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Winnie the Pooh
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Mariam Chabrava
Senaki · 3 months ago

,,Where are we going Pooh? - home piglet. We’re going home, because that’s the best thing to do right now.,, ❤️ისიც გვირჩევს სახლში ყოფნას ❣️🙏

#goodplaces #home #stayathome Senaki

Tbilisi

Georgia
Mariam Chabrava
Senaki · 3 months ago
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The Week UK
London, United Kingdom · 20 hours ago
Instant Opinion: Keir Starmer must offer more than ‘not being Jeremy Corbyn’
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The Covid lockdown may have given Starmer a longer period to bed in and might even allow him to have an effective relaunch on the other side of this crisis. From the perspective of a former member, Starmer represents a breath of fresh air for most Labour supporters after five fraught years. But a sense of relief won’t be enough for all those red wall voters, because – and I speak from experience – once you get out of the habit of voting Labour, it’s harder than you might expect to get back into it.” 2. Nesrine Malik in The Guardian in defence of those decried as ‘online mobs’ The ‘cancel culture’ war is really about old elites losing power in the social media age See related What is cancel culture? “Whenever I talk to people who are suddenly concerned about ‘cancel culture’ or ‘online mobs’, my first thought is always: ‘Where have you been for the last decade?’ I’ve been online long enough and, like many others, been receiving criticism and abuse online for long enough, to know that what some see as a new pattern of virtual censure by moral purists is mostly a story about the internet, not ideology or identity. If critics of ‘cancel culture’ are worried about opinions, posts and writings being constantly patrolled by a growing group of haters, then I am afraid they are extremely late to the party. I cannot remember a time where I have written or posted anything without thinking: ‘How many ways can this possibly be misconstrued, and can I defend it if it were?’ It’s not even a conscious thought process now, it’s instinct.” 3. Sean O’Grady in The Independent on the recovery of the British economy Forget global Britain - thanks to Brexit, coronavirus and a trade war with China, we’re losing our grip “There’s something heroic about Britain trying to chuck its weight around this way, and of course no one wants to do business with bullies and tyrants. But still, if the British economy is going to recover from the coronavirus-induced recession and go on to grow in the 2020s it will need its friends and its markets, and the British now seem to intent on blanking virtually everyone. The opportunities seem to be contracting rather than expanding. 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Looking ahead, there needs to be a better mechanism in extraordinary circumstances - like Watergate and Russian interference in the 2016 election - that allows for the appointment of a truly independent special prosecutor. We were lucky to get the Mueller report, but Mr. Mueller was acting under restraints. Unfortunately history tells us that we will need special counsels in the years ahead, under extraordinary circumstances, and like we did with Watergate, that office should have true independence to protect our country and Constitution.” UK News US Russia Crime Science & Health Politics Society Law Keir Starmer Jeremy Corbyn Social media Boris Johnson Brexit slavery Donald Trump Russia US election 2016#world_news
The Week UK
London, United Kingdom · 17 minutes ago
Reaction: second Covid wave ‘could kill 120,000’ in UK this winter
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Keso Bigvava
Tbilisi, Georgia · 3 months ago
A letter to the UK from Italy: this is what we know about your future
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Giorgi Gvajaia
Tbilisi, Georgia · 1 year ago
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Middleeast Report
Tbilisi, Georgia · 2 months ago
საპროტესტო აქცია “დისტანციის” დაცვით
ლიბანში საპროტესო აქციები არ წყდება. ოქტომბერში დაწყებული აქციები დრემდე გრძელდება, მიუხედავად იმისა, რომ ქვეყანაში კარანტინი და საგანგებო მდგომარეობა არის გამოცხადებული. დემონსტრანტები პირადი ტრანსპორტით, მანქანებით, სკუტერებით და ა.შ., გამოყენებით გამოვიდნენ ბეირუტის ცენტრალურ მოედნაზე შეძახელებით “რევოლუცია”. “No one has a job anymore…Salaries keep doing down. We’re in the streets because nothing has changed since we left,” said Ali Haidar, a protester wearing a face mask in central Beirut. “The state left us with two choices: we either die from hunger or we die from the disease…Let us at least die taking a stand.” პანდემიამ კიდევ უფრო დაამძიმა ლიბანელების ფინანსური მდგომარეობა. მოსახლეობა შიმშილის პირას დგას, ხოლო ახალ მთავრობას ამ კრიზისის დაძლევის რაიმე კონკრეტული გეგმა არ აქვს. ჯერ კიდევ პანდემიის დაწყებამდე, მსოფლიო ბანკი აცხადებდა, რომ 2020 წელს ლიბანელების 40% გაღარიბდება, თუმცა ლიბანის ეკონომიკის მინიტრი ამას იგნორირებდა. 1975-1990 წლებში ქვეყანაში სამოქალაქო ომი მიმდინარეობდა. იქიდან მოყოლებული ლიბანი კრიზისშია. მთავარ პრობლემას წარმოაგენს კორუფცია, უმუშევრობა და სიღარიბე, რამაც საბოლოოდ 2019 წლის ოქტომბერში იფეთქა და რის გამოც ყოფილ პრემირ მინსტრ ჰარირის თანამდებობის დატოვება მოუწია. “We’re all taking precautions and sitting in cars,” said Nur Bassam, 30, a protester taking part in the convoy in Beirut. “But things have become unbearable, we should speak up…, especially for people sitting at home who can’t work and provide food for their families.” რას მოიმოქმედებს ლიბანის ხელისუფლება ან რა ანტი-კრიზისულ გეგმას წარადგენს, ჯერ ჯერობით უცნობია?! #politics #news #opinion #events #world #lebanon #protests #pandemy #coronavirus #Reuters #middle #east #policy
Nino Kakulia
Poti, Georgia · 2 months ago
საქართველოში პანდემიის დასასრული იქნება ?!
97%-იანი ალბათობით საქართველოში კორონავირუსის პანდემია 6 ივნისს დასრულდება 🇬🇪🙏 ინფორმაციას ამის შესახებ სინგაპურის ტექნოლოგიების და დიზაინის უნივერსიტეტის (SUTD) მკვლევარები აქვეყნებენ, რომლებმაც გამოითვალეს კორონოვირუსის პანდემიის დასრულების ვადები სხვადასხვა ქვეყნებში და მათ შორის საქართველოში 🇬🇪🙏#coronavirus #covid19 #virus #19 #stayathome #home #politics #news #opinion #photo #business #georgia #საქართველო #გახარია #სინგაპური #დარჩისახლში #კორონავირუსი #კოვიდ19 #კორონა
Mariam Chabrava
Senaki, Georgia · 3 months ago
დარჩი სახლში
მარნეულის და ბოლნისის მაგალითი კიდევ ერთხელ გვაჩვენებს, თუ როგორი აუცილებელია სახლში დარჩენა და სიფრთხილის ზომების გათვალისწინება ❗️❗️❗️ #დარჩისახლში #stayathome Tbilisi Marneuli Bolnisi
Mariam Chabrava
Senaki, Georgia · 3 months ago
დარჩი სახლში, stay at home, stop covid-19
სამედიცინო სფეროს წარმომადგენლები, რომლებიც თავის თავს აყენებენ საფრთხის წინაშე , ჩვენს დასაცავად, მოგვიწოდებენ სახლში დარჩენისკენ ❗️❣️ Tbilisi #stayathome #stopcovid19
Kato Malania
Tbilisi, Georgia · 2 months ago
ფარფალე მაწვნის სოუსით
ეს უგემრიელესი რაღაც სულ 15 წუთში შეგიძლიათ მოამზადოთ სულ სამი ინგრედიენტით (მარილი არ ითვლება😁) ქვაბში ჩაასხამთ ზეთს და შეწვავთ მაკარონს დაბალ ცეცხლზე. როცა კარგად შეიწვევა დაამატებთ ადუღებულ წყალს, მარილს და რაიმე სუნელს (მე სვანურ მარილს ვხმარობ). მოხარშავთ დარბილებამდე და უკვე სრულიად მზას დაუმატებთ ორ კოვზ მაწონს. საოცრებაა😙👌🏻#home #homemade #stayathome #stayhome #culinary #fun #deliciuos #opinion Tbilisi
Giorgi Gvajaia
Tbilisi, Georgia · 1 year ago
Jony Ive: I feel like I’m living two years in the future. Read more👇🏻 Because his job involves dreaming up Apple’s next products, Jony Ive says he feels like he’s constantly living “two years in the future.” That’s one of the insights that emerges from a new interview with Ive and Kim Jones, creative director of Dior Men. While short on specifics about Apple’s future plans, it sheds light on Ive’s design process. It also reveals some of the challenges that accompany his role. Other interesting insights include Ive discussing the frustration involved when innovating right on the cusp of what’s possible: ✔️ “[Sometimes] we have an idea that’s beyond the enabling technology. When we’re absolutely certain that the idea can’t even be prototyped. So often, we have ideas and we’re waiting and working on the technology that will enable the idea. It’s just a strange sort of patience that’s necessary when you feel really good about a direction and an idea, and you just have to wait for the technology to mature.” ✔️ “We have a big team of material scientists and what we’ve found is that with the material, there are so many different attributes that range from a sort of physical performance to an environmental performance, down to color and texture. We’re constantly either improving existing materials we use, like glass and aluminum, and then we’re developing new materials that might have a very specific application or that might have much broader applications. So much of our design starts with the material and trying to better understand the material.” Elsewhere in the conversation, Ive describes himself as “absurdly, frantically inquisitive.” He also says a key challenge is making sure the products he helps shape live up to Apple’s values. The complete interview will appear in the new issue of Document magazine, available for pre-order now. You can also read the full interview online. It definitely won’t clue you into Apple’s future product pipeline. But it’s an interesting (albeit designer-y) discussion about Ive’s important job.