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Georgia Today
Tsalenjikha · 1 year ago

✅ Turkish actor, Çağatay Ulusoy will attend a charity evening in Tbilisi on 10th May, that is held by the Monk Andrews Foundation, helping children with cancer.

🎤 According to the famous Georgian singer Nini Badurashvili, besides Çağatay, Lela Tsurtsumia, Anri Jokhadze, Eka Kahiani, and Christina Imedadze will also take part in the concert.

The evening will be held in the restaurant “ეთნო წისქვილში” / Ethno Tsiskvili. All funds raised will be used to treat children with cancer.


Georgia Today
Tsalenjikha · 1 year ago
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The Week UK
London, United Kingdom · 1 day ago
Ten Things You Need to Know Today: Monday 13 Jul 2020
Workers to self-isolate after 73 cases found at farm Around 200 workers have been told to self-isolate after 73 cases of Covid-19 were confirmed at a farm in Herefordshire. “Targeted action” is being taken against more than 100 local outbreaks of coronavirus every week, says Matt Hancock. Writing in the Daily Telegraph, the health secretary said increased testing meant officials could now be “targeted” in their response. Coronavirus immunity may be lost within months Covid-19 survivors may lose their immunity to the virus within months, according to new research. Scientists who analysed the immune response of more than 90 patients and healthcare workers at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS foundation trust found that while 60% of people had a “potent” antibody response at the height of their battle with the virus, only 17% retained it three months later. First federal execution in the US for 17 years due today The first federal execution in the US for more than 17 years is set to go ahead in Indiana today. The execution of Daniel Lewis Lee was blocked by a federal judge after relatives of the victims sought a delay, saying they feared attending in person could expose them to coronavirus. However, the appeal court ruled that no federal statute or regulation gave the victims the right to attend the execution. Exit polls show slim lead for Poland’s Andrzej Duda Poland’s incumbent president holds a slim lead after Sunday’s presidential election, according to three exit polls. A final exit poll on Monday suggested that Andrzej Duda took 51% of the vote. Duda had fought against the socially liberal Warsaw mayor, Rafal Trzaskowski. The BBC says the vote has been widely seen as a battle for the country’s future as well as its strained relations with the European Union. Bollywood hit by coronavirus as stars hospitalised The film industry in India has been hit by Covid-19 after several of Bollywood’s biggest stars were sent to hospital after testing positive for the virus. Amitabh Bachchan was in a “stable” condition in the isolation unit at Nanavati Hospital, and actress Aishwarya Rai Bachchan also entered hospital. Bachchan has made more than 180 films in a career spanning five decades. Government to warn Brits about post-Brexit travel costs The government is launching an information campaign with guidance about passports, travel insurance, mobile phone charges and travelling with pets after Brexit. The campaign - The UK’s new start: let’s get going - is aimed at raising awareness of higher costs, with travel insurance premiums expected to rise as eligibility for free healthcare in EU countries ends. The public will be told to check for mobile phone roaming charges in the EU. Iran report says human error led to Ukrainian jet being downed An official report has concluded that Iranian soldiers shot down a Ukrainian passenger jet because they forgot to calibrate their radar systems and mistakenly identified the aircraft as a threat. The Civil Aviation Organisation in Tehran said that the “human error” led to the accidental attack on the airliner in January, killing all 176 passengers and crew. Councils to cut costs after losing income from investments Local councils in England are set to shed thousands of jobs and cut services due to lost income from multibillion-pound holdings in office blocks, retail parks, airports and cinemas during the coronavirus pandemic. Local authorities had made an investment spree over the past four years as part of an effort to find alternative incomes and protect local services after deep austerity cuts by Conservative governments. John Lewis expected to reject Sunak’s bonus payment John Lewis is expected to reject a bonus funded by the taxpayer that could be worth £14 million. Its decision, which follows in the footsteps of Primark, could put pressure on other big employers to follow suit. Last week, Rishi Sunak said that the state would give companies £1,000 for every worker they brought back from furlough, provided they work for at least three months. Questions over Dominic Cummings' payment to AI firm A private firm owned and run by Dominic Cummings paid more than £250,000 to the artificial intelligence firm that worked on the Vote Leave campaign. The Downing Street adviser has refused to explain the reason for the payments to Faculty. Last week it was revealed that the Cabinet Office awarded an £840,000 contract to a company owned by a friend of Cummings.
Georgia Today
Tbilisi, Georgia · 1 year ago
David Garrett, famous violinist will hold a concert in Georgia. The musician will appear in front of the Georgian audience with a new album “UNLIMITED –LIVE 2019”. The concert will be held at the Tbilisi Sports Palace on September 13. Tickets to attend the concert will be sold starting 20:00, May 23 and will cost from 80 up to 250 GEL.
Giorgi Gvajaia
Tbilisi, Georgia · 1 year ago
ძალიან საყურადღებო თემა❗️❗️❗️ მე, პირადად, შემეძლო ნახევარი თბილისის მობილურების პაროლები მცოდნოდა იმდენის აკრეფის პროცესი მინახავს ჩემდა უნებურად...ასევე მინახავს სხვის ჩათში გულებისა💘 და კოცნების💋გაგზავნის პროცესი...გამღიმებია 🙃 მეტი ყურადღებაა საჭირო, მაგალითად: 📌კინოში ყოფნისას, როცა უკანა რიგიდან გაკვირდებიან.... 📌ტრანსპორტში, როცა თავზე გადგათ თქვენთვის უცნობი მგზავრი.... 📌პიკის საათის დროს, როცა ლამის კეფასთან სუნთქავს უცხო ადამიანი... 📌 თუნდაც დახურულ საჯარო სივრცეში - შიდა სათვალთვალო კამერების ხედვის არეალში და ა.შ. ზოგადად, ციფრული ტექნოლოგიების ერაში, განსაკუთრებულად უნდა გავუფრთხილდეთ ჩვენს პერსონალურ მონაცემებს❗️❗️❗️ - - - This photographer captured shots of people texting their most intimate secrets in public — and it's a compelling insight into human nature👇🏻 If you've ever commuted on New York's subways in rush hour traffic, you may have found your eyes drifting to the open cellphone of the person seated beside you. This total stranger and fellow commuter might be texting a friend about dinner plans. They might be reading a book on their phone. They might be watching a movie, or browsing the web, or scrolling through Spotify. But other times, you'll find that the person seated beside you— their cellphone held out openly in their hand for all to see — is engaged in an activity that's a tad more intimate than dinner plans. Sometimes, you'll find that the person is sexting, or sending deeply personal text messages, or browsing Tinder, or sending dick picks. As a New York commuter, I've seen all of the above. Often, I've found it difficult to look away. New York-based photographer Jeff Mermelstein also has trouble looking away. Mermelstein has dedicated a large part of his street photography to capturing these intimate, fleeting messages. The images reveal deeply personal messages taken when the subject is unaware. Closely cropped, the photos reveal few identifying details other than a lacquered fingernail or a hand tattoo. "She likes ruff [sic] sex," one person types out. "Trust me we look like our pics for sure," writes another. "Tell your lady my wife has the same desire she has." Other messages are more emotionally wrought. "This past weekend I did Ayahuasca and you came up," a person writes. "It's taken me all week to figure out how I deeply regret not taking ownership for my actions and in hindsight I treated you with extreme disregard." "Start your chemotherapy from tomorrow, please," another message reads. "I know this is very unfair of life. I wish I could do something to take away your pain abd [sic] sickness...if I could I would do anything to save you."
Gela Skhulukhia
Dublin, Ireland · 10 months ago
Travel Traveler article - Georgia - Natural Diamonds Georgia - Natural Diamond - an article by the influential American publication Traveler. According to the author of the publication, "Georgia is emerging as the most attractive and promising tourist destination in the world." "Georgia's mountains, temples, and vibrant capital make the visit to this country like a hidden gem," Traveler writes. The article describes in detail the places to visit during your visit to Georgia. Among them is Tbilisi. Traveler advises readers to take a walk in the historic center of the Georgian capital, which will "help tourists feel the rhythm and contrast of the city." “Tbilisi is a mix of styles, a city where the past and the present blend in. Tbilisi may deceive you, but it takes a few days to see everything and see the atmosphere in a small town, ”the article reads. Traveler's recommendation is to visit David Gareji, Gori, Borjomi and Poti. “The most famous of Georgia's resorts is Borjomi. It is famous for its mineral water, which you will find in every store in the country, ”writes the Spanish edition. Mestia has a special place in the article. “The road is not easy. Crossing the sloping slopes to reach Mestia takes several hours and good tires. But a visit to Mestia is an invaluable pleasure. When you move to Svaneti, you are in the middle of the Caucasus and watching the highest peaks in Europe, "Traveler writes. The author of the article also advises tourists visiting Georgia to taste local cuisine. "Khinkali, khachapuri, as well as a mix of beans and walnuts - but this is already a gastronomy, which I would dedicate to another article."
Georgia Today
Tbilisi, Georgia · 1 year ago
📚 Books Reading Festival will be held tomorrow, on May 11 at Lisi Lake in Tbilisi. The event is organized by the Georgian First Channel project “Bookshelf”. The festival doors open at 12:00. 🎙 Guests will be able to read in a comfortable environment in nature, visit the “Bookshelf” reading spaces, request or exchange books and get information on literature; In addition, attend master classes, engage in the unprecedented flash mob of book-reading, play the “bookshelf” and win various prizes. The live concert will wrap up the Books Reading Festival. Beka Adamashvili, Aleko Shugladze and Levan Gigineishvili will conduct Master Classes. “Ambavi”, Luka Zakariadze, “LOUDspeakers” will perform on the stage. Books Reading Festival will be held annually. ☝🏼Admission is free.
The Week UK
London, United Kingdom · 1 day ago
Debate: can big countries eliminate coronavirus without a vaccine?
Description Four experts on whether immunity without a vaccine is a realistic goal Credits Olga Maltseva/AFP/Getty Alt Text A coronavirus vaccine research lab in Russia Four experts on whether immunity without a vaccine is a realistic goal In Depth The Week Staff Monday, July 13, 2020 - 10:14am Angharad Davies, Swansea University; Andrew Lee, University of Sheffield; Jimmy Whitworth, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine; Lakshmi Manoharan, University of Oxford The UK should change its Covid-19 strategy to try to eliminate Covid-19 even without a vaccine rather than simply managing the disease, according to Independent SAGE, a group of scientists set up as an alternative to the government’s advisory body. New Zealand has effectively managed to eliminate the virus, but can states with much larger, denser populations that have experienced much bigger outbreaks hope to do the same? Or is it more realistic to accept that the disease is likely to continue to circulate at some level and plan for that? We asked four experts for their views. Angharad Davies, clinical associate professor in microbiology at Swansea University Elimination or near-elimination in the UK would require ambition and huge effort, organisation and resource but I believe it is possible. The effort would mean accepting fewer freedoms in the medium term. Crucially, it would rely on trust in authority and willingness to comply with restrictions. The incentive would be that, if we achieved elimination, we could go back to a state closer to normal, and a healthier local economy even without a vaccine. The effort would have to be sustained until then, and if no effective vaccine transpires – which is possible – then the question is how long this approach could justifiably continue in the face of a virus endemic globally. Lakshmi Manoharan, medical epidemiologist at the University of Oxford Suppressing the virus to a low level before allowing economic and social activity to resume as normal is important. Doing otherwise will risk the possibility of the UK having to go in and out of lockdown numerous times. That would be more harmful for society and the economy, compared to implementing more stringent measures in the short term. Recent studies have shown that the number of people with Covid-19 antibodies in coronavirus hotspots such as Wuhan and Spain is still low. This means that despite high numbers of cases and extensive community transmission, the majority of the population is still susceptible to the virus. Allowing economic and social life to resume while this is the case and in the absence of a vaccine may lead to a larger second wave of infection. The emphasis should be on strong measures such as border quarantines and a robust test, trace and isolate system to reduce infection rates before relaxing economic measures, opening schools and allowing “air bridges”. We need to focus on reducing the amount of community transmission first, which allows for spread of infection into our most vulnerable populations. Jimmy Whitworth, professor of international public health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine See related Coronavirus: the vaccines on trial - and when they may be ready Coronavirus: why antibody rates vary so widely from place to place Herd immunity doubts as Spanish study finds just 5% of population have Covid antibodies We need a sense of proportion in countries that have reduced the total mortality rate to normal levels, as the UK has now done, showing that the first peak of the epidemic has passed. Once the number of new cases is under good control (one new case a day for every million of population is reasonable) we can allow social and economic life to resume. We can also shift more attention to general physical and mental health. We need to continue to maintain some physical distancing measures, combined with effective testing and contract tracing to prevent the inevitable clusters expanding into a second wave. But to try to eliminate all cases, and to sustain a zero-Covid state, would take enormous resources. This would produce diminishing returns as the number of cases goes down – and other aspects of life would suffer. We have seen this with countries attempting polio elimination, where routine health services may suffer, and with malaria elimination where the cost of averting each case rapidly increases as the number of cases goes down. Getting the number of cases down to manageable levels might eventually lead to zero cases temporarily, but we do not currently have effective measures to keep it at zero. In particular, border quarantines are not likely to be effective unless rigorously and universally applied with consequent disruption of all business travel, tourism and international trade. Border quarantine won’t be effective unless it is universal. Nick Ansell/PA Wire/PA Images Andrew Lee, reader in global public health at the University of Sheffield Elimination of Covid-19 in high-income countries is both possible and realistic. Ebola elimination was achieved in parts of Africa through disease control measures rather than a vaccine, including disease surveillance, infection control, changing social norms (for example around physical contact) and public communications. This demonstrates elimination is possible even in low and middle-income countries with fewer resources. The key determinants, as with all infectious disease control programmes, are the political and societal will to achieve this. Because it requires a multi-pronged approach, it needs resourcing, leadership and commitment to deliver. So the question becomes: “What are we prepared to pay or sacrifice to achieve this?” But in our interconnected globalised world it is not enough to eliminate the virus in just a few countries. Countries where the disease is endemic act as reservoirs of infection and can reinfect others. This is a global health threat that requires global leadership and coordinated action if we are to eliminate it. Angharad Davies, clinical associate professor at the Swansea University; Andrew Lee, reader in global public health at the University of Sheffield; Jimmy Whitworth, professor of international public health at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine; Lakshmi Manoharan, medical epidemiologist at the University of Oxford This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. UK News World News Politics Society Coronavirus Covid-19 Vaccines Lockdown vaccine #science_&_health
Keso Bigvava
Tbilisi, Georgia · 3 months ago
A letter to the UK from Italy: this is what we know about your future
The acclaimed Italian novelist Francesca Melandri, who has been under lockdown in Rome for almost three weeks due to the Covid-19 outbreak, has written a letter to fellow Europeans “from your future”, laying out the range of emotions people are likely to go through over the coming weeks. I am writing to you from Italy, which means I am writing from your future. We are now where you will be in a few days. The epidemic’s charts show us all entwined in a parallel dance. We are but a few steps ahead of you in the path of time, just like Wuhan was a few weeks ahead of us. We watch you as you behave just as we did. You hold the same arguments we did until a short time ago, between those who still say “it’s only a flu, why all the fuss?” and those who have already understood. Coronavirus: the week explained - sign up for our email newsletter Read more As we watch you from here, from your future, we know that many of you, as you were told to lock yourselves up into your homes, quoted Orwell, some even Hobbes. But soon you’ll be too busy for that. First of all, you’ll eat. Not just because it will be one of the few last things that you can still do. You’ll find dozens of social networking groups with tutorials on how to spend your free time in fruitful ways. You will join them all, then ignore them completely after a few days. You’ll pull apocalyptic literature out of your bookshelves, but will soon find you don’t really feel like reading any of it. You’ll eat again. You will not sleep well. You will ask yourselves what is happening to democracy. You’ll have an unstoppable online social life – on Messenger, WhatsApp, Skype, Zoom… Advertisement You will miss your adult children like you never have before; the realisation that you have no idea when you will ever see them again will hit you like a punch in the chest. Old resentments and falling-outs will seem irrelevant. You will call people you had sworn never to talk to ever again, so as to ask them: “How are you doing?” Many women will be beaten in their homes. You will wonder what is happening to all those who can’t stay home because they don’t have one. You will feel vulnerable when going out shopping in the deserted streets, especially if you are a woman. You will ask yourselves if this is how societies collapse. Does it really happen so fast? You’ll block out these thoughts and when you get back home you’ll eat again. You will put on weight. You’ll look for online fitness training. You’ll laugh. You’ll laugh a lot. You’ll flaunt a gallows humour you never had before. Even people who’ve always taken everything dead seriously will contemplate the absurdity of life, of the universe and of it all. You will make appointments in the supermarket queues with your friends and lovers, so as to briefly see them in person, all the while abiding by the social distancing rules. You will count all the things you do not need. The true nature of the people around you will be revealed with total clarity. You will have confirmations and surprises. Literati who had been omnipresent in the news will disappear, their opinions suddenly irrelevant; some will take refuge in rationalisations which will be so totally lacking in empathy that people will stop listening to them. People whom you had overlooked, instead, will turn out to be reassuring, generous, reliable, pragmatic and clairvoyant. Those who invite you to see all this mess as an opportunity for planetary renewal will help you to put things in a larger perspective. You will also find them terribly annoying: nice, the planet is breathing better because of the halved CO2 emissions, but how will you pay your bills next month? You will not understand if witnessing the birth of a new world is more a grandiose or a miserable affair. You will play music from your windows and lawns. When you saw us singing opera from our balconies, you thought “ah, those Italians”. But we know you will sing uplifting songs to each other too. And when you blast I Will Survive from your windows, we’ll watch you and nod just like the people of Wuhan, who sung from their windows in February, nodded while watching us.#Many of you will fall asleep vowing that the very first thing you’ll do as soon as lockdown is over is file for divorce. Many children will be conceived. Your children will be schooled online. They’ll be horrible nuisances; they’ll give you joy. Elderly people will disobey you like rowdy teenagers: you’ll have to fight with them in order to forbid them from going out, to get infected and die. You will try not to think about the lonely deaths inside the ICU. You’ll want to cover with rose petals all medical workers’ steps. You will be told that society is united in a communal effort, that you are all in the same boat. It will be true. This experience will change for good how you perceive yourself as an individual part of a larger whole.#italyItaly
The Week UK
London, United Kingdom · 3 days ago
Racism claims and officers convicted of crimes: is UK policing due an overhaul?
Description Watchdog to investigate use of force against BAME groups as separate probe reveals criminal offenders in forces nationwide Credits Alex Pantling/Getty Images Alt Text Police Watchdog to investigate use of force against BAME groups as separate probe reveals criminal offenders in forces nationwide In Depth James Ashford Friday, July 10, 2020 - 2:29pm Hundreds of serving police officers in the UK have convictions for criminal offences including assault, burglary and drug possession, an investigation has revealed. Police forces across the country employ at least 211 officers and police community support officers (PCSOs) who have been found guilty of crimes, according to Freedom of Information (FOI) data obtained by Sky News. The publication of the figures comes a day after reports that police in England and Wales are to face an inquiry to establish whether officers racially discriminate against ethnic minorities in their use of force and of stop and search. For which crimes have officers been convicted? The National Police Chiefs’ Council (NPCC) told Sky News that having a criminal record has “never been an automatic bar to joining the police”, and insisted officers are vetted “throughout their service”. Some officers have also been allowed to continue serving after being convicted while employed by forces. Their crimes include causing death by careless driving, assault and possession of a firearm. And although only 211 officers are known to have convictions, the real number is likely to be much higher. Only 16 of the UK’s 45 territorial police forces responded to the FOI requests, “with many claiming it would cost too much to retrieve the information”, the broadcaster reports. Among those that responded, North Wales Police admitted that 20 of its police officers and five PCSOs have criminal convictions, including assault, drug possession and cruelty to animals. The Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) said 99 serving officers had received criminal convictions while employed by the force, for offences including death by careless driving, assault, harassment and possession of a firearm/drunk in charge of a firearm. See related Cartoon characters could be banned from junk food London Underground to consider ban on junk food adverts Children's online junk food ads banned by watchdog Offences by Kent Police officers include assault, criminal damage and drink driving - with five of those convicted ranked “inspector or above”. Other crimes by officers in police forces including Avon and Somerset, Dorset, Norfolk, Cheshire, and Devon and Cornwall include burglary, theft, obtaining money by deception, battery, possessing an imitation firearm in a public place, and data protection offences. And the racism inquiry? The Independent Office for Police Conduct (IOPC) is to investigate cases involving the use of force and stop and search to determine whether any racial discrimination was in play, according to The Guardian. The police watchdog said said it would look for “trends and patterns which might help drive real change” and “investigat[e] more cases where racial discrimination may be a factor in order to develop a body of evidence to identify systemic issues which should be addressed”, the newspaper reports. The inquiry comes amid renewed scrutiny on police forces worldwide in the wake of the killing of African-American man George Floyd during an arrest in Minnesota in May. Police officers in England and Wales have repeatedly been accused of using stop and search powers disproportionately against black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) people. According to an analysis of Home Office internal data last year, black people are 40 times more likely than white people to be stopped and searched by police in the UK. The IOPC will also examine whether BAME people are being failed as victims of crime. Are these policing problems new? Although the protests triggered by Floyd’s death have fuelled calls to combat alleged racism within police forces, such accusations are by no means new. “The policing of black British culture claims a long history”, wrote Lambros Fatsis, a lecturer in sociology and criminology at Southampton University, in a 2018 article on The Conversation. “It might take another Black Lives Matter moment to wake up to police racism and recognise that when policing is part of the problem, it can’t also be the solution to violent crime,” Fatsis predicted. The Metropolitan Police force was infamously branded “institutionally racist” back in 1999 by retired High Court judge William Macpherson, who led the public inquiry into the fatal stabbing of black teenager Stephen Lawrence in 1993. Little appears to have changed in the ensuing decades. The Met “receives more than 250 complaints alleging racism on average each year and less than 1% are upheld”, The Guardian reports. Is it time for an overhaul of UK policing? Police forces across the UK are under pressure to prove that they have listened to the voices of Black Lives Matter protestors. Confirming the upcoming IOPC inquiry, due to begin this autumn, the watchdog’s director general Michael Lockwood said: “Evidence of disproportionality in the use of police powers has long been a concern which impacts on confidence in policing, particularly in the BAME communities.” Experts say changing the way that officers work - whether through more socially conscious community policing strategies, better training and education, or changes to recruitment policies - is key to regaining public confidence in police. The IOPC vowed that “it would not shy away from any conclusion if it found evidence to support it, including that systemic racism was at play”, The Guardian reports. “We can then see if there is a need to change policing policy or practice,” Lockwood said. Crime Law Police racism Black Lives Matter#uk_news
The Week UK
London, United Kingdom · 18 hours ago
Are millennials really an ‘infantilised generation’ - and if so, why?
Description New book argues that lack of moral boundaries has created ‘disoriented’ generation and fuelled identity politics Credits Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty Images Alt Text A woman at Disneyland Shanghai New book argues that lack of moral boundaries has created ‘disoriented’ generation and fuelled identity politics In Depth Arion McNicoll Monday, July 13, 2020 - 4:12pm A whole generation have been “infantilised” and left without “self-sufficiency and intellectual independence” as a result of their parents’ failure to enforce boundaries, according to a new book by a leading sociology professor. Frank Furedi argues that millennials - people born between 1981 and 1996 - have been “disorientated” by this lack of discipline and that as a result, the transition to adulthood “takes much, much longer than ever before”. So are millennials living an extended childhood? Over the course of three or four generations, boundaries for children have been gradually taken down, claims Furedi, the emeritus professor of sociology at Kent University, in his book Why Borders Matter. “Children develop by reacting against those lines, the boundaries that are set, and that is a very creative process to gain self-sufficiency and intellectual independence,” he writes. Yet young people today “are kicking against open doors”, according to the academic. “The whole developmental process becomes compromised and you do end up with a situation where the transition from childhood to adolescence takes much, much longer than ever before and the transition from adolescence to adulthood also takes much longer.” See related What is cancel culture? Furedi’s claims about delayed adulthood appear to be backed up by data published by the Office for National Statistics last year that shows many key milestones are occurring later in life. British people are starting full-time work, moving out of their parents’ homes, marrying, and having children later than any previous generation since records begans. So are parents entirely to blame? A failure to reach an age-appropriate level of maturity can be the result of “unmanageable stress or trauma”, but can also occur “society-wide”, says Simon Gottschalk, a professor of sociology at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Famous socialogists including Herbert Marcuse and Erich Fromm have suggested that “like individuals – a society can also suffer from arrested development”, Gottschalk writes in an article on The Conversation. Today, infantilisation is present not only in people’s approach to parenting, but also in an education system where students are constantly monitored and spoon-fed information, and even in workplaces where managers electronically keep tabs on their employees, Gottschalk argues. He also points to “infantilist trends in language” and in “popular culture – in the shorter sentences in contemporary novels, in the lack of sophistication in political rhetoric and in sensationalist cable news coverage”. When did it begin? The idea that young people are failing to mature quickly enough is nothing new, says Vice writer Leah Mandel. “In fact, it’s been going on since at least as far back as the 1960s, when former Vogue editor-in-chief Diana Vreeland coined the term ‘youthquake’ to describe the ‘childlike’ mod dresses and mini-skirts of the Beatlemania era,” Mandel writes. In time, the idea became a self-fulfilling prophecy, with “fashion and beauty media latch[ing] onto the idea that what is young, or what the young like, is inevitably going to sell”. “Brands started marketing their inventory as a way of preserving one’s youth and cool. The youthquake never ended,” Mandel says. And the impact? The results, according to Furedi, are manifold. As well as creating a culture where parents aim to be friends with their children rather than authority figures, he argues, the infantilisation of millennials has also fuelled identity politics. In an inherent paradox, the dismantling of moral boundaries has resulted in a generation that abhors those who make moral judgments, leaving millennials to create borders of their own - which in turn, creates a judgmental breed of identity politics, Furedi claims. “The thing about identity politics is that every expression they use is actually a contradiction,” he writes. “They talk about diversity - that’s one of the key values of identity politics - but identity politics is totally hostile to a diversity of viewpoints. So if you argue a different narrative to what they are arguing, that is seen as racist, as offensive, as hate.” World News Science & Health millennials Identity politics #society
The Week UK
London, United Kingdom · 22 hours ago
Behind Britain’s ‘shock and awe’ Brexit campaign
Description Tourists will be warned of higher costs as businesses told to prepare for more paperwork Credits Chris J Ratcliffe/Getty Images Alt Text Michael Gove Tourists will be warned of higher costs as businesses told to prepare for more paperwork In Depth Holden Frith Monday, July 13, 2020 - 11:20am Boris Johnson’s government will urge the UK to prepare for the “changes and opportunities” of Brexit in a £93m campaign to draw attention to the consequences of leaving the EU. Behavioural scientists have been called in to draw up a “shock and awe” programme of messages intended to provoke action from businesses and the broader public. “The term, more often used to describe a military strategy of overwhelming force and closely associated with the Iraq War, is contained in a document setting out the government’s communications plan,” Politico says. Although the UK formally left the EU on 31 January, little has changed since. Officials fear this status quo has led to complacency about the expiry of the transition deal on 31 December. “A lack of readiness among businesses for the end of the Brexit transition period is a major concern for the UK government,” says Bloomberg. “If companies aren’t prepared for new paperwork requirements and red tape, which will apply whether there is a UK-EU trade deal or not, there is a risk of border disruption and goods being held up at ports.” The advertising campaign will also target Europe-bound tourists. See related Coronavirus: is it safe to travel without insurance? Why Boris Johnson’s Brexit border plan is causing cabinet concern Britain to seek membership of Pacific trade bloc - but what is it? “Adverts bearing the strapline ‘Check, Change, Go’ will be launched today and texts sent to mobile phones,” says The Times. “Much of the information is aimed at raising awareness of higher costs, with travel insurance premiums expected to rise once eligibility for free healthcare in EU countries ends.” Holidaymakers will also be warned that their passports will need to be valid for at least six months beyond their trip. Anyone wanting to take a pet to an EU country is advised to start planning four months in advance. Cabinet Secretary Michael Gove (pictured above) said yesterday that companies and individuals should be “ready to hit the ground running” when the transition deal ends. “This will bring changes and significant opportunities for which we all need to prepare,” he added. “The upbeat message about the coming freedom from Brussels features a new ‘Check, Change, Go’ logo to raise awareness of the new border rules,” says the Daily Express. “We like the positivity of the campaign,” the newspaper continues, “and we hope that even die-hard Remainers will swing behind the historic decision taken by the British electorate back in 2016.” But “‘shock and awe’ is not a phrase of comfort,” says Prospect magazine. Instead, it’s one that reminds us of a campaign “to overwhelm and subdue a military opponent”. Yet this campaign will be waged “not on a foreign belligerent, but on its own people” - and will provide more evidence that “a project designed to enhance prosperity, democracy and national pride [has] destroyed all three”, the magazine concludes. UK News Europe Business UK business Boris Johnson Michael Gove EU#politics