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Anna
Tbilisi · 9 months ago

Fast and Furious crew in front of Radisson on Rustaveli str. Right now. If you want to see their cars and take pictures, you can.

The guard responsible for protecting the cars is super friendly.


Anna
Tbilisi · 9 months ago
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Nika Romanadze
Kobuleti, Georgia · 3 months ago
National day of pryer in USA
In our times of greatest need, Americans have always turned to prayer to help guide us through trials and periods of uncertainty. As we continue to face the unique challenges posed by the coronavirus pandemic, millions of Americans are unable to gather in their churches, temples, synagogues, mosques, and other houses of worship. But in this time we must not cease asking God for added wisdom, comfort, and strength, and we must especially pray for those who have suffered harm or who have lost loved ones. I ask you to join me in a day of prayer for all people who have been affected by the coronavirus pandemic and to pray for God’s healing hand to be placed on the people of our Nation. As your President, I ask you to pray for the health and well-being of your fellow Americans and to remember that no problem is too big for God to handle. We should all take to heart the holy words found in 1 Peter 5:7: “Casting all your care upon him, for he careth for you.” Let us pray that all those affected by the virus will feel the presence of our Lord’s protection and love during this time. With God’s help, we will overcome this threat. On Friday, I declared a national emergency and took other bold actions to help deploy the full power of the Federal Government to assist with efforts to combat the coronavirus pandemic. I now encourage all Americans to pray for those on the front lines of the response, especially our Nation’s outstanding medical professionals and public health officials who are working tirelessly to protect all of us from the coronavirus and treat patients who are infected; all of our courageous first responders, National Guard, and dedicated individuals who are working to ensure the health and safety of our communities; and our Federal, State, and local leaders. We are confident that He will provide them with the wisdom they need to make difficult decisions and take decisive actions to protect Americans all across the country. As we come to our Father in prayer, we remember the words found in Psalm 91: “He is my refuge and my fortress: my God; in him will I trust.” As we unite in prayer, we are reminded that there is no burden too heavy for God to lift or for this country to bear with His help. Luke 1:37 promises that “For with God nothing shall be impossible,” and those words are just as true today as they have ever been. As one Nation under God, we are greater than the hardships we face, and through prayer and acts of compassion and love, we will rise to this challenge and emerge stronger and more united than ever before. May God bless each of you, and may God bless the United States of America. NOW, THEREFORE, I, DONALD J. TRUMP, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim March 15, 2020, as a National Day of Prayer for All Americans Affected by the Coronavirus Pandemic and for our National Response Efforts. I urge Americans of all faiths and religious traditions and backgrounds to offer prayers for all those affected, including people who have suffered harm or lost loved ones. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourteenth day of March, in the year of our Lord two thousand twenty, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and forty-fourth. DONALD J. TRUMP #politics #news #donaldtrump #usa #whitehouses
Giorgi Gvajaia
Tbilisi, Georgia · 1 year ago
Here's why Galaxy Fold displays are already failing There are two distinct issues here, and only one is particularly fixable. Read more 👇🏻 Problem 1: The screen's plastic covering looks removable This is the "fixable" problem. The Galaxy Fold, as every other foldable phone, has a plastic display on top of the OLED display that allows the entire screen to flex. We don't yet have flexible glass, so this is just how things are going to have to be for the foreseeable future. But the problem with that top layer on the Galaxy Fold is that it looks exactly like a pre-installed screen protector we've seen on phone after phone — including the Galaxy S10 — that you have the option of removing. On the Fold, though, the layer is not designed to be removed. It's not just inadvisable to do so, it's not meant to be removable. If you remove that top layer, you've effectively done the same as removing the cover glass from your Galaxy S10 — and, at that point, the display panel itself is going to fail. And it won't take long to do so. Samsung's messaging to early reviewers explicitly reminded us that the top layer of the screen was not removable and that it would compromise the integrity of the display. But even still, the urge to remove that top layer has been ingrained in all of us for over a decade — plastic doesn't feel right on a phone, and it looks like it's removable. Even some of the most egregious offenders of pre-installed screen protectors in the past would still technically allow you to remove the protector and have the phone work properly afterward. This just isn't the same case, even though it feels the same at first. So this part of the problem is fixable, but we don't know what Samsung plans to do about it. Let's remember that the Galaxy Fold is already up for pre-order, and will be shipping to regular consumers (albeit not in large numbers) with no hand-holding or extra information. They'll just get a phone in a box, and in the case of our retail-ready boxes there was not a single warning on the phone or packaging that mentioned you should not remove this top film. Pair that up with the intense desire to want to peel plastic from new phones, and you're set up for a bad news cycle of broken Galaxy Fold screens. Thankfully, proper retail boxes are supposed to have a small warning on the protective film covering the entire phone out of the box. And for as interesting of a news story it is for reviewers to see broken screens, customers that paid $2000 will take this a bit more seriously. It would behoove Samsung to make changes to its packaging and software to make it explicit as possible that the plastic should not be removed like any other phone — a single warning on the piece of plastic that people hastily rip off of every phone really isn't enough when the consequences are this serious. Problem 2: The screen is just fragile, period This is the bigger issue that Samsung inherently can't "fix" without years more development of the display technology that enables these phones to fold over and over again. So you shouldn't remove the top layer of the Galaxy Fold's display. We know this. But the fact that you can remove it (if you try hard enough) and simply doing that is enough to completely render the display useless and quickly broken is a bad sign. At least two of the reports of failed displays came while the Galaxy Fold's top layer was kept in place and undamaged, which points to the larger discussion of just how fragile the display technology is no matter what you do. Should this keep you from buying a Galaxy Fold?🤔 There are many reasons why you should be skeptical of parting with $2000 to buy a Galaxy Fold, well before any of these reports of screen failures arose. The durability and longevity of a flexible display was always going to be in question on these first-generation consumer foldable devices — we just didn't necessarily expect to see it start so spectacularly or so early. If you were hyped enough about the Galaxy Fold to want to place a pre-order, or at least see it in stores at the end of April before potentially buying, it would be a good idea to remind yourself of all of these sorts of problems that can be associated with a device that introduces a brand new form factor and so many new technologies. The Galaxy Fold is not a normal phone, and it's truly pushing the envelope in ways that we haven't seen in years; that's going to come with compromises, and you should know about them all before you decide to buy.
Keso Bigvava
Tbilisi, Georgia · 3 months ago
A letter to the UK from Italy: this is what we know about your future
The acclaimed Italian novelist Francesca Melandri, who has been under lockdown in Rome for almost three weeks due to the Covid-19 outbreak, has written a letter to fellow Europeans “from your future”, laying out the range of emotions people are likely to go through over the coming weeks. I am writing to you from Italy, which means I am writing from your future. We are now where you will be in a few days. The epidemic’s charts show us all entwined in a parallel dance. We are but a few steps ahead of you in the path of time, just like Wuhan was a few weeks ahead of us. We watch you as you behave just as we did. You hold the same arguments we did until a short time ago, between those who still say “it’s only a flu, why all the fuss?” and those who have already understood. Coronavirus: the week explained - sign up for our email newsletter Read more As we watch you from here, from your future, we know that many of you, as you were told to lock yourselves up into your homes, quoted Orwell, some even Hobbes. But soon you’ll be too busy for that. First of all, you’ll eat. Not just because it will be one of the few last things that you can still do. You’ll find dozens of social networking groups with tutorials on how to spend your free time in fruitful ways. You will join them all, then ignore them completely after a few days. You’ll pull apocalyptic literature out of your bookshelves, but will soon find you don’t really feel like reading any of it. You’ll eat again. You will not sleep well. You will ask yourselves what is happening to democracy. You’ll have an unstoppable online social life – on Messenger, WhatsApp, Skype, Zoom… Advertisement You will miss your adult children like you never have before; the realisation that you have no idea when you will ever see them again will hit you like a punch in the chest. Old resentments and falling-outs will seem irrelevant. You will call people you had sworn never to talk to ever again, so as to ask them: “How are you doing?” Many women will be beaten in their homes. You will wonder what is happening to all those who can’t stay home because they don’t have one. You will feel vulnerable when going out shopping in the deserted streets, especially if you are a woman. You will ask yourselves if this is how societies collapse. Does it really happen so fast? You’ll block out these thoughts and when you get back home you’ll eat again. You will put on weight. You’ll look for online fitness training. You’ll laugh. You’ll laugh a lot. You’ll flaunt a gallows humour you never had before. Even people who’ve always taken everything dead seriously will contemplate the absurdity of life, of the universe and of it all. You will make appointments in the supermarket queues with your friends and lovers, so as to briefly see them in person, all the while abiding by the social distancing rules. You will count all the things you do not need. The true nature of the people around you will be revealed with total clarity. You will have confirmations and surprises. Literati who had been omnipresent in the news will disappear, their opinions suddenly irrelevant; some will take refuge in rationalisations which will be so totally lacking in empathy that people will stop listening to them. People whom you had overlooked, instead, will turn out to be reassuring, generous, reliable, pragmatic and clairvoyant. Those who invite you to see all this mess as an opportunity for planetary renewal will help you to put things in a larger perspective. You will also find them terribly annoying: nice, the planet is breathing better because of the halved CO2 emissions, but how will you pay your bills next month? You will not understand if witnessing the birth of a new world is more a grandiose or a miserable affair. You will play music from your windows and lawns. When you saw us singing opera from our balconies, you thought “ah, those Italians”. But we know you will sing uplifting songs to each other too. And when you blast I Will Survive from your windows, we’ll watch you and nod just like the people of Wuhan, who sung from their windows in February, nodded while watching us.#Many of you will fall asleep vowing that the very first thing you’ll do as soon as lockdown is over is file for divorce. Many children will be conceived. Your children will be schooled online. They’ll be horrible nuisances; they’ll give you joy. Elderly people will disobey you like rowdy teenagers: you’ll have to fight with them in order to forbid them from going out, to get infected and die. You will try not to think about the lonely deaths inside the ICU. You’ll want to cover with rose petals all medical workers’ steps. You will be told that society is united in a communal effort, that you are all in the same boat. It will be true. This experience will change for good how you perceive yourself as an individual part of a larger whole.#italyItaly
The Week UK
London, United Kingdom · 2 days ago
Instant Opinion: the year is 2022 - so ‘what does life look like’?
Credits Tomohiro Ohsumi/Getty Images Your guide to the best columns and commentary on Friday 10 July Reaction The Week Staff Friday, July 10, 2020 - 12:08pm The Week’s daily round-up highlights the five best opinion pieces from across the British and international media, with excerpts from each. 1. David Leonhardt in The New York Times on the post-coronavirus future It’s 2022. What Does Life Look Like? “It’s 2022, and the coronavirus has at long last been defeated. After a miserable year-and-a-half, alternating between lockdowns and new outbreaks, life can finally begin returning to normal. But it will not be the old normal. It will be a new world, with a reshaped economy, much as war and depression reordered life for previous generations. Thousands of stores and companies that were vulnerable before the virus arrived have disappeared. Dozens of colleges are shutting down, in the first wave of closures in the history of American higher education. People have also changed long-held patterns of behavior: Outdoor socializing is in, business trips are out. And American politics — while still divided in many of the same ways it was before the virus — has entered a new era. All of this, obviously, is conjecture. The future is unknowable. But the pandemic increasingly looks like one of the defining events of our time.” 2. Billy Bragg, musician and activist, in The Guardian on how speech is only free when everyone has a voice ‘Cancel culture’ doesn’t stifle debate, but it does challenge the old order See related Cartoon characters could be banned from junk food London Underground to consider ban on junk food adverts Children's online junk food ads banned by watchdog “The ability of middle-aged gatekeepers to control the agenda has been usurped by a new generation of activists who can spread information through their own networks, allowing them to challenge narratives promoted by the status quo. The great progressive movements of the 21st century have sprung from these networks: Black Lives Matter; #MeToo; Extinction Rebellion. While they may seem disparate in their aims, what they have in common is a demand for accountability. Although free speech remains the fundamental bedrock of a free society, for everyone to enjoy the benefits of freedom, liberty needs to be tempered by two further dimensions: equality and accountability. Without equality, those in power will use their freedom of expression to abuse and marginalise others. Without accountability, liberty can mutate into the most dangerous of all freedoms – impunity.” 3. Iain Martin in The Times on Rishi’s rapid rise Sunak’s road to No 10 gets bumpy from here “It is already possible to see how at some future critical moment in this pandemic, or when there is an electoral reverse or constitutional crisis, Mr Johnson could become the latest victim of Conservative Party ruthlessness. There are pitfalls for the chancellor, though. Mr Johnson is dangerously competitive. Soon, it will also be possible for opponents to label the chancellor Mr Unemployment. Often the Tory frontrunner doesn’t win and for all the spin that everything is lovely between Nos 10 and 11 right now, it won’t always be. A small but vicious band of Johnson ultra-loyalists will defend their man and their power. All that fun is to come. But it is worth pausing for a moment to admire the manner in which someone who just a year ago was serving as parliamentary under-secretary of state for local government rose to become the likely next prime minister.” 4. John T Bennett in The Independent on a president losing grip at the worst possible time I’ve documented Trump every day of his presidency — and now he’s in free-fall “The more Trump follows his instincts, the further he seems to fall. He has stumbled before during his term. But after watching every day of his presidency since he was sworn in on that grey day in January 2017, this correspondent sees a president in free-fall. He has no message for voters on why they should hand him a second term. His potential legal problems mounted Thursday when the Supreme Court ruled his office does not grant him automatic immunity from a Manhattan district attorney’s subpoena seeking his tax and financial records. His poll numbers are dismal. The virus is spreading again like wildfire. On issues from wearing masks to guard against Covid-carrying droplets ejected from our fellow humans to flying the Confederate flag to whether coronavirus is even that serious to the real state of the virus-hobbled economy, Trump’s know-it-all approach to life leaves him more and more isolated.” 5. Fraser Nelson in The Daily Telegraph on an obscured truth about Britain’s care chaos The real story behind Britain’s Covid care home crisis isn’t what you think “Care homes argue, still, that their business model depends on being able to pay people less than supermarkets do. Their complaint about Brexit, even now, is that it makes it harder for them to import cheap labour and keep wages down. Their bigger concern should be what the Covid crisis has shown about their ability to protect those in their care. Deciding what to do about care homes is, we’re told, high up on Boris Johnson’s list – but the more important point is what lessons can be learned now. If there is to be a second wave of Covid, it’s pretty clear what ought to happen: care home workers should be isolated and put up in a hotel if needs be. And – needless to say – forbidden from working from multiple homes. It will cost, but looking after the elderly can’t be done on the cheap. The last few months have proved, yet again, the real price of low-cost care.” UK News US Media Science & Health Politics Society Coronavirus Covid-19 Free speech Rishi Sunak Boris Johnson 10 Downing Street Donald Trump 2020 US election care homes#world_news
ამერიკის ხმა
Tbilisi, Georgia · 1 week ago
თეთრი სახლი ამერიკის დაზვერვას ინფორმაციის გაჟონვაში ადანაშაულებს
შეერთებული შტატების პრეზიდენტის ადმინისტრაციას ისევ უწევს პასუხების გაცემა ე.წ. რუსულ ჯილდოსთან დაკავშირებულ კითხვებზე. რამდენიმე საინფორმაციო საშუალების მიერ გავრცელებული ცნობების თანახმად, ავღანეთში დისლოცირებული ამერიკელი ჯარისკაცების მოკვლისთვის, რუსეთის სამხედრო დაზვერვას თალიბებისთვის ჯილდო ჰქონდა დაწესებული. ამერიკის პრეზიდენტი დონალდ ტრამპი აცხადებს, რომ ამის შესახებ მისთვის არავის არაფერი მოუხსენებია. "დაზვერვამ ახლა მაცნობა, რომ ეს მათ სარწმუნოდ არ ჩათვალეს, შესაბამისად არ მოგვახსენეს მე ან ვიცე-პრეზიდენტს " - ასეთი იყო პრეზიდენტის განმარტება კვირას, 28 ივნისს გაკეთებული განმარტება. თუმცა, მას შემდეგ "ნიუ-იორკ თაიმსში" კიდევ ერთი პუბლიკაცია გამოქვეყნდა. სამშაბათს, 30 ივნისს, გაზეთი წერდა, რომ შეერთებული შტატების დაზვერვამ დააფიქსირა დიდი თანხების მოძრაობის ფაქტი. იმავე პერიოდში, თანხა რუსეთის სამხედრო დაზვერვამ თალიბანთან ასოცირებულ პირებს გადაურიცხა. თეთრი სახლის პრესმდივანი ინფორმაციის გაჟონვაში დაზვერვის ოფიციალურ პირებს ადანაშაულებს. კეილი მაკენანმა გუშინ თქვა, რომ "დაზვერვის თაღლითი ოფიცრები" გადაუმოწმებელი ინფორმაციით, ამერიკელი ჯარისკაცების სიცოცხლეს ადგილზე დამატებით რისკებს უქმნიან. White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany speaks to the press on June 30, 2020, in the Brady Briefing Room of the White House in Washington. McEnany also used her opening comments to berate The New York Times, which first broke the story about allegations Russia offered bounties to Taliban fighters to kill U.S. and coalition troops in Afghanistan. "There is no good scenario as a result of this,” she told reporters. "Who's g მაკენანმა "ნიუ-იორკ თაიმსიც" გააკრიტიკა, რომელმაც პირველმა გამოაქვეყნა აღნიშნული ინფორმაცია. "ეს კარგს არაფერს მოიტანს" - უთხრა თეთრი სახლის პრესმდივანმა ჟურნალისტებს. "ვის მოიუნდება შეერთებული შტატების დაზვერვასთან თანამშრომლობა? ვინ მოისურვებს იყოს წყარო ან თანამშრომელი, როცა იციან, რომ მათი ვინაობა შეიძლება გაამხილონ" - ამბობს კეილი მაკენანი. თეთრი სახლის კომენტარების პარალელურად, ვრცელდებოდა ახალი ცნობები იმის შესახებ, რომ პრეზიდენტმა იცოდა ამერიკელების მოკვლისთვის რუსეთის მიერ ჯილდოს დაწესებაზე. საინფორმაციო საშუალებები წერენ, რომ პრეზიდენტ დონალდ ტრამპს შექმნილ ვითარებაზე წლის დასაწყისში წერილობით მოახსენეს. Media outlets, including The New York Times and CNN, reported some of the information on the alleged Russian plot had been included in the Presidential Daily Brief, a daily summary of the top intelligence issues, in late February. Other reports suggest Trump was given written information about the matter earlier this year. “The idea that somehow he didn’t know or isn’t being briefed, it is a dereliction of duty if that is the case,” Biden said, while taking questions from reporters after a speech in Wilmington, Delaware. Americans should "conclude that this man isn't fit to be president of the& United States of America,” he added. Other top Democrats also voiced frustration following briefings at the White House with Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe, National Security Adviser Robert O’Brien and White House chief of staff Mark Meadows. “Very concerning to me was that their initial response was that they just wanted to make sure we knew that the president didn’t know anything,” House Armed Services Committee Chairman, Rep. Adam Smith, told reporters. “That’s actually not normal.” “Based on what we heard today, it was information that (a), the president should have known about and (b), based on what we were told today, he did,” Smith added. Other senior Democratic lawmakers also expressed concerns about the administration’s handling of the intelligence and specifically, its inclination to downplay the possible consequences. “Nothing in the briefing that we have just received led me to believe it is a hoax,” said House Democratic leader Steny Hoyer. Other Democrats said they were more concerned about what happens next. Minority Leader Charles Schumer (D-NY) talks to reporters on April 21, 2020 in Washington. "Instead of dithering about what he knew, what he didn't know, he should have a plan,” said Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer. "And above all, go after [Russian President Vladimir] Putin." Despite the criticism, the White House and some Republican lawmakers insisted the handling of intelligence suggesting Russian agents were offering to pay for the deaths of U.S. and coalition forces in Afghanistan was handled properly. "What is briefed to the president is when there's a strategic decision to be made," McEnany said. "In this case, it was not briefed to the president. … It was not credible." Sen. Jim Inhofe, the Republican chair of the Senate Armed Services Committee, agreed. “There’s some confusion as far as our own intelligence, and it just didn’t rise to the level of the president at that time," he said. “Our intelligence agencies aren’t in complete agreement on this, even now." In a statement late Monday, the top Defense Department spokesman said that while officials there were aware of the intelligence, the Pentagon “has no corroborating evidence” to back up the initial intelligence reports. Still, the Pentagon said it took additional precautions to protect troops. Other top intelligence officials also suggested the unverified intelligence was shared across the U.S. intelligence community and with allies whose troops were potentially at risk. Additional media reports say intelligence about the alleged plot had been sent to the White House last year and focused on an April 2019 car bombing that killed three Marines. Some officials say Trump often does not read his daily briefing and instead prefers oral briefings several times a week. McEnany said Trump has now been briefed on “what's unfortunately in the public domain." “The president does read, and he also consumes intelligence verbally," she added. "This president, I will tell you, is the most informed person on planet Earth when it comes to the threats that we face."#ახალი_ამბები#აშშ#პოლიტიკა
The Guardian UK
London, United Kingdom · 16 hours ago
Check, Change, Go: what the UK government's latest slogan means for your holiday
Holidaymakers will soon face higher travel insurance charges and mobile phone costs, and tougher passport controls. Thank goodness for this three-word advice …Name: Holidays.Age: More than a thousand years.Wow! Did the Anglo-Saxons really take trips to Benidorm? Try to treat this seriously. Holiday is derived from the Old English word hāligdæg, meaning holy day. It was a day set aside for religious observance. The trips to Southend and beyond came later.And when did we stop taking them? That’s easier. In 2020, we abandoned holidays in the travel sense and went back to praying. Vacations out; vocations in.But seriously, do you think holidays are over? Well, the newspapers have pictures of the odd bikini-clad Brit sitting in splendid isolation beside a pool in Spain, but in reality people will be taking fewer foreign holidays this summer.Why? The information on which countries you can and can’t travel to without quarantining seems to change every day. Air travel is now even more unpleasant than before. And if you do manage to get to your four-star hotel in Ibiza, you’ll probably have to book for the pool and there will be no breakfast buffet.Oh well, it’ll have to be a staycation for me. That will please Boris Johnson, who says you will be doing your bit for the economy. But expect to have your temperature checked on arrival; there will be queues for the lift because numbers will be restricted; and you will be encouraged to eat in your room.Any other options? Adventurer and chief scout Bear Grylls is fronting a campaign to encourage children to camp out in their garden or a nearby park. It would at least be cheap. And I suppose you could have the breakfast buffet.OK, how much is a pop-up tent? I guess I’ll just have to wait until 2021 to go further afield. Indeed, but start planning now if you want to go anywhere in the EU. The government’s new Check, Change, Go ad campaign – how it loves those three-word slogans – is stressing the problems that will face holidaymakers after the end of the Brexit transition period in December. Such as? Higher travel insurance charges; higher mobile phone costs; tougher passport controls; long bureaucratic delays to get a pet passport.Project Fear? Project Reality!What does Check, Change, Go actually mean? It is being widely interpreted on social media. “Check what Boris Johnson said during the referendum campaign; change your plans to visit the EU; go back to the 1970s,” sums up the general mood.But I thought we were taking back control with an oven-ready deal that was going to save the NHS £350m a week and get us better terms than we ever had as members of the EU. You poor gullible fool. You need a holiday.Do say: “I hear New Malden is nice at this time of year.”Don’t say: “It’s two weeks in the Algarve for us this August as usual.” Continue reading...#european_union_holidays#travel#brexit #european_union
The Week UK
London, United Kingdom · 1 day ago
Ten Things You Need to Know Today: Monday 13 Jul 2020
Workers to self-isolate after 73 cases found at farm Around 200 workers have been told to self-isolate after 73 cases of Covid-19 were confirmed at a farm in Herefordshire. “Targeted action” is being taken against more than 100 local outbreaks of coronavirus every week, says Matt Hancock. Writing in the Daily Telegraph, the health secretary said increased testing meant officials could now be “targeted” in their response. Coronavirus immunity may be lost within months Covid-19 survivors may lose their immunity to the virus within months, according to new research. Scientists who analysed the immune response of more than 90 patients and healthcare workers at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS foundation trust found that while 60% of people had a “potent” antibody response at the height of their battle with the virus, only 17% retained it three months later. First federal execution in the US for 17 years due today The first federal execution in the US for more than 17 years is set to go ahead in Indiana today. The execution of Daniel Lewis Lee was blocked by a federal judge after relatives of the victims sought a delay, saying they feared attending in person could expose them to coronavirus. However, the appeal court ruled that no federal statute or regulation gave the victims the right to attend the execution. Exit polls show slim lead for Poland’s Andrzej Duda Poland’s incumbent president holds a slim lead after Sunday’s presidential election, according to three exit polls. A final exit poll on Monday suggested that Andrzej Duda took 51% of the vote. Duda had fought against the socially liberal Warsaw mayor, Rafal Trzaskowski. The BBC says the vote has been widely seen as a battle for the country’s future as well as its strained relations with the European Union. Bollywood hit by coronavirus as stars hospitalised The film industry in India has been hit by Covid-19 after several of Bollywood’s biggest stars were sent to hospital after testing positive for the virus. Amitabh Bachchan was in a “stable” condition in the isolation unit at Nanavati Hospital, and actress Aishwarya Rai Bachchan also entered hospital. Bachchan has made more than 180 films in a career spanning five decades. Government to warn Brits about post-Brexit travel costs The government is launching an information campaign with guidance about passports, travel insurance, mobile phone charges and travelling with pets after Brexit. The campaign - The UK’s new start: let’s get going - is aimed at raising awareness of higher costs, with travel insurance premiums expected to rise as eligibility for free healthcare in EU countries ends. The public will be told to check for mobile phone roaming charges in the EU. Iran report says human error led to Ukrainian jet being downed An official report has concluded that Iranian soldiers shot down a Ukrainian passenger jet because they forgot to calibrate their radar systems and mistakenly identified the aircraft as a threat. The Civil Aviation Organisation in Tehran said that the “human error” led to the accidental attack on the airliner in January, killing all 176 passengers and crew. Councils to cut costs after losing income from investments Local councils in England are set to shed thousands of jobs and cut services due to lost income from multibillion-pound holdings in office blocks, retail parks, airports and cinemas during the coronavirus pandemic. Local authorities had made an investment spree over the past four years as part of an effort to find alternative incomes and protect local services after deep austerity cuts by Conservative governments. John Lewis expected to reject Sunak’s bonus payment John Lewis is expected to reject a bonus funded by the taxpayer that could be worth £14 million. Its decision, which follows in the footsteps of Primark, could put pressure on other big employers to follow suit. Last week, Rishi Sunak said that the state would give companies £1,000 for every worker they brought back from furlough, provided they work for at least three months. Questions over Dominic Cummings' payment to AI firm A private firm owned and run by Dominic Cummings paid more than £250,000 to the artificial intelligence firm that worked on the Vote Leave campaign. The Downing Street adviser has refused to explain the reason for the payments to Faculty. Last week it was revealed that the Cabinet Office awarded an £840,000 contract to a company owned by a friend of Cummings.
Giorgi Gvajaia
Tbilisi, Georgia · 1 year ago
What is 5G technology? 👉🏻5G technology is the next generation in mobile networks. Like 3G and 4G before it, 5G is expected to be better and more powerful than what we’re used to. The new technology will use higher frequencies than the likes of 4G, offering more speed and higher bandwidth. 👉🏻If all goes well, 5G could potentially spell the end of Wi-Fi, particularly in public places, as the network will be strong enough to facilitate all the mobile internet browsing you could possibly want, from watching shows on Netflix to being able to scroll Instagram without interference. 👉🏻As well, because the network will have a bigger capacity than 4G, it means that thousands of devices in a small area can be connected at the same time. The other benefits 5G will bring👇🏻 With all these powerful internet connections around, it’s likely there will be even more internet of things (IoT) devices taking advantage of this. Driverless cars is one area where we could really see the benefit of better internet. According to the World Economic Forum: “By making driving, mapping and video data available in real-time, 5G will extend the ability of vehicles to perceive their environment beyond line of site, though robust vehicle to vehicle and vehicle to infrastructure connectivity to coordinate to improve traffic safety, efficiency, and flow.” 👉🏻Furthermore, 5G could even power things such as drones being used to deliver medical supplies. 👉🏻BT said 5G speeds can help with "advanced disaster recovery services using drones, such as delivery of equipment, medicine, food, water and blood." 👉🏻There are also some more general things 5G will improve in our day-to-day lives. According to O2’s smart cities report, 5G could save households up to £450 a year on bills ranging from energy to food and council. Things like smart fridges will reduce food bills, a 5G-enabled smart grid will cut down on your energy bills, and if councils take advantage of smart refuse collection, the costs saved here could be passed on to homes.
The Week UK
London, United Kingdom · 16 hours ago
Instant Opinion: Keir Starmer must offer more than ‘not being Jeremy Corbyn’
Your guide to the best columns and commentary on Monday 13 July Reaction The Week Staff Monday, July 13, 2020 - 2:20pm The Week’s daily round-up highlights the five best opinion pieces from across the British and international media, with excerpts from each. 1. Tom Harris in The Daily Telegraph on the first 100 days of the Labour leader After 100 days, Keir Starmer needs to offer voters more than ‘not being Jeremy Corbyn’ “The improvements he has made to his party’s – and his own – standing are real and important. That he has made mistakes along the way should hardly surprise anyone, although he needs to make fewer of them if he is to establish himself as a natural repository of anti-government support. Electorates have a nasty habit of making judgments about politicians in the very first few weeks of their tenure, and then refusing to reverse that judgment. The Covid lockdown may have given Starmer a longer period to bed in and might even allow him to have an effective relaunch on the other side of this crisis. From the perspective of a former member, Starmer represents a breath of fresh air for most Labour supporters after five fraught years. But a sense of relief won’t be enough for all those red wall voters, because – and I speak from experience – once you get out of the habit of voting Labour, it’s harder than you might expect to get back into it.” 2. Nesrine Malik in The Guardian in defence of those decried as ‘online mobs’ The ‘cancel culture’ war is really about old elites losing power in the social media age See related What is cancel culture? “Whenever I talk to people who are suddenly concerned about ‘cancel culture’ or ‘online mobs’, my first thought is always: ‘Where have you been for the last decade?’ I’ve been online long enough and, like many others, been receiving criticism and abuse online for long enough, to know that what some see as a new pattern of virtual censure by moral purists is mostly a story about the internet, not ideology or identity. If critics of ‘cancel culture’ are worried about opinions, posts and writings being constantly patrolled by a growing group of haters, then I am afraid they are extremely late to the party. I cannot remember a time where I have written or posted anything without thinking: ‘How many ways can this possibly be misconstrued, and can I defend it if it were?’ It’s not even a conscious thought process now, it’s instinct.” 3. Sean O’Grady in The Independent on the recovery of the British economy Forget global Britain - thanks to Brexit, coronavirus and a trade war with China, we’re losing our grip “There’s something heroic about Britain trying to chuck its weight around this way, and of course no one wants to do business with bullies and tyrants. But still, if the British economy is going to recover from the coronavirus-induced recession and go on to grow in the 2020s it will need its friends and its markets, and the British now seem to intent on blanking virtually everyone. The opportunities seem to be contracting rather than expanding. As everyone agrees, the UK is a great trading nation, and since before the industrial revolution has made its living from selling abroad, but the we don’t seem to be living up to the original hopes of ‘unleashing Britain’s potential’.” 4. John Prideaux, US editor of The Economist, in The Times on an abolitionist deserving of a pedestal A slavery statue we can all agree on: Frederick Douglass “On both sides of the Atlantic a great debate about statues is under way. So far the focus has mostly been on which lumps of bronze and marble should be removed by crane, or pushed into the harbour. There has been less discussion of what to do with all the empty plinths this creates. Yet putting up statues is fun. It is an opportunity to honour someone who should be universally admired and, therefore, to make a statement about what the society doing the putting up values. For those reasons Britain ought to have a statue of America’s greatest campaigner for the abolition of slavery, Frederick Douglass. Douglass had such an extraordinary life that the three autobiographies he wrote hardly seem sufficient.” 5. Nick Akerman, an assistant special prosecutor on the Watergate Special Prosecution Force, in The New York Times on the unfair fight set up for the special prosecutor Did Mueller Ever Stand a Chance Against Trump and Roger Stone? “From the start, Mr. Mueller was restrained by Justice Department regulations. He was barred, for example, from looking into the broader relationship between Mr. Trump and Russia through a review of Mr. Trump’s financial records and tax returns. Furthermore, according to the Mueller report, Mr. Trump made multiple attempts to fire the special counsel, and it is difficult, if not almost impossible, to conduct an investigation under those circumstances... Looking ahead, there needs to be a better mechanism in extraordinary circumstances - like Watergate and Russian interference in the 2016 election - that allows for the appointment of a truly independent special prosecutor. We were lucky to get the Mueller report, but Mr. Mueller was acting under restraints. Unfortunately history tells us that we will need special counsels in the years ahead, under extraordinary circumstances, and like we did with Watergate, that office should have true independence to protect our country and Constitution.” UK News US Russia Crime Science & Health Politics Society Law Keir Starmer Jeremy Corbyn Social media Boris Johnson Brexit slavery Donald Trump Russia US election 2016#world_news
Giorgi Gvajaia
Tbilisi, Georgia · 1 year ago
Automaker Daimler Says It Has No Idea How Kim Jong Un Got Hold of Its Armored Limos.🤔Read more 👇🏻 (TOKYO) — German automaker Daimler, which makes armored limousines used by North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, says it has no idea where he got them and has no business dealings with the North. Kim has raised eyebrows by using Daimler-branded stretch limousines at several very high-profile summits, including his meeting this week with Russian President Vladimir Putin and both of his earlier summits with President Donald Trump. The sale of luxury goods, including limousines, is banned under U. N. sanctions intended to put pressure on North Korea to abandon its nuclear weapons. Kim nevertheless had two limos waiting for him at Vladivostok station — a Mercedes Maybach S600 Pullman Guard and a Mercedes Maybach S62. He is believed to have also used the S600 Pullman Guard for his summits with Trump in Singapore in June last year and in Hanoi in February. “We have absolutely no idea how those vehicles were delivered to North Korea,” Daimler spokeswoman Silke Mockert said in a written response to an Associated Press report Wednesday on the limousines . “For Daimler, the correct export of products in conformance with the law is a fundamental principle of responsible entrepreneurial activity.” Daimler, based in Stuttgart, Germany, is one of the world’s biggest and more prestigious automobile companies. It is one of the biggest providers of high-end passenger cars and the world’s largest producer of trucks above 6 tons. On its home page, the multinational giant boasts of selling vehicles and services in nearly all the countries of the world and of having production facilities in Europe, North and South America, Asia and Africa. North Korea, however, isn’t one of its official customers. “Our company has had no business connections with North Korea for far more than 15 years now and strictly complies with E.U. and U.S. embargoes,” she said. “To prevent deliveries to North Korea and to any of its embassies worldwide, Daimler has implemented a comprehensive export control process. Sales of vehicles by third parties, especially of used vehicles, are beyond our control and responsibility.” Kim’s ability to procure the limousines anyway is a good example of how porous the international sanctions tend to be. According to Daimler, the Mercedes-Benz Pullman limousines offer their passengers “a superbly appointed setting for discreet meetings.” The version used by Kim is believed to be equipped with all the key communications and entertainment systems so that, according to a company description of the car, its occupants can remain “fully in touch with the rest of the world while enjoying the luxury and comfort of their own very special place in it.”