New York City Audubon, in The New York Times on letting white people off the hook Why I have chosen not to aid the investigation of Amy Cooper “Why did Cooper so easily tap into that toxic racial bias in the heat of the moment when she was looking for a leg up in our confrontation? Why is it surprising to no one that the police might come charging to her aid with special vengeance on hearing that an African American was involved? And most important of all, how do we fix policing so that scenarios such as this are replaced by a criminal justice system that is truly just and equitable to black people? Focusing on charging Amy Cooper lets white people off the hook from all that. They can scream for her head while leaving their own prejudices unexamined. They can push for her prosecution and pat themselves on the back for having done something about racism, when they’ve actually done nothing, and their own Amy Cooper remains only one purse-clutch in the presence of a black man away.” World News Europe US Crime Media Science & Health Politics Society Law Brexit Boris Johnson Dominic Cummings Coronavirus Covid-19 BBC HBO Black Lives Matter#uk_news
The Guardian UK
London · 3 days ago
'We went to therapy to save our friendship'
Aminatou Sow and Ann Friedman have been best friends for more than a decade. They care about each other so much they even saw a couples counsellor. Now they’ve written a book about what it takes to stay close for the long haulWhen Aminatou Sow and Ann Friedman first met, at a viewing party for the teen drama Gossip Girl in 2009, each recognised a kindred spirit. “I can tell you for a fact that I viscerally remember the moment Ann and I walked in different directions,” recalls Sow, 35. “I remember just the pang of… Ahh, when am I going to see this person again? That feeling. It’s such a vivid episode in my mind.” When Sow got home that night, she found a friend request from Friedman, now 38, on Facebook. She has heard other friends talk about that same feeling of excitement when it comes to the very beginning of a new, platonic relationship. “We just do not understand them to be an intense emotional experience on the same level that we would give to a romance, for example. But I think the excitement is the same, the butterflies are there.”Those butterflies turned into a decade-long, and still going, best friendship. In fact, they like each other so much that they have written a joint memoir of their lives together as friends and colleagues (both are writers and have been co-hosting a podcast, Call Your Girlfriend, since 2014, “for long-distance besties everywhere”). You get the sense, though, that they are using their personal story, with its ups and downs – and there are such downs that at one point, they go to couples’ therapy to salvage their relationship – to sneak in a manifesto of modern friendship, and how to navigate big, emotional platonic relationships successfully. Anyone who has ever experienced the pain of a friendship break-up, yet lacked the words to describe it, will find plenty to take from Big Friendship. Continue reading... #friendship#relationships#life_and_style#books#culture#women
The Week UK
London · 2 days ago
Instant Opinion: Keir Starmer must offer more than ‘not being Jeremy Corbyn’
Your guide to the best columns and commentary on Monday 13 July Reaction The Week Staff Monday, July 13, 2020 - 2:20pm The Week’s daily round-up highlights the five best opinion pieces from across the British and international media, with excerpts from each. 1. Tom Harris in The Daily Telegraph on the first 100 days of the Labour leader After 100 days, Keir Starmer needs to offer voters more than ‘not being Jeremy Corbyn’ “The improvements he has made to his party’s – and his own – standing are real and important. That he has made mistakes along the way should hardly surprise anyone, although he needs to make fewer of them if he is to establish himself as a natural repository of anti-government support. Electorates have a nasty habit of making judgments about politicians in the very first few weeks of their tenure, and then refusing to reverse that judgment. The Covid lockdown may have given Starmer a longer period to bed in and might even allow him to have an effective relaunch on the other side of this crisis. From the perspective of a former member, Starmer represents a breath of fresh air for most Labour supporters after five fraught years. But a sense of relief won’t be enough for all those red wall voters, because – and I speak from experience – once you get out of the habit of voting Labour, it’s harder than you might expect to get back into it.” 2. Nesrine Malik in The Guardian in defence of those decried as ‘online mobs’ The ‘cancel culture’ war is really about old elites losing power in the social media age See related What is cancel culture? “Whenever I talk to people who are suddenly concerned about ‘cancel culture’ or ‘online mobs’, my first thought is always: ‘Where have you been for the last decade?’ I’ve been online long enough and, like many others, been receiving criticism and abuse online for long enough, to know that what some see as a new pattern of virtual censure by moral purists is mostly a story about the internet, not ideology or identity. If critics of ‘cancel culture’ are worried about opinions, posts and writings being constantly patrolled by a growing group of haters, then I am afraid they are extremely late to the party. I cannot remember a time where I have written or posted anything without thinking: ‘How many ways can this possibly be misconstrued, and can I defend it if it were?’ It’s not even a conscious thought process now, it’s instinct.” 3. Sean O’Grady in The Independent on the recovery of the British economy Forget global Britain - thanks to Brexit, coronavirus and a trade war with China, we’re losing our grip “There’s something heroic about Britain trying to chuck its weight around this way, and of course no one wants to do business with bullies and tyrants. But still, if the British economy is going to recover from the coronavirus-induced recession and go on to grow in the 2020s it will need its friends and its markets, and the British now seem to intent on blanking virtually everyone. The opportunities seem to be contracting rather than expanding. As everyone agrees, the UK is a great trading nation, and since before the industrial revolution has made its living from selling abroad, but the we don’t seem to be living up to the original hopes of ‘unleashing Britain’s potential’.” 4. John Prideaux, US editor of The Economist, in The Times on an abolitionist deserving of a pedestal A slavery statue we can all agree on: Frederick Douglass “On both sides of the Atlantic a great debate about statues is under way. So far the focus has mostly been on which lumps of bronze and marble should be removed by crane, or pushed into the harbour. There has been less discussion of what to do with all the empty plinths this creates. Yet putting up statues is fun. It is an opportunity to honour someone who should be universally admired and, therefore, to make a statement about what the society doing the putting up values. For those reasons Britain ought to have a statue of America’s greatest campaigner for the abolition of slavery, Frederick Douglass. Douglass had such an extraordinary life that the three autobiographies he wrote hardly seem sufficient.” 5. Nick Akerman, an assistant special prosecutor on the Watergate Special Prosecution Force, in The New York Times on the unfair fight set up for the special prosecutor Did Mueller Ever Stand a Chance Against Trump and Roger Stone? “From the start, Mr. Mueller was restrained by Justice Department regulations. He was barred, for example, from looking into the broader relationship between Mr. Trump and Russia through a review of Mr. Trump’s financial records and tax returns. Furthermore, according to the Mueller report, Mr. Trump made multiple attempts to fire the special counsel, and it is difficult, if not almost impossible, to conduct an investigation under those circumstances... Looking ahead, there needs to be a better mechanism in extraordinary circumstances - like Watergate and Russian interference in the 2016 election - that allows for the appointment of a truly independent special prosecutor. We were lucky to get the Mueller report, but Mr. Mueller was acting under restraints. Unfortunately history tells us that we will need special counsels in the years ahead, under extraordinary circumstances, and like we did with Watergate, that office should have true independence to protect our country and Constitution.” UK News US Russia Crime Science & Health Politics Society Law Keir Starmer Jeremy Corbyn Social media Boris Johnson Brexit slavery Donald Trump Russia US election 2016#world_news
Giorgi Gvajaia
Tbilisi · 1 year ago
Here's why Galaxy Fold displays are already failing There are two distinct issues here, and only one is particularly fixable. Read more 👇🏻 Problem 1: The screen's plastic covering looks removable This is the "fixable" problem. The Galaxy Fold, as every other foldable phone, has a plastic display on top of the OLED display that allows the entire screen to flex. We don't yet have flexible glass, so this is just how things are going to have to be for the foreseeable future. But the problem with that top layer on the Galaxy Fold is that it looks exactly like a pre-installed screen protector we've seen on phone after phone — including the Galaxy S10 — that you have the option of removing. On the Fold, though, the layer is not designed to be removed. It's not just inadvisable to do so, it's not meant to be removable. If you remove that top layer, you've effectively done the same as removing the cover glass from your Galaxy S10 — and, at that point, the display panel itself is going to fail. And it won't take long to do so. Samsung's messaging to early reviewers explicitly reminded us that the top layer of the screen was not removable and that it would compromise the integrity of the display. But even still, the urge to remove that top layer has been ingrained in all of us for over a decade — plastic doesn't feel right on a phone, and it looks like it's removable. Even some of the most egregious offenders of pre-installed screen protectors in the past would still technically allow you to remove the protector and have the phone work properly afterward. This just isn't the same case, even though it feels the same at first. So this part of the problem is fixable, but we don't know what Samsung plans to do about it. Let's remember that the Galaxy Fold is already up for pre-order, and will be shipping to regular consumers (albeit not in large numbers) with no hand-holding or extra information. They'll just get a phone in a box, and in the case of our retail-ready boxes there was not a single warning on the phone or packaging that mentioned you should not remove this top film. Pair that up with the intense desire to want to peel plastic from new phones, and you're set up for a bad news cycle of broken Galaxy Fold screens. Thankfully, proper retail boxes are supposed to have a small warning on the protective film covering the entire phone out of the box. And for as interesting of a news story it is for reviewers to see broken screens, customers that paid $2000 will take this a bit more seriously. It would behoove Samsung to make changes to its packaging and software to make it explicit as possible that the plastic should not be removed like any other phone — a single warning on the piece of plastic that people hastily rip off of every phone really isn't enough when the consequences are this serious. Problem 2: The screen is just fragile, period This is the bigger issue that Samsung inherently can't "fix" without years more development of the display technology that enables these phones to fold over and over again. So you shouldn't remove the top layer of the Galaxy Fold's display. We know this. But the fact that you can remove it (if you try hard enough) and simply doing that is enough to completely render the display useless and quickly broken is a bad sign. At least two of the reports of failed displays came while the Galaxy Fold's top layer was kept in place and undamaged, which points to the larger discussion of just how fragile the display technology is no matter what you do. Should this keep you from buying a Galaxy Fold?🤔 There are many reasons why you should be skeptical of parting with $2000 to buy a Galaxy Fold, well before any of these reports of screen failures arose. The durability and longevity of a flexible display was always going to be in question on these first-generation consumer foldable devices — we just didn't necessarily expect to see it start so spectacularly or so early. If you were hyped enough about the Galaxy Fold to want to place a pre-order, or at least see it in stores at the end of April before potentially buying, it would be a good idea to remind yourself of all of these sorts of problems that can be associated with a device that introduces a brand new form factor and so many new technologies. The Galaxy Fold is not a normal phone, and it's truly pushing the envelope in ways that we haven't seen in years; that's going to come with compromises, and you should know about them all before you decide to buy.
The Guardian UK
London · 3 days ago
I went to my mum's house to make a very important Zoom call. Big mistake | Zoe Williams
In search of somewhere peaceful, with an appropriate backdrop of books, I decided to visit my mother. Between her builder and her wifi, it was a disaster‘Write a diary,” everybody said at the start of lockdown. “Everything will change. The way you feel will completely change. Make like Samuel Pepys and the plague. Leave a little something for the historians.” Everything has changed, and yet nothing has changed. Nothing. [Solid Theresa May emphasis.] Has. Changed. My putatively shielding mother still has her builder round every day. My ceiling has still fallen in. We still don’t know where the leak is coming from, successive plumbers scratching their heads, nothing for a week followed by more water. The conversations get smaller and smaller, but the physical realities of the world don’t change. Water will always find its own level – in this case, the floor (absent a ceiling).Rules, though – they’ve changed. In England, they were relaxed last Monday for those shielding, giving most of them more freedom to see friends and family. So when I had an Extremely Important Zoom to do, instead of using my son’s room, with a poster of Dark Phoenix and an unmade bed where the intellectual books should be, I went to my mother’s. She has a great bookshelf. My sister painted it, to commission, to look like the sculpture of a bookshelf she made for me when I went to university. All the shelves in that sculpture contained a different, insane thing – a miniature sheep, a tin bucket, an impossibly small matchstick – which, looking back, I can only take to be an elaborate diss: “You ain’t never gonna read any books, you doughnut.” I didn’t notice that at the time. All the shelves in my mother’s real-life version have books in them, which even though they are a bit special-interest (it’s basically a compendium of 80s conspiracy theories about nuclear waste) certainly wouldn’t disgrace a person. Continue reading... #zoom#technology#work_&_careers
Keso Bigvava
Tbilisi · 3 months ago
A letter to the UK from Italy: this is what we know about your future
The acclaimed Italian novelist Francesca Melandri, who has been under lockdown in Rome for almost three weeks due to the Covid-19 outbreak, has written a letter to fellow Europeans “from your future”, laying out the range of emotions people are likely to go through over the coming weeks. I am writing to you from Italy, which means I am writing from your future. We are now where you will be in a few days. The epidemic’s charts show us all entwined in a parallel dance. We are but a few steps ahead of you in the path of time, just like Wuhan was a few weeks ahead of us. We watch you as you behave just as we did. You hold the same arguments we did until a short time ago, between those who still say “it’s only a flu, why all the fuss?” and those who have already understood. Coronavirus: the week explained - sign up for our email newsletter Read more As we watch you from here, from your future, we know that many of you, as you were told to lock yourselves up into your homes, quoted Orwell, some even Hobbes. But soon you’ll be too busy for that. First of all, you’ll eat. Not just because it will be one of the few last things that you can still do. You’ll find dozens of social networking groups with tutorials on how to spend your free time in fruitful ways. You will join them all, then ignore them completely after a few days. You’ll pull apocalyptic literature out of your bookshelves, but will soon find you don’t really feel like reading any of it. You’ll eat again. You will not sleep well. You will ask yourselves what is happening to democracy. You’ll have an unstoppable online social life – on Messenger, WhatsApp, Skype, Zoom… Advertisement You will miss your adult children like you never have before; the realisation that you have no idea when you will ever see them again will hit you like a punch in the chest. Old resentments and falling-outs will seem irrelevant. You will call people you had sworn never to talk to ever again, so as to ask them: “How are you doing?” Many women will be beaten in their homes. You will wonder what is happening to all those who can’t stay home because they don’t have one. You will feel vulnerable when going out shopping in the deserted streets, especially if you are a woman. You will ask yourselves if this is how societies collapse. Does it really happen so fast? You’ll block out these thoughts and when you get back home you’ll eat again. You will put on weight. You’ll look for online fitness training. You’ll laugh. You’ll laugh a lot. You’ll flaunt a gallows humour you never had before. Even people who’ve always taken everything dead seriously will contemplate the absurdity of life, of the universe and of it all. You will make appointments in the supermarket queues with your friends and lovers, so as to briefly see them in person, all the while abiding by the social distancing rules. You will count all the things you do not need. The true nature of the people around you will be revealed with total clarity. You will have confirmations and surprises. Literati who had been omnipresent in the news will disappear, their opinions suddenly irrelevant; some will take refuge in rationalisations which will be so totally lacking in empathy that people will stop listening to them. People whom you had overlooked, instead, will turn out to be reassuring, generous, reliable, pragmatic and clairvoyant. Those who invite you to see all this mess as an opportunity for planetary renewal will help you to put things in a larger perspective. You will also find them terribly annoying: nice, the planet is breathing better because of the halved CO2 emissions, but how will you pay your bills next month? You will not understand if witnessing the birth of a new world is more a grandiose or a miserable affair. You will play music from your windows and lawns. When you saw us singing opera from our balconies, you thought “ah, those Italians”. But we know you will sing uplifting songs to each other too. And when you blast I Will Survive from your windows, we’ll watch you and nod just like the people of Wuhan, who sung from their windows in February, nodded while watching us.#Many of you will fall asleep vowing that the very first thing you’ll do as soon as lockdown is over is file for divorce. Many children will be conceived. Your children will be schooled online. They’ll be horrible nuisances; they’ll give you joy. Elderly people will disobey you like rowdy teenagers: you’ll have to fight with them in order to forbid them from going out, to get infected and die. You will try not to think about the lonely deaths inside the ICU. You’ll want to cover with rose petals all medical workers’ steps. You will be told that society is united in a communal effort, that you are all in the same boat. It will be true. This experience will change for good how you perceive yourself as an individual part of a larger whole.#italyItaly
The Guardian UK
London · 2 days ago
Check, Change, Go: what the UK government's latest slogan means for your holiday
Holidaymakers will soon face higher travel insurance charges and mobile phone costs, and tougher passport controls. Thank goodness for this three-word advice …Name: Holidays.Age: More than a thousand years.Wow! Did the Anglo-Saxons really take trips to Benidorm? Try to treat this seriously. Holiday is derived from the Old English word hāligdæg, meaning holy day. It was a day set aside for religious observance. The trips to Southend and beyond came later.And when did we stop taking them? That’s easier. In 2020, we abandoned holidays in the travel sense and went back to praying. Vacations out; vocations in.But seriously, do you think holidays are over? Well, the newspapers have pictures of the odd bikini-clad Brit sitting in splendid isolation beside a pool in Spain, but in reality people will be taking fewer foreign holidays this summer.Why? The information on which countries you can and can’t travel to without quarantining seems to change every day. Air travel is now even more unpleasant than before. And if you do manage to get to your four-star hotel in Ibiza, you’ll probably have to book for the pool and there will be no breakfast buffet.Oh well, it’ll have to be a staycation for me. That will please Boris Johnson, who says you will be doing your bit for the economy. But expect to have your temperature checked on arrival; there will be queues for the lift because numbers will be restricted; and you will be encouraged to eat in your room.Any other options? Adventurer and chief scout Bear Grylls is fronting a campaign to encourage children to camp out in their garden or a nearby park. It would at least be cheap. And I suppose you could have the breakfast buffet.OK, how much is a pop-up tent? I guess I’ll just have to wait until 2021 to go further afield. Indeed, but start planning now if you want to go anywhere in the EU. The government’s new Check, Change, Go ad campaign – how it loves those three-word slogans – is stressing the problems that will face holidaymakers after the end of the Brexit transition period in December. Such as? Higher travel insurance charges; higher mobile phone costs; tougher passport controls; long bureaucratic delays to get a pet passport.Project Fear? Project Reality!What does Check, Change, Go actually mean? It is being widely interpreted on social media. “Check what Boris Johnson said during the referendum campaign; change your plans to visit the EU; go back to the 1970s,” sums up the general mood.But I thought we were taking back control with an oven-ready deal that was going to save the NHS £350m a week and get us better terms than we ever had as members of the EU. You poor gullible fool. You need a holiday.Do say: “I hear New Malden is nice at this time of year.”Don’t say: “It’s two weeks in the Algarve for us this August as usual.” Continue reading...#european_union_holidays#travel#brexit #european_union
Giorgi Gvajaia
Tbilisi · 1 year ago
Sorry tourists, Amsterdam doesn't want you anymore❌👇🏻 (CNN) — Famous for its tolerance as much as its narrow houses and broad canals, Amsterdam is undergoing a radical change of attitude when it comes to the millions of tourists that flock to see it each year. Tolerance, it seems, has reached its limits in the Dutch capital, which is now actively urging visitors to head elsewhere as frustrated locals complain of feeling besieged by visitors using the city's bicycle-thronged streets as a travel playground. "The pressure is very high," says Ellen van Loon, a partner at Dutch architectural firm OMA who is involved in adapting the city for the future. "We don't want to turn into a Venice. The problem we are currently facing is that Amsterdam is so loved by tourists, we just have so many coming to the city." While Van Loon acknowledges the positive aspects of tourism, which earns the Dutch economy around 82 billion euros ($91.5 billion) a year, like many locals she's worried that soaring visitor numbers are destroying the soul of this vibrant cosmopolitan city. Like Venice and other destinations across Europe, Amsterdam has become a byword for overtourism -- a phenomenon closely linked to the rise in cheaper air travel that has seen visitors flood certain places, often spoiling the very spot they came to enjoy. While some cities are still formulating ways to cope, Amsterdam -- where a decade-long surge in visitor numbers is forecast to continue, rising from 18 million in 2018 to 42 million in 2030, or more than 50 times the current population -- has simply decided it's had enough. CNN Travel's Richard Quest meets Reinier Sijpkens on board his musical boat. Netherlands tourist officials recently took the bold decision to stop advertising the country as a tourist destination. Their "Perspective 2030″ report, published earlier this year, stated that the focus will now be on "destination management" rather than "destination promotion." The document also outlines the country's future strategy, acknowledging that Amsterdam's livability will be severely impacted by "visitor overload" if action isn't taken. Solutions listed include working to dissuade groups of "nuisance" visitors by either limiting or completely shutting down "accommodation and entertainment products" aimed at them, as well as spreading visitors to other parts of the Netherlands. Some of these measures have already come into play. Last year, the famous "I amsterdam" sign was removed from outside the Rijksmuseum, the city's main art gallery, at the request of the city of Amsterdam, as it was "drawing too big of a crowd to an already limited space. Measures have also been taken to discourage travelers from visiting some of Amsterdam's seedier tourist hotspots. Earlier this year, the city government announced it will end tours of the Red Light District in central Amsterdam, citing concerns that sex workers are being treated as a tourist attraction. One of Amsterdam's most famous residents, Anne died in a concentration camp in 1945 at the age of 15. "We pride ourselves on being a city which is tolerant. A city where people can be themselves, which is true," says museum director Ronald Leopold, one of the guardians of Anne's diary and legacy. "But we also have these dark pages, and these are probably the darkest." According to Leopald, around half of the 1.3 million people who visit the Anne Frank House each year are under the age of 30. "I think it's increasingly important to learn about what happened here during World War II and the Holocaust," he adds. Like many other locals, architect Van Loon fears that Amsterdam, which came in 23rd place on Euromonitor International's report on the Top 100 City Destinations in 2018, is dangerously close to losing its unique allure forever. "The reason tourists come here is because there's something in the character of Amsterdam they love," she explains. "But at a certain point, when the amount of tourists is increasing and increasing, they actually kill what they loved in the first place."
The Guardian UK
London · 7 hours ago
Aidan O'Brien urges racing to get tough on 'stone age' race-riding tactics
Dominant Flat-racing trainer angry at lack of action‘Everybody has kept quiet for too long’ says handlerAidan O’Brien has spoken out against “stone age” race-riding tactics and called for a culture change in the way stewards enforce the rules on interference. The dominant Flat-racing trainer was careful to confine most of his comments to Irish racing but also noted a couple of incidents in Britain this year that had irked him, and said it was time for a plain-speaking discussion in public after years of discreet lobbying of the authorities had failed to bring change.“What we all want is the best horse to win all the time,” O’Brien told the Guardian, speaking with a measure of anger he rarely shows. “There was an old thing of jockeys closing the door on other jockeys and not letting out other jockeys and taking their ground. I think that’s all stone-age stuff and it’s dangerous. Related: Talking Horses: York set early August deadline for crowds at Ebor meeting Continue reading... #horse_racing#aidan_o'brien#horse_racing_tips#sport