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Tin Tin
Tbilisi · 4 months ago

When you listen to Eminem the whole day, like you used to do when you were 14 years old 😄

#stillmyfavoriterapper #music

Eminem - Not Afraid (Official Video)
youtu.be
Tin Tin
Tbilisi · 4 months ago
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Keso Bigvava
Tbilisi, Georgia · 3 months ago
A letter to the UK from Italy: this is what we know about your future
The acclaimed Italian novelist Francesca Melandri, who has been under lockdown in Rome for almost three weeks due to the Covid-19 outbreak, has written a letter to fellow Europeans “from your future”, laying out the range of emotions people are likely to go through over the coming weeks. I am writing to you from Italy, which means I am writing from your future. We are now where you will be in a few days. The epidemic’s charts show us all entwined in a parallel dance. We are but a few steps ahead of you in the path of time, just like Wuhan was a few weeks ahead of us. We watch you as you behave just as we did. You hold the same arguments we did until a short time ago, between those who still say “it’s only a flu, why all the fuss?” and those who have already understood. Coronavirus: the week explained - sign up for our email newsletter Read more As we watch you from here, from your future, we know that many of you, as you were told to lock yourselves up into your homes, quoted Orwell, some even Hobbes. But soon you’ll be too busy for that. First of all, you’ll eat. Not just because it will be one of the few last things that you can still do. You’ll find dozens of social networking groups with tutorials on how to spend your free time in fruitful ways. You will join them all, then ignore them completely after a few days. You’ll pull apocalyptic literature out of your bookshelves, but will soon find you don’t really feel like reading any of it. You’ll eat again. You will not sleep well. You will ask yourselves what is happening to democracy. You’ll have an unstoppable online social life – on Messenger, WhatsApp, Skype, Zoom… Advertisement You will miss your adult children like you never have before; the realisation that you have no idea when you will ever see them again will hit you like a punch in the chest. Old resentments and falling-outs will seem irrelevant. You will call people you had sworn never to talk to ever again, so as to ask them: “How are you doing?” Many women will be beaten in their homes. You will wonder what is happening to all those who can’t stay home because they don’t have one. You will feel vulnerable when going out shopping in the deserted streets, especially if you are a woman. You will ask yourselves if this is how societies collapse. Does it really happen so fast? You’ll block out these thoughts and when you get back home you’ll eat again. You will put on weight. You’ll look for online fitness training. You’ll laugh. You’ll laugh a lot. You’ll flaunt a gallows humour you never had before. Even people who’ve always taken everything dead seriously will contemplate the absurdity of life, of the universe and of it all. You will make appointments in the supermarket queues with your friends and lovers, so as to briefly see them in person, all the while abiding by the social distancing rules. You will count all the things you do not need. The true nature of the people around you will be revealed with total clarity. You will have confirmations and surprises. Literati who had been omnipresent in the news will disappear, their opinions suddenly irrelevant; some will take refuge in rationalisations which will be so totally lacking in empathy that people will stop listening to them. People whom you had overlooked, instead, will turn out to be reassuring, generous, reliable, pragmatic and clairvoyant. Those who invite you to see all this mess as an opportunity for planetary renewal will help you to put things in a larger perspective. You will also find them terribly annoying: nice, the planet is breathing better because of the halved CO2 emissions, but how will you pay your bills next month? You will not understand if witnessing the birth of a new world is more a grandiose or a miserable affair. You will play music from your windows and lawns. When you saw us singing opera from our balconies, you thought “ah, those Italians”. But we know you will sing uplifting songs to each other too. And when you blast I Will Survive from your windows, we’ll watch you and nod just like the people of Wuhan, who sung from their windows in February, nodded while watching us.#Many of you will fall asleep vowing that the very first thing you’ll do as soon as lockdown is over is file for divorce. Many children will be conceived. Your children will be schooled online. They’ll be horrible nuisances; they’ll give you joy. Elderly people will disobey you like rowdy teenagers: you’ll have to fight with them in order to forbid them from going out, to get infected and die. You will try not to think about the lonely deaths inside the ICU. You’ll want to cover with rose petals all medical workers’ steps. You will be told that society is united in a communal effort, that you are all in the same boat. It will be true. This experience will change for good how you perceive yourself as an individual part of a larger whole.#italyItaly
The Guardian UK
London, United Kingdom · 1 day ago
Planet of the apex: test your shark knowledge with our fin-tastic quiz
From shark heists to seafood scams, how much do you really know about these at-risk predators?What is the collective noun for sharks?A shiver of sharksA conspiracy of sharksA suit of sharksAn armoury of sharksWhich of these sharks is no fairytale?TrollElfGoblinLoch Ness Swell sharks can swallow water to make themselves appear bigger, and bark like a dog when lifted out of the water. They also give off an ethereal green glow: why?Toxic chemical spills have turned them greenThey eat a lot of bioluminescent planktonSo they can identify each other in the darkThey have faint genetic links to an alien species A celebrity great white shark known as Katherine, with 60,000 Twitter followers, works the waters off the North American coast. When she’s not breaking the internet (OK, the OCEARCH shark tracker site) with her location pings, she’s providing crucial learning about the mating habits of sexually mature great whites. How long is the gestation period for great white pups?18 months 3 months4 yearsNothing - they lay eggsWhich of these characters from JR Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings has a shark namesake?SauronFrodoGandalfGollumWhich of the following is untrue about the song Baby Shark (YouTube views as of publication: 5.9bn)?It is a tried-and-tested song for setting the pace of CPRPeople have reported that listening to the song backwards reveals satanic messagesIt was sung at a protest in Lebanon to soothe a toddler in his mum’s carNo one knows who created (and can be blamed for) the original baby sharkThe mako shark is the ocean's fastest, able to swim as fast as 35mph. What unusual attribute contributes to its speed?It uses its fins in a propeller motionIt blows water backwards from its mouthIt builds speed by leaping out of the waterIt is partially warm-bloodedFrilled sharks are one of the oldest species of shark in the world – mysterious ocean bottom-dwellers that resemble a cross between an eel and a shark. When do experts estimate this species appeared?65 million years ago – around the time a mass extinction wiped out the dinosaurs25 million years ago – when apes diverged from old world monkeys95 million years ago – in the last portion of 'the age of dinosaurs'200 million years ago – when the supercontinent Pangea began to break upWhich shark takes cylindrical chunks of flesh out of its prey – often much larger sharks and whales?Cookie-cutter sharkGulper sharkSponge-sucker sharkLemon sharkWhat did Donald Trump once tweet about sharks?Every time I speak of sharks I do so with great love and affection. They cannot help the fact that they were born fucked up!Obama's wind turbines kill millions of sharks in sharknados every year. The Paris climate agreement hurts Americans, sharks, and costs a fortuneSharks are last on my list – other than perhaps the losers and haters of the World!Sharks only bite do-nothing Democrats! Swim faster LOSERS!What method of repelling sharks is being trialled in Réunion Island in the Indian Ocean?Magnets disguised as kelp'Scaresharks'– giant inflatable sharksNets baited with chumPlaying jazz underwaterThe tasselled wobbegong is often found on coral reefs or near the shore in Australia, Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. What trick does it use to catch its food?Vigorously shakes its tassels to cause underwater waves to dislodge preyFilters fish and plankton through its open mouth as it movesSquirts a cloud of noxious gas to confuse its preyCamouflages itself as coral and wobbles its tail back and forth in a mesmerising dance to lure fishWhich of the following most accurately resembles how the skin of most sharks would feel under your hand?SilkLeatherSandpaperScalesMiss Helen, a female grey horn shark, was abducted from a US aquarium in 2018. How did they smuggle her out?Pretended she was a toy from the gift shopDressed her up as an employeeWheeled her out in a baby’s pramPretended to impound Miss Helen as evidence in a fake cocaine bustSharks are often caught as bycatch in the Mediterranean. According to the Italian coast guard and experts, what is shortfin mako or blue shark often fraudulently sold as?SwordfishCalamariChickenTunaWhat are the ampullae of Lorenzini?A species of shark found in the MediterraneanThe top sharks in a group that hunt togetherRoman shark godsThe system of electromagnetic receptors on a shark's snoutFish are friends (sometimes). There are many examples of sharks enjoying a gentler relationship with their surroundings than their reputation as mindless killers would suggest. Which of the following is untrue?Remora fish hitch rides on some shark speciesDolphins and sharks often work together to corner schools of fishSharks allow pilot fish to swim inside their mouths to pick food from their teethBonnethead sharks munch on seagrassWhat have scientists never seen a whale shark do?Give birthSurfaceChange directionFeedWhat great white shark mystery is concerning experts in Cape Town, South Africa?They found a skeleton of one on Table MountainThey've all disappearedThey’ve been propelling themselves on to beachesThey're eating the base of the harbour wallsIn May, customs officials made the biggest shark fin seizure in Hong Kong history: 26 tonnes, in two shipping containers from Ecuador. How many sharks were the fins taken from?50038,5002,00017,50020 and above.Congratulations – top sharking skills19 and above.Excellent shark skills. You are all about the apex18 and above.Excellent shark skills. You are all about the apex17 and above.Excellent shark skills. You are all about the apex16 and above.Excellent shark skills. You are all about the apex15 and above.Excellent shark skills. You are all about the apex14 and above.Excellent shark skills. You are all about the apex13 and above.Between a rock and a shark place. Just keep swimming – there’s more to learn12 and above.Between a rock and a shark place. Just keep swimming – there’s more to learn11 and above.Between a rock and a shark place. Just keep swimming – there’s more to learn10 and above.Between a rock and a shark place. Just keep swimming – there’s more to learn9 and above.Between a rock and a shark place. Just keep swimming – there’s more to learn8 and above.Between a rock and a shark place. Just keep swimming – there’s more to learn7 and above.Between a rock and a shark place. Just keep swimming – there’s more to learn6 and above.Your knowledge of sharks is as nonexistent as a sharknado5 and above.Your knowledge of sharks is as nonexistent as a sharknado4 and above.Your knowledge of sharks is as nonexistent as a sharknado3 and above.Your knowledge of sharks is as nonexistent as a sharknado2 and above.Your knowledge of sharks is as nonexistent as a sharknado0 and above.Your knowledge of sharks is as nonexistent as a sharknado1 and above.Your knowledge of sharks is as nonexistent as a sharknado Continue reading...#sharks#marine_life#environment#conservation #animals#wildlife#oceans
The Week UK
London, United Kingdom · 2 days ago
Instant Opinion: the year is 2022 - so ‘what does life look like’?
Credits Tomohiro Ohsumi/Getty Images Your guide to the best columns and commentary on Friday 10 July Reaction The Week Staff Friday, July 10, 2020 - 12:08pm The Week’s daily round-up highlights the five best opinion pieces from across the British and international media, with excerpts from each. 1. David Leonhardt in The New York Times on the post-coronavirus future It’s 2022. What Does Life Look Like? “It’s 2022, and the coronavirus has at long last been defeated. After a miserable year-and-a-half, alternating between lockdowns and new outbreaks, life can finally begin returning to normal. But it will not be the old normal. It will be a new world, with a reshaped economy, much as war and depression reordered life for previous generations. Thousands of stores and companies that were vulnerable before the virus arrived have disappeared. Dozens of colleges are shutting down, in the first wave of closures in the history of American higher education. People have also changed long-held patterns of behavior: Outdoor socializing is in, business trips are out. And American politics — while still divided in many of the same ways it was before the virus — has entered a new era. All of this, obviously, is conjecture. The future is unknowable. But the pandemic increasingly looks like one of the defining events of our time.” 2. Billy Bragg, musician and activist, in The Guardian on how speech is only free when everyone has a voice ‘Cancel culture’ doesn’t stifle debate, but it does challenge the old order See related Cartoon characters could be banned from junk food London Underground to consider ban on junk food adverts Children's online junk food ads banned by watchdog “The ability of middle-aged gatekeepers to control the agenda has been usurped by a new generation of activists who can spread information through their own networks, allowing them to challenge narratives promoted by the status quo. The great progressive movements of the 21st century have sprung from these networks: Black Lives Matter; #MeToo; Extinction Rebellion. While they may seem disparate in their aims, what they have in common is a demand for accountability. Although free speech remains the fundamental bedrock of a free society, for everyone to enjoy the benefits of freedom, liberty needs to be tempered by two further dimensions: equality and accountability. Without equality, those in power will use their freedom of expression to abuse and marginalise others. Without accountability, liberty can mutate into the most dangerous of all freedoms – impunity.” 3. Iain Martin in The Times on Rishi’s rapid rise Sunak’s road to No 10 gets bumpy from here “It is already possible to see how at some future critical moment in this pandemic, or when there is an electoral reverse or constitutional crisis, Mr Johnson could become the latest victim of Conservative Party ruthlessness. There are pitfalls for the chancellor, though. Mr Johnson is dangerously competitive. Soon, it will also be possible for opponents to label the chancellor Mr Unemployment. Often the Tory frontrunner doesn’t win and for all the spin that everything is lovely between Nos 10 and 11 right now, it won’t always be. A small but vicious band of Johnson ultra-loyalists will defend their man and their power. All that fun is to come. But it is worth pausing for a moment to admire the manner in which someone who just a year ago was serving as parliamentary under-secretary of state for local government rose to become the likely next prime minister.” 4. John T Bennett in The Independent on a president losing grip at the worst possible time I’ve documented Trump every day of his presidency — and now he’s in free-fall “The more Trump follows his instincts, the further he seems to fall. He has stumbled before during his term. But after watching every day of his presidency since he was sworn in on that grey day in January 2017, this correspondent sees a president in free-fall. He has no message for voters on why they should hand him a second term. His potential legal problems mounted Thursday when the Supreme Court ruled his office does not grant him automatic immunity from a Manhattan district attorney’s subpoena seeking his tax and financial records. His poll numbers are dismal. The virus is spreading again like wildfire. On issues from wearing masks to guard against Covid-carrying droplets ejected from our fellow humans to flying the Confederate flag to whether coronavirus is even that serious to the real state of the virus-hobbled economy, Trump’s know-it-all approach to life leaves him more and more isolated.” 5. Fraser Nelson in The Daily Telegraph on an obscured truth about Britain’s care chaos The real story behind Britain’s Covid care home crisis isn’t what you think “Care homes argue, still, that their business model depends on being able to pay people less than supermarkets do. Their complaint about Brexit, even now, is that it makes it harder for them to import cheap labour and keep wages down. Their bigger concern should be what the Covid crisis has shown about their ability to protect those in their care. Deciding what to do about care homes is, we’re told, high up on Boris Johnson’s list – but the more important point is what lessons can be learned now. If there is to be a second wave of Covid, it’s pretty clear what ought to happen: care home workers should be isolated and put up in a hotel if needs be. And – needless to say – forbidden from working from multiple homes. It will cost, but looking after the elderly can’t be done on the cheap. The last few months have proved, yet again, the real price of low-cost care.” UK News US Media Science & Health Politics Society Coronavirus Covid-19 Free speech Rishi Sunak Boris Johnson 10 Downing Street Donald Trump 2020 US election care homes#world_news
Keso Bigvava
Tbilisi, Georgia · 1 month ago
JK Rowling Finally Sets The Record Straight About The Inspiration Behind Key Harry Potter Locations
Ever since JK Rowling first published her account of the “boy who lived”, theories about the inspirations for Harry Potter – and the magical world he inhabits – have abounded. Cafés and landmarks everywhere from Scotland to Portugal display signs claiming to have played host to the author while she wrote the novels – or, more boldly, to be the basis for the likes of Hogwarts, Diagon Alley, and Hogsmeade. Fortunately, one muggle plucked up the courage to ask Rowling about it on Twitter, and she obliged with a lengthy response. “If you define the birthplace of Harry Potter as the moment when I had the initial idea, then it was a Manchester-London train,” she wrote. “But I’m perennially amused by the idea that Hogwarts was directly inspired by beautiful places I saw or visited, because it’s so far from the truth.” She then contradicted assertions that she had used a 14th-century street known as the Shambles in York as a model for Diagon Alley, and that any of Edinburgh’s landmarks really shaped her conception of Hogwarts. “A truthful tour of HP ‘inspirations’ would involve a stationery guide pointing a stick at a picture of my head, which would be zero fun and nobody would buy tickets,” she quipped. “If I’d genuinely been inspired by every old building, creepy alleyway, pub, graveyard and underpass that’s claimed, I’d have spent my late twenties on a non-stop road trip between locations, and I promise I didn’t. I was mostly sitting in places I could get a cheap coffee/could afford the rent and making it all up.” As for where she wrote the first lines of The Philosopher’s Stone? “The first bricks of Hogwarts were laid in a flat in Clapham Junction,” she revealed, along with a photograph of the building where she was “renting a room” over “what was then a sports shop”. Slightly more romantically, she penned the chapter in which Harry gets his first wand from Ollivanders under a tree – even posting a photograph of it, although she neglected to reveal its exact location. “I can’t absolutely guarantee they haven’t taken away the old tree & planted a new one in the same corner of the field. I haven’t been there for nearly 30 years. But I think it’s this one.” #harrypotter #jkrowling #hpfuns #harrypottermovies Tbilisi
The Week UK
London, United Kingdom · 16 hours ago
Instant Opinion: Keir Starmer must offer more than ‘not being Jeremy Corbyn’
Your guide to the best columns and commentary on Monday 13 July Reaction The Week Staff Monday, July 13, 2020 - 2:20pm The Week’s daily round-up highlights the five best opinion pieces from across the British and international media, with excerpts from each. 1. Tom Harris in The Daily Telegraph on the first 100 days of the Labour leader After 100 days, Keir Starmer needs to offer voters more than ‘not being Jeremy Corbyn’ “The improvements he has made to his party’s – and his own – standing are real and important. That he has made mistakes along the way should hardly surprise anyone, although he needs to make fewer of them if he is to establish himself as a natural repository of anti-government support. Electorates have a nasty habit of making judgments about politicians in the very first few weeks of their tenure, and then refusing to reverse that judgment. The Covid lockdown may have given Starmer a longer period to bed in and might even allow him to have an effective relaunch on the other side of this crisis. From the perspective of a former member, Starmer represents a breath of fresh air for most Labour supporters after five fraught years. But a sense of relief won’t be enough for all those red wall voters, because – and I speak from experience – once you get out of the habit of voting Labour, it’s harder than you might expect to get back into it.” 2. Nesrine Malik in The Guardian in defence of those decried as ‘online mobs’ The ‘cancel culture’ war is really about old elites losing power in the social media age See related What is cancel culture? “Whenever I talk to people who are suddenly concerned about ‘cancel culture’ or ‘online mobs’, my first thought is always: ‘Where have you been for the last decade?’ I’ve been online long enough and, like many others, been receiving criticism and abuse online for long enough, to know that what some see as a new pattern of virtual censure by moral purists is mostly a story about the internet, not ideology or identity. If critics of ‘cancel culture’ are worried about opinions, posts and writings being constantly patrolled by a growing group of haters, then I am afraid they are extremely late to the party. I cannot remember a time where I have written or posted anything without thinking: ‘How many ways can this possibly be misconstrued, and can I defend it if it were?’ It’s not even a conscious thought process now, it’s instinct.” 3. Sean O’Grady in The Independent on the recovery of the British economy Forget global Britain - thanks to Brexit, coronavirus and a trade war with China, we’re losing our grip “There’s something heroic about Britain trying to chuck its weight around this way, and of course no one wants to do business with bullies and tyrants. But still, if the British economy is going to recover from the coronavirus-induced recession and go on to grow in the 2020s it will need its friends and its markets, and the British now seem to intent on blanking virtually everyone. The opportunities seem to be contracting rather than expanding. As everyone agrees, the UK is a great trading nation, and since before the industrial revolution has made its living from selling abroad, but the we don’t seem to be living up to the original hopes of ‘unleashing Britain’s potential’.” 4. John Prideaux, US editor of The Economist, in The Times on an abolitionist deserving of a pedestal A slavery statue we can all agree on: Frederick Douglass “On both sides of the Atlantic a great debate about statues is under way. So far the focus has mostly been on which lumps of bronze and marble should be removed by crane, or pushed into the harbour. There has been less discussion of what to do with all the empty plinths this creates. Yet putting up statues is fun. It is an opportunity to honour someone who should be universally admired and, therefore, to make a statement about what the society doing the putting up values. For those reasons Britain ought to have a statue of America’s greatest campaigner for the abolition of slavery, Frederick Douglass. Douglass had such an extraordinary life that the three autobiographies he wrote hardly seem sufficient.” 5. Nick Akerman, an assistant special prosecutor on the Watergate Special Prosecution Force, in The New York Times on the unfair fight set up for the special prosecutor Did Mueller Ever Stand a Chance Against Trump and Roger Stone? “From the start, Mr. Mueller was restrained by Justice Department regulations. He was barred, for example, from looking into the broader relationship between Mr. Trump and Russia through a review of Mr. Trump’s financial records and tax returns. Furthermore, according to the Mueller report, Mr. Trump made multiple attempts to fire the special counsel, and it is difficult, if not almost impossible, to conduct an investigation under those circumstances... Looking ahead, there needs to be a better mechanism in extraordinary circumstances - like Watergate and Russian interference in the 2016 election - that allows for the appointment of a truly independent special prosecutor. We were lucky to get the Mueller report, but Mr. Mueller was acting under restraints. Unfortunately history tells us that we will need special counsels in the years ahead, under extraordinary circumstances, and like we did with Watergate, that office should have true independence to protect our country and Constitution.” UK News US Russia Crime Science & Health Politics Society Law Keir Starmer Jeremy Corbyn Social media Boris Johnson Brexit slavery Donald Trump Russia US election 2016#world_news
The Guardian UK
London, United Kingdom · 16 hours ago
Check, Change, Go: what the UK government's latest slogan means for your holiday
Holidaymakers will soon face higher travel insurance charges and mobile phone costs, and tougher passport controls. Thank goodness for this three-word advice …Name: Holidays.Age: More than a thousand years.Wow! Did the Anglo-Saxons really take trips to Benidorm? Try to treat this seriously. Holiday is derived from the Old English word hāligdæg, meaning holy day. It was a day set aside for religious observance. The trips to Southend and beyond came later.And when did we stop taking them? That’s easier. In 2020, we abandoned holidays in the travel sense and went back to praying. Vacations out; vocations in.But seriously, do you think holidays are over? Well, the newspapers have pictures of the odd bikini-clad Brit sitting in splendid isolation beside a pool in Spain, but in reality people will be taking fewer foreign holidays this summer.Why? The information on which countries you can and can’t travel to without quarantining seems to change every day. Air travel is now even more unpleasant than before. And if you do manage to get to your four-star hotel in Ibiza, you’ll probably have to book for the pool and there will be no breakfast buffet.Oh well, it’ll have to be a staycation for me. That will please Boris Johnson, who says you will be doing your bit for the economy. But expect to have your temperature checked on arrival; there will be queues for the lift because numbers will be restricted; and you will be encouraged to eat in your room.Any other options? Adventurer and chief scout Bear Grylls is fronting a campaign to encourage children to camp out in their garden or a nearby park. It would at least be cheap. And I suppose you could have the breakfast buffet.OK, how much is a pop-up tent? I guess I’ll just have to wait until 2021 to go further afield. Indeed, but start planning now if you want to go anywhere in the EU. The government’s new Check, Change, Go ad campaign – how it loves those three-word slogans – is stressing the problems that will face holidaymakers after the end of the Brexit transition period in December. Such as? Higher travel insurance charges; higher mobile phone costs; tougher passport controls; long bureaucratic delays to get a pet passport.Project Fear? Project Reality!What does Check, Change, Go actually mean? It is being widely interpreted on social media. “Check what Boris Johnson said during the referendum campaign; change your plans to visit the EU; go back to the 1970s,” sums up the general mood.But I thought we were taking back control with an oven-ready deal that was going to save the NHS £350m a week and get us better terms than we ever had as members of the EU. You poor gullible fool. You need a holiday.Do say: “I hear New Malden is nice at this time of year.”Don’t say: “It’s two weeks in the Algarve for us this August as usual.” Continue reading...#european_union_holidays#travel#brexit #european_union
The Guardian UK
London, United Kingdom · 1 day ago
Lianne La Havas: 'It's hard to fit in when you have two heritages'
The London soul sensation, about to release her first album in five years, talks about identity, her friendship with Prince and her political awakeningLianne La Havas arrives on her bike, a sturdy looking affair with a wicker front basket. It’s a June morning in Brockwell Park, south London, and the sun is out and the flowers are bright and the world is delicious. There are six of us here, all women; this is the first time, post-corona crisis, that any of us have been involved in an interview and photo shoot where everyone is outside their own house. A new beginning… And also an end, for in just a few days, the beaches will be packed, the park as full as a festival, parties will get rowdy and be broken up by police, and lockdown will be done. For now, though, we’re in a dreamy, singular moment.Up the hill to do the photos in a walled garden. La Havas parks her bike and sits on a bench to apply her makeup. She spends some time on her eyebrows, holds earrings up to see if they suit. A designer friend sent her some clothes to wear, but they were all a bit too hot and stiff, so she’s in a cotton dress that ties at the waist and airs her midriff. She’s calm but friendly. Centred. If you told me she was a yoga teacher, I wouldn’t be surprised. Continue reading...#lianne_la_havas#soul#pop_and_rock #black_lives_matter_movement#society#music#culture
The Guardian UK
London, United Kingdom · 1 day ago
‘They just got away with paying men more …’ Milestone looms in Asda equal pay fight
On the eve of a supreme court hearing for the UK’s biggest joint claim, former women shopworkers describe their six-year questFor years, Wendy Arundale was nicknamed Little Miss Asda. At one point her whole family, including her husband and two children, worked at the supermarket. She dyed her hair pink for an Asda breast cancer fundraiser. She ran a hotdog stand for Asda. The 62-year-old grandmother of nine from Middlesbrough spent 32 years of her life working at Asda. It’s fair to say she was a dedicated employee.“It makes me feel sad, and I do get bitter now sometimes thinking of how I was treated,” she said, speaking to the Observer. “My husband was paid 80p more than me an hour. I was close to crying at times because I wasn’t valued. The girls were paid terrible compared to the men. It makes you feel stupid. I really loved my job, but I don’t know why I put up with feeling like this for so long.” Continue reading...#asda #supermarkets#uk_news#equal_pay#women
The Week UK
London, United Kingdom · 14 hours ago
Are millennials really an ‘infantilised generation’ - and if so, why?
Description New book argues that lack of moral boundaries has created ‘disoriented’ generation and fuelled identity politics Credits Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty Images Alt Text A woman at Disneyland Shanghai New book argues that lack of moral boundaries has created ‘disoriented’ generation and fuelled identity politics In Depth Arion McNicoll Monday, July 13, 2020 - 4:12pm A whole generation have been “infantilised” and left without “self-sufficiency and intellectual independence” as a result of their parents’ failure to enforce boundaries, according to a new book by a leading sociology professor. Frank Furedi argues that millennials - people born between 1981 and 1996 - have been “disorientated” by this lack of discipline and that as a result, the transition to adulthood “takes much, much longer than ever before”. So are millennials living an extended childhood? Over the course of three or four generations, boundaries for children have been gradually taken down, claims Furedi, the emeritus professor of sociology at Kent University, in his book Why Borders Matter. “Children develop by reacting against those lines, the boundaries that are set, and that is a very creative process to gain self-sufficiency and intellectual independence,” he writes. Yet young people today “are kicking against open doors”, according to the academic. “The whole developmental process becomes compromised and you do end up with a situation where the transition from childhood to adolescence takes much, much longer than ever before and the transition from adolescence to adulthood also takes much longer.” See related What is cancel culture? Furedi’s claims about delayed adulthood appear to be backed up by data published by the Office for National Statistics last year that shows many key milestones are occurring later in life. British people are starting full-time work, moving out of their parents’ homes, marrying, and having children later than any previous generation since records begans. So are parents entirely to blame? A failure to reach an age-appropriate level of maturity can be the result of “unmanageable stress or trauma”, but can also occur “society-wide”, says Simon Gottschalk, a professor of sociology at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Famous socialogists including Herbert Marcuse and Erich Fromm have suggested that “like individuals – a society can also suffer from arrested development”, Gottschalk writes in an article on The Conversation. Today, infantilisation is present not only in people’s approach to parenting, but also in an education system where students are constantly monitored and spoon-fed information, and even in workplaces where managers electronically keep tabs on their employees, Gottschalk argues. He also points to “infantilist trends in language” and in “popular culture – in the shorter sentences in contemporary novels, in the lack of sophistication in political rhetoric and in sensationalist cable news coverage”. When did it begin? The idea that young people are failing to mature quickly enough is nothing new, says Vice writer Leah Mandel. “In fact, it’s been going on since at least as far back as the 1960s, when former Vogue editor-in-chief Diana Vreeland coined the term ‘youthquake’ to describe the ‘childlike’ mod dresses and mini-skirts of the Beatlemania era,” Mandel writes. In time, the idea became a self-fulfilling prophecy, with “fashion and beauty media latch[ing] onto the idea that what is young, or what the young like, is inevitably going to sell”. “Brands started marketing their inventory as a way of preserving one’s youth and cool. The youthquake never ended,” Mandel says. And the impact? The results, according to Furedi, are manifold. As well as creating a culture where parents aim to be friends with their children rather than authority figures, he argues, the infantilisation of millennials has also fuelled identity politics. In an inherent paradox, the dismantling of moral boundaries has resulted in a generation that abhors those who make moral judgments, leaving millennials to create borders of their own - which in turn, creates a judgmental breed of identity politics, Furedi claims. “The thing about identity politics is that every expression they use is actually a contradiction,” he writes. “They talk about diversity - that’s one of the key values of identity politics - but identity politics is totally hostile to a diversity of viewpoints. So if you argue a different narrative to what they are arguing, that is seen as racist, as offensive, as hate.” World News Science & Health millennials Identity politics #society
Giorgi Gvajaia
Tbilisi, Georgia · 1 year ago
Sorry tourists, Amsterdam doesn't want you anymore❌👇🏻 (CNN) — Famous for its tolerance as much as its narrow houses and broad canals, Amsterdam is undergoing a radical change of attitude when it comes to the millions of tourists that flock to see it each year. Tolerance, it seems, has reached its limits in the Dutch capital, which is now actively urging visitors to head elsewhere as frustrated locals complain of feeling besieged by visitors using the city's bicycle-thronged streets as a travel playground. "The pressure is very high," says Ellen van Loon, a partner at Dutch architectural firm OMA who is involved in adapting the city for the future. "We don't want to turn into a Venice. The problem we are currently facing is that Amsterdam is so loved by tourists, we just have so many coming to the city." While Van Loon acknowledges the positive aspects of tourism, which earns the Dutch economy around 82 billion euros ($91.5 billion) a year, like many locals she's worried that soaring visitor numbers are destroying the soul of this vibrant cosmopolitan city. Like Venice and other destinations across Europe, Amsterdam has become a byword for overtourism -- a phenomenon closely linked to the rise in cheaper air travel that has seen visitors flood certain places, often spoiling the very spot they came to enjoy. While some cities are still formulating ways to cope, Amsterdam -- where a decade-long surge in visitor numbers is forecast to continue, rising from 18 million in 2018 to 42 million in 2030, or more than 50 times the current population -- has simply decided it's had enough. CNN Travel's Richard Quest meets Reinier Sijpkens on board his musical boat. Netherlands tourist officials recently took the bold decision to stop advertising the country as a tourist destination. Their "Perspective 2030″ report, published earlier this year, stated that the focus will now be on "destination management" rather than "destination promotion." The document also outlines the country's future strategy, acknowledging that Amsterdam's livability will be severely impacted by "visitor overload" if action isn't taken. Solutions listed include working to dissuade groups of "nuisance" visitors by either limiting or completely shutting down "accommodation and entertainment products" aimed at them, as well as spreading visitors to other parts of the Netherlands. Some of these measures have already come into play. Last year, the famous "I amsterdam" sign was removed from outside the Rijksmuseum, the city's main art gallery, at the request of the city of Amsterdam, as it was "drawing too big of a crowd to an already limited space. Measures have also been taken to discourage travelers from visiting some of Amsterdam's seedier tourist hotspots. Earlier this year, the city government announced it will end tours of the Red Light District in central Amsterdam, citing concerns that sex workers are being treated as a tourist attraction. One of Amsterdam's most famous residents, Anne died in a concentration camp in 1945 at the age of 15. "We pride ourselves on being a city which is tolerant. A city where people can be themselves, which is true," says museum director Ronald Leopold, one of the guardians of Anne's diary and legacy. "But we also have these dark pages, and these are probably the darkest." According to Leopald, around half of the 1.3 million people who visit the Anne Frank House each year are under the age of 30. "I think it's increasingly important to learn about what happened here during World War II and the Holocaust," he adds. Like many other locals, architect Van Loon fears that Amsterdam, which came in 23rd place on Euromonitor International's report on the Top 100 City Destinations in 2018, is dangerously close to losing its unique allure forever. "The reason tourists come here is because there's something in the character of Amsterdam they love," she explains. "But at a certain point, when the amount of tourists is increasing and increasing, they actually kill what they loved in the first place."