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Disney means magic
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Kato Malania
Tbilisi · 4 months ago

One of my favorite videos, parts from Disney animation movies teaching us the most important life lessons💫

#disney #life
Kato Malania
Tbilisi · 4 months ago
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Artists Voyage
Tbilisi, Georgia · 2 months ago
10 inspiring quotes from "The Little Prince" by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
Here's our compilation of the best quotes from "Le Petit Prince" by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, complete with valuable life lessons for all. "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye.” “It is much more difficult to judge oneself than to judge others. If you succeed in judging yourself rightly, then you are indeed a man of true wisdom." "What matters most are the simple pleasures so abundant that we can all enjoy them...Happiness doesn't lie in the objects we gather around us. To find it, all we need to do is open our eyes.” “All men have stars, but they are not the same things for different people. For some, who are travelers, the stars are guides. For others they are no more than little lights in the sky. For others, who are scholars, they are problems... But all these stars are silent. You-You alone will have stars as no one else has them." “Well, I must endure the presence of a few caterpillars if I wish to become acquainted with the butterflies.” “It's the time you spent on your rose that makes your rose so important...People have forgotten this truth, but you mustn't forget it. You become responsible forever for what you've tamed. You're responsible for your rose.” “But the conceited man did not hear him. Conceited people never hear anything but praise.” “A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.” “All grown-ups were once children... but only few of them remember it.” “The most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen or touched, they are felt with the heart.”#littleprince #quotes #AntoinedeSaintExupéry #art Tbilisi
Artists Voyage
Tbilisi, Georgia · 1 month ago
“It is the time you have wasted for your rose that makes your rose so important.”
On that story, the little prince, fell in love instantly with a rose in his asteroid. The little prince care so much to the rose. The rose with its thorns seems defenseless and susceptible- and yet, she shows off her thorns and puts on a superior attitude. But the rose’s vanity and demands cause the heartbreak of the little prince. And thus, he decided to leave its asteroid and the rose. “She cast her fragrance and her radiance over me. I ought never to have run away from her… I ought to have guessed all the affection that lay behind her poor little stratagems. Flowers are so inconsistent! But I was too young to know how to love her…” Just before the prince leaves, the rose said to it’s prince : “Of course I love you,” the flower said to him. “It is my fault that you have not known it all the while. That is of no importance. But you — you have been just as foolish as I. Try to be happy…” On his voyage to the earth, he come across a huge rose garden, and he realised that his roses were not the only one in the universe. “There might be millions of roses in the whole world, but you’re my only one, unique rose.” On the movie adaptation, the rose is the reason why the prince come back to its asteroid even though it’s too late that the rose has dead. “. . . One sees clearly only with the heart. Anything essential is invisible to the eyes. . . . It’s the time that you spent on your rose that makes your rose so important. . . . You become responsible for what you’ve tamed. You’re responsible for your rose. . . .” The story was telling a beautiful story of love. As the rose, we may take the love that’s being given as granted, and thus, we forgot to ’taking care’ of the love itself. And as a little prince, we may need to go around the world to realise that our rose is the only one because ‘anything essential is invisible to the eyes…’ Even though the rose is being portrayed in the story as a vain, foolish, frail, and naïve creature, the little prince loves that rose. Nothing ever goes away until it teaches us what we need to know.#littleprince #rose #fox #art #love Tbilisi
The Week UK
London, United Kingdom · 2 days ago
Instant Opinion: the year is 2022 - so ‘what does life look like’?
Credits Tomohiro Ohsumi/Getty Images Your guide to the best columns and commentary on Friday 10 July Reaction The Week Staff Friday, July 10, 2020 - 12:08pm The Week’s daily round-up highlights the five best opinion pieces from across the British and international media, with excerpts from each. 1. David Leonhardt in The New York Times on the post-coronavirus future It’s 2022. What Does Life Look Like? “It’s 2022, and the coronavirus has at long last been defeated. After a miserable year-and-a-half, alternating between lockdowns and new outbreaks, life can finally begin returning to normal. But it will not be the old normal. It will be a new world, with a reshaped economy, much as war and depression reordered life for previous generations. Thousands of stores and companies that were vulnerable before the virus arrived have disappeared. Dozens of colleges are shutting down, in the first wave of closures in the history of American higher education. People have also changed long-held patterns of behavior: Outdoor socializing is in, business trips are out. And American politics — while still divided in many of the same ways it was before the virus — has entered a new era. All of this, obviously, is conjecture. The future is unknowable. But the pandemic increasingly looks like one of the defining events of our time.” 2. Billy Bragg, musician and activist, in The Guardian on how speech is only free when everyone has a voice ‘Cancel culture’ doesn’t stifle debate, but it does challenge the old order See related Cartoon characters could be banned from junk food London Underground to consider ban on junk food adverts Children's online junk food ads banned by watchdog “The ability of middle-aged gatekeepers to control the agenda has been usurped by a new generation of activists who can spread information through their own networks, allowing them to challenge narratives promoted by the status quo. The great progressive movements of the 21st century have sprung from these networks: Black Lives Matter; #MeToo; Extinction Rebellion. While they may seem disparate in their aims, what they have in common is a demand for accountability. Although free speech remains the fundamental bedrock of a free society, for everyone to enjoy the benefits of freedom, liberty needs to be tempered by two further dimensions: equality and accountability. Without equality, those in power will use their freedom of expression to abuse and marginalise others. Without accountability, liberty can mutate into the most dangerous of all freedoms – impunity.” 3. Iain Martin in The Times on Rishi’s rapid rise Sunak’s road to No 10 gets bumpy from here “It is already possible to see how at some future critical moment in this pandemic, or when there is an electoral reverse or constitutional crisis, Mr Johnson could become the latest victim of Conservative Party ruthlessness. There are pitfalls for the chancellor, though. Mr Johnson is dangerously competitive. Soon, it will also be possible for opponents to label the chancellor Mr Unemployment. Often the Tory frontrunner doesn’t win and for all the spin that everything is lovely between Nos 10 and 11 right now, it won’t always be. A small but vicious band of Johnson ultra-loyalists will defend their man and their power. All that fun is to come. But it is worth pausing for a moment to admire the manner in which someone who just a year ago was serving as parliamentary under-secretary of state for local government rose to become the likely next prime minister.” 4. John T Bennett in The Independent on a president losing grip at the worst possible time I’ve documented Trump every day of his presidency — and now he’s in free-fall “The more Trump follows his instincts, the further he seems to fall. He has stumbled before during his term. But after watching every day of his presidency since he was sworn in on that grey day in January 2017, this correspondent sees a president in free-fall. He has no message for voters on why they should hand him a second term. His potential legal problems mounted Thursday when the Supreme Court ruled his office does not grant him automatic immunity from a Manhattan district attorney’s subpoena seeking his tax and financial records. His poll numbers are dismal. The virus is spreading again like wildfire. On issues from wearing masks to guard against Covid-carrying droplets ejected from our fellow humans to flying the Confederate flag to whether coronavirus is even that serious to the real state of the virus-hobbled economy, Trump’s know-it-all approach to life leaves him more and more isolated.” 5. Fraser Nelson in The Daily Telegraph on an obscured truth about Britain’s care chaos The real story behind Britain’s Covid care home crisis isn’t what you think “Care homes argue, still, that their business model depends on being able to pay people less than supermarkets do. Their complaint about Brexit, even now, is that it makes it harder for them to import cheap labour and keep wages down. Their bigger concern should be what the Covid crisis has shown about their ability to protect those in their care. Deciding what to do about care homes is, we’re told, high up on Boris Johnson’s list – but the more important point is what lessons can be learned now. If there is to be a second wave of Covid, it’s pretty clear what ought to happen: care home workers should be isolated and put up in a hotel if needs be. And – needless to say – forbidden from working from multiple homes. It will cost, but looking after the elderly can’t be done on the cheap. The last few months have proved, yet again, the real price of low-cost care.” UK News US Media Science & Health Politics Society Coronavirus Covid-19 Free speech Rishi Sunak Boris Johnson 10 Downing Street Donald Trump 2020 US election care homes#world_news
Kato Malania
Tbilisi, Georgia · 3 months ago
Disney quotes
𝐼 𝑗𝑢𝑠𝑡 𝑤𝑎𝑛𝑡 𝑎 𝑓𝑎𝑖𝑟𝑦𝑡𝑎𝑙𝑒💫 #opinion #art #photo #design #disney #disneyquotes #disneyworld #animation #love #motivation #fairytale #princess
+4
Giorgi Gvajaia
Tbilisi, Georgia · 1 year ago
ძალიან საყურადღებო თემა❗️❗️❗️ მე, პირადად, შემეძლო ნახევარი თბილისის მობილურების პაროლები მცოდნოდა იმდენის აკრეფის პროცესი მინახავს ჩემდა უნებურად...ასევე მინახავს სხვის ჩათში გულებისა💘 და კოცნების💋გაგზავნის პროცესი...გამღიმებია 🙃 მეტი ყურადღებაა საჭირო, მაგალითად: 📌კინოში ყოფნისას, როცა უკანა რიგიდან გაკვირდებიან.... 📌ტრანსპორტში, როცა თავზე გადგათ თქვენთვის უცნობი მგზავრი.... 📌პიკის საათის დროს, როცა ლამის კეფასთან სუნთქავს უცხო ადამიანი... 📌 თუნდაც დახურულ საჯარო სივრცეში - შიდა სათვალთვალო კამერების ხედვის არეალში და ა.შ. ზოგადად, ციფრული ტექნოლოგიების ერაში, განსაკუთრებულად უნდა გავუფრთხილდეთ ჩვენს პერსონალურ მონაცემებს❗️❗️❗️ - - - This photographer captured shots of people texting their most intimate secrets in public — and it's a compelling insight into human nature👇🏻 If you've ever commuted on New York's subways in rush hour traffic, you may have found your eyes drifting to the open cellphone of the person seated beside you. This total stranger and fellow commuter might be texting a friend about dinner plans. They might be reading a book on their phone. They might be watching a movie, or browsing the web, or scrolling through Spotify. But other times, you'll find that the person seated beside you— their cellphone held out openly in their hand for all to see — is engaged in an activity that's a tad more intimate than dinner plans. Sometimes, you'll find that the person is sexting, or sending deeply personal text messages, or browsing Tinder, or sending dick picks. As a New York commuter, I've seen all of the above. Often, I've found it difficult to look away. New York-based photographer Jeff Mermelstein also has trouble looking away. Mermelstein has dedicated a large part of his street photography to capturing these intimate, fleeting messages. The images reveal deeply personal messages taken when the subject is unaware. Closely cropped, the photos reveal few identifying details other than a lacquered fingernail or a hand tattoo. "She likes ruff [sic] sex," one person types out. "Trust me we look like our pics for sure," writes another. "Tell your lady my wife has the same desire she has." Other messages are more emotionally wrought. "This past weekend I did Ayahuasca and you came up," a person writes. "It's taken me all week to figure out how I deeply regret not taking ownership for my actions and in hindsight I treated you with extreme disregard." "Start your chemotherapy from tomorrow, please," another message reads. "I know this is very unfair of life. I wish I could do something to take away your pain abd [sic] sickness...if I could I would do anything to save you."
The Week UK
London, United Kingdom · 17 hours ago
Instant Opinion: Keir Starmer must offer more than ‘not being Jeremy Corbyn’
Your guide to the best columns and commentary on Monday 13 July Reaction The Week Staff Monday, July 13, 2020 - 2:20pm The Week’s daily round-up highlights the five best opinion pieces from across the British and international media, with excerpts from each. 1. Tom Harris in The Daily Telegraph on the first 100 days of the Labour leader After 100 days, Keir Starmer needs to offer voters more than ‘not being Jeremy Corbyn’ “The improvements he has made to his party’s – and his own – standing are real and important. That he has made mistakes along the way should hardly surprise anyone, although he needs to make fewer of them if he is to establish himself as a natural repository of anti-government support. Electorates have a nasty habit of making judgments about politicians in the very first few weeks of their tenure, and then refusing to reverse that judgment. The Covid lockdown may have given Starmer a longer period to bed in and might even allow him to have an effective relaunch on the other side of this crisis. From the perspective of a former member, Starmer represents a breath of fresh air for most Labour supporters after five fraught years. But a sense of relief won’t be enough for all those red wall voters, because – and I speak from experience – once you get out of the habit of voting Labour, it’s harder than you might expect to get back into it.” 2. Nesrine Malik in The Guardian in defence of those decried as ‘online mobs’ The ‘cancel culture’ war is really about old elites losing power in the social media age See related What is cancel culture? “Whenever I talk to people who are suddenly concerned about ‘cancel culture’ or ‘online mobs’, my first thought is always: ‘Where have you been for the last decade?’ I’ve been online long enough and, like many others, been receiving criticism and abuse online for long enough, to know that what some see as a new pattern of virtual censure by moral purists is mostly a story about the internet, not ideology or identity. If critics of ‘cancel culture’ are worried about opinions, posts and writings being constantly patrolled by a growing group of haters, then I am afraid they are extremely late to the party. I cannot remember a time where I have written or posted anything without thinking: ‘How many ways can this possibly be misconstrued, and can I defend it if it were?’ It’s not even a conscious thought process now, it’s instinct.” 3. Sean O’Grady in The Independent on the recovery of the British economy Forget global Britain - thanks to Brexit, coronavirus and a trade war with China, we’re losing our grip “There’s something heroic about Britain trying to chuck its weight around this way, and of course no one wants to do business with bullies and tyrants. But still, if the British economy is going to recover from the coronavirus-induced recession and go on to grow in the 2020s it will need its friends and its markets, and the British now seem to intent on blanking virtually everyone. The opportunities seem to be contracting rather than expanding. As everyone agrees, the UK is a great trading nation, and since before the industrial revolution has made its living from selling abroad, but the we don’t seem to be living up to the original hopes of ‘unleashing Britain’s potential’.” 4. John Prideaux, US editor of The Economist, in The Times on an abolitionist deserving of a pedestal A slavery statue we can all agree on: Frederick Douglass “On both sides of the Atlantic a great debate about statues is under way. So far the focus has mostly been on which lumps of bronze and marble should be removed by crane, or pushed into the harbour. There has been less discussion of what to do with all the empty plinths this creates. Yet putting up statues is fun. It is an opportunity to honour someone who should be universally admired and, therefore, to make a statement about what the society doing the putting up values. For those reasons Britain ought to have a statue of America’s greatest campaigner for the abolition of slavery, Frederick Douglass. Douglass had such an extraordinary life that the three autobiographies he wrote hardly seem sufficient.” 5. Nick Akerman, an assistant special prosecutor on the Watergate Special Prosecution Force, in The New York Times on the unfair fight set up for the special prosecutor Did Mueller Ever Stand a Chance Against Trump and Roger Stone? “From the start, Mr. Mueller was restrained by Justice Department regulations. He was barred, for example, from looking into the broader relationship between Mr. Trump and Russia through a review of Mr. Trump’s financial records and tax returns. Furthermore, according to the Mueller report, Mr. Trump made multiple attempts to fire the special counsel, and it is difficult, if not almost impossible, to conduct an investigation under those circumstances... Looking ahead, there needs to be a better mechanism in extraordinary circumstances - like Watergate and Russian interference in the 2016 election - that allows for the appointment of a truly independent special prosecutor. We were lucky to get the Mueller report, but Mr. Mueller was acting under restraints. Unfortunately history tells us that we will need special counsels in the years ahead, under extraordinary circumstances, and like we did with Watergate, that office should have true independence to protect our country and Constitution.” UK News US Russia Crime Science & Health Politics Society Law Keir Starmer Jeremy Corbyn Social media Boris Johnson Brexit slavery Donald Trump Russia US election 2016#world_news
The Guardian UK
London, United Kingdom · 2 days ago
Observer culture quiz: from Die Hard to the price of heroin
Test your arts knowledge with these questions from the Observer’s criticsWhich actor has played the most comic book characters? Halle BerryJosh BrolinChris EvansWhich of following is true of the 1988 action movie Die Hard? It was Alan Rickman’s feature film debutIt was originally set at EasterIt was banned in GermanyWhich of the following films was Joaquin Phoenix not Oscar-nominated for?The MasterWalk the LineYou Were Never Really HereWhich artist had a semi-circular sculpture room in his Antwerp house, with a round skylight to give perfectly even light?RubensVan DyckRodinWhich painter died after falling from scaffolding while painting a fresco in Cádiz?GoyaMurilloEl GrecoWhich of Gustav Mahler’s nine completed symphonies is the longest?No 2 “Resurrection”No 3No 8 “Symphony of a Thousand” Which one of the following places is not the title of a work by Gustav Holst?HammersmithBrook GreenShepherd’s BushTom Baker, the fourth Doctor, was working part-time on a building site when he secured the role, and thus a certain immortality among Doctor Who fans, after BBC executives saw a feature film in which he had a major role. The film was a fantasy notable for one name, to which theScottish National Gallery of Modern Art is soon to devote an entire retrospective exhibition. Which name?Serge DanotRay HarryhausenLouis MalleActor Leo McKern made Rumpole of the Bailey his own in the series that ran from 1978. John Mortimer also adapted his creation for a radio series, and among those who “were” Rumpole on the radio was which actor, later to find arguably greater plaudits elsewhere?Benedict (Sherlock) Cumberbatch Shaun (Endeavour) EvansRichard E (Withnail) GrantHoneysuckle, Perdita and Rollo are all sibling actors from one family, and, in addition to possessing one of the most deliciously moreish first-name/surname combinations in television, Honeysuckle was phenomenal in the ever underrated Foyle’s War. What is that surname? WeeksBrooksWandersThe artist Paula Rego based a triptych on a play by which 20th-century dramatist?Martin McDonaghCaryl ChurchillSarah KaneWhich London theatre was once a butcher’s shop?AlmeidaDonmarYoung VicI Don’t Want to Talk About It was a No 1 for Rod Stewart, but a song originally by whom?Neil YoungCrazy HorseCrosby, Stills, Nash and YoungWho assured us The Revolution Will Not Be Televised?Grandmaster FlashThe Last PoetsGil Scott-HeronWho sang: “Alabama’s got me so upset, Tennessee made me lose my rest, and everybody knows about Mississippi, goddam!”Curtis MayfieldKendrick LamarNina SimoneHow much did Lou Reed pay for heroin on the Velvet Underground’s I’m Waiting for the Man?$17$26$43Who worked with both penguins and pigs?Edwin LutyensBerthold LubetkinJohn Warren BarryWho designed a cowshed shaped like a cow?Jean-Jacques LequeuJean-Jacques LavacheClaude-Nicolas Ledoux18 and above.Perfection! Well done you!17 and above.Clever clogs!16 and above.Clever clogs!15 and above.OK you're good14 and above.OK you're good13 and above.Decent attempt!12 and above.Decent attempt!11 and above.Not bad!10 and above.Not bad!9 and above.Pretty meh8 and above.Pretty meh7 and above.Nothing to shout about6 and above.Nothing to shout about5 and above.Pretty poor4 and above.Poor3 and above.Woeful2 and above.Woeful 0 and above.Oh dear1 and above.Oh dear Continue reading...#culture#film#music#classical_music#architecture#television#art #art_and_design#television_&_radio
Giorgi Gvajaia
Tbilisi, Georgia · 1 year ago
Sorry tourists, Amsterdam doesn't want you anymore❌👇🏻 (CNN) — Famous for its tolerance as much as its narrow houses and broad canals, Amsterdam is undergoing a radical change of attitude when it comes to the millions of tourists that flock to see it each year. Tolerance, it seems, has reached its limits in the Dutch capital, which is now actively urging visitors to head elsewhere as frustrated locals complain of feeling besieged by visitors using the city's bicycle-thronged streets as a travel playground. "The pressure is very high," says Ellen van Loon, a partner at Dutch architectural firm OMA who is involved in adapting the city for the future. "We don't want to turn into a Venice. The problem we are currently facing is that Amsterdam is so loved by tourists, we just have so many coming to the city." While Van Loon acknowledges the positive aspects of tourism, which earns the Dutch economy around 82 billion euros ($91.5 billion) a year, like many locals she's worried that soaring visitor numbers are destroying the soul of this vibrant cosmopolitan city. Like Venice and other destinations across Europe, Amsterdam has become a byword for overtourism -- a phenomenon closely linked to the rise in cheaper air travel that has seen visitors flood certain places, often spoiling the very spot they came to enjoy. While some cities are still formulating ways to cope, Amsterdam -- where a decade-long surge in visitor numbers is forecast to continue, rising from 18 million in 2018 to 42 million in 2030, or more than 50 times the current population -- has simply decided it's had enough. CNN Travel's Richard Quest meets Reinier Sijpkens on board his musical boat. Netherlands tourist officials recently took the bold decision to stop advertising the country as a tourist destination. Their "Perspective 2030″ report, published earlier this year, stated that the focus will now be on "destination management" rather than "destination promotion." The document also outlines the country's future strategy, acknowledging that Amsterdam's livability will be severely impacted by "visitor overload" if action isn't taken. Solutions listed include working to dissuade groups of "nuisance" visitors by either limiting or completely shutting down "accommodation and entertainment products" aimed at them, as well as spreading visitors to other parts of the Netherlands. Some of these measures have already come into play. Last year, the famous "I amsterdam" sign was removed from outside the Rijksmuseum, the city's main art gallery, at the request of the city of Amsterdam, as it was "drawing too big of a crowd to an already limited space. Measures have also been taken to discourage travelers from visiting some of Amsterdam's seedier tourist hotspots. Earlier this year, the city government announced it will end tours of the Red Light District in central Amsterdam, citing concerns that sex workers are being treated as a tourist attraction. One of Amsterdam's most famous residents, Anne died in a concentration camp in 1945 at the age of 15. "We pride ourselves on being a city which is tolerant. A city where people can be themselves, which is true," says museum director Ronald Leopold, one of the guardians of Anne's diary and legacy. "But we also have these dark pages, and these are probably the darkest." According to Leopald, around half of the 1.3 million people who visit the Anne Frank House each year are under the age of 30. "I think it's increasingly important to learn about what happened here during World War II and the Holocaust," he adds. Like many other locals, architect Van Loon fears that Amsterdam, which came in 23rd place on Euromonitor International's report on the Top 100 City Destinations in 2018, is dangerously close to losing its unique allure forever. "The reason tourists come here is because there's something in the character of Amsterdam they love," she explains. "But at a certain point, when the amount of tourists is increasing and increasing, they actually kill what they loved in the first place."
The Week UK
London, United Kingdom · 21 hours ago
Debate: can big countries eliminate coronavirus without a vaccine?
Description Four experts on whether immunity without a vaccine is a realistic goal Credits Olga Maltseva/AFP/Getty Alt Text A coronavirus vaccine research lab in Russia Four experts on whether immunity without a vaccine is a realistic goal In Depth The Week Staff Monday, July 13, 2020 - 10:14am Angharad Davies, Swansea University; Andrew Lee, University of Sheffield; Jimmy Whitworth, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine; Lakshmi Manoharan, University of Oxford The UK should change its Covid-19 strategy to try to eliminate Covid-19 even without a vaccine rather than simply managing the disease, according to Independent SAGE, a group of scientists set up as an alternative to the government’s advisory body. New Zealand has effectively managed to eliminate the virus, but can states with much larger, denser populations that have experienced much bigger outbreaks hope to do the same? Or is it more realistic to accept that the disease is likely to continue to circulate at some level and plan for that? We asked four experts for their views. Angharad Davies, clinical associate professor in microbiology at Swansea University Elimination or near-elimination in the UK would require ambition and huge effort, organisation and resource but I believe it is possible. The effort would mean accepting fewer freedoms in the medium term. Crucially, it would rely on trust in authority and willingness to comply with restrictions. The incentive would be that, if we achieved elimination, we could go back to a state closer to normal, and a healthier local economy even without a vaccine. The effort would have to be sustained until then, and if no effective vaccine transpires – which is possible – then the question is how long this approach could justifiably continue in the face of a virus endemic globally. Lakshmi Manoharan, medical epidemiologist at the University of Oxford Suppressing the virus to a low level before allowing economic and social activity to resume as normal is important. Doing otherwise will risk the possibility of the UK having to go in and out of lockdown numerous times. That would be more harmful for society and the economy, compared to implementing more stringent measures in the short term. Recent studies have shown that the number of people with Covid-19 antibodies in coronavirus hotspots such as Wuhan and Spain is still low. This means that despite high numbers of cases and extensive community transmission, the majority of the population is still susceptible to the virus. Allowing economic and social life to resume while this is the case and in the absence of a vaccine may lead to a larger second wave of infection. The emphasis should be on strong measures such as border quarantines and a robust test, trace and isolate system to reduce infection rates before relaxing economic measures, opening schools and allowing “air bridges”. We need to focus on reducing the amount of community transmission first, which allows for spread of infection into our most vulnerable populations. Jimmy Whitworth, professor of international public health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine See related Coronavirus: the vaccines on trial - and when they may be ready Coronavirus: why antibody rates vary so widely from place to place Herd immunity doubts as Spanish study finds just 5% of population have Covid antibodies We need a sense of proportion in countries that have reduced the total mortality rate to normal levels, as the UK has now done, showing that the first peak of the epidemic has passed. Once the number of new cases is under good control (one new case a day for every million of population is reasonable) we can allow social and economic life to resume. We can also shift more attention to general physical and mental health. We need to continue to maintain some physical distancing measures, combined with effective testing and contract tracing to prevent the inevitable clusters expanding into a second wave. But to try to eliminate all cases, and to sustain a zero-Covid state, would take enormous resources. This would produce diminishing returns as the number of cases goes down – and other aspects of life would suffer. We have seen this with countries attempting polio elimination, where routine health services may suffer, and with malaria elimination where the cost of averting each case rapidly increases as the number of cases goes down. Getting the number of cases down to manageable levels might eventually lead to zero cases temporarily, but we do not currently have effective measures to keep it at zero. In particular, border quarantines are not likely to be effective unless rigorously and universally applied with consequent disruption of all business travel, tourism and international trade. Border quarantine won’t be effective unless it is universal. Nick Ansell/PA Wire/PA Images Andrew Lee, reader in global public health at the University of Sheffield Elimination of Covid-19 in high-income countries is both possible and realistic. Ebola elimination was achieved in parts of Africa through disease control measures rather than a vaccine, including disease surveillance, infection control, changing social norms (for example around physical contact) and public communications. This demonstrates elimination is possible even in low and middle-income countries with fewer resources. The key determinants, as with all infectious disease control programmes, are the political and societal will to achieve this. Because it requires a multi-pronged approach, it needs resourcing, leadership and commitment to deliver. So the question becomes: “What are we prepared to pay or sacrifice to achieve this?” But in our interconnected globalised world it is not enough to eliminate the virus in just a few countries. Countries where the disease is endemic act as reservoirs of infection and can reinfect others. This is a global health threat that requires global leadership and coordinated action if we are to eliminate it. Angharad Davies, clinical associate professor at the Swansea University; Andrew Lee, reader in global public health at the University of Sheffield; Jimmy Whitworth, professor of international public health at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine; Lakshmi Manoharan, medical epidemiologist at the University of Oxford This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. UK News World News Politics Society Coronavirus Covid-19 Vaccines Lockdown vaccine #science_&_health
The Guardian UK
London, United Kingdom · 20 hours ago
Kelly Preston: a classy actor who graduated from teen-movie roles to darker and funnier parts
After starting out with romantic-interest characters, Preston evolved into a smart, subversive performer – most notably in the hit romcom Jerry MaguireIn some ways, Kelly Preston’s most famous role was the one outside the movies: as John Travolta’s wife. They married in 1991 and became probably the most devotedly uxorious Hollywood couple since Joanne Woodward and Paul Newman. Preston and Travolta have a great sexy-funny dance routine together in the 1989 comedy The Experts, which is how they met. Preston put her acting career on hold for some of the 90s while she and Travolta started a family: having two sons, Jett and Benjamin, and a daughter, Ella. Heartrendingly, Jett died of a seizure at the age of 16, a memory which adds a new layer of sadness to today’s news, and a new layer of sombre reflection about the great pressure that woman in public life is expected to undergo.In her 20s, Preston got sexy supporting-cast Hollywood roles in movies like the 1988 box office smash Twins, starring Arnold Schwarzenegger and Danny DeVito as the bizarrely un-similar titular siblings. Preston played Marnie, the woman who marries Schwarzenegger’s gentle giant while Chloe Webb plays her twin sister Linda who is paired off with wisecracking DeVito — and it is a measure of the sexist-stereotyping of Hollywood that while the men are supposed to be hilariously different, she and Webb are the non-twins playing regular twins with 80s big hair, basically indistinguishable not just from each other but all the other “sexy” roles that Hollywood compels its female stars to fit into. Two years earlier, she had been in a quintessentially 80s teen comedy Mischief — the kind of movie which lived endlessly on in VHS rental outlets throughout the world — playing the hot blonde fantasy object of the shy adolescent boy. Continue reading...#film#comedy_films#drama_films#john_travolta #jerry_maguire#twins#arnold_schwarzenegger#culture#comedy