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ვატო საყვარელიძე
Tbilisi · 1 year ago

Experience is not what happens to you; it's what you do with what happens to you.

Aldous Huxley


ვატო საყვარელიძე
Tbilisi · 1 year ago
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The Guardian UK
London · 3 days ago
Classical home listening: Voces8, the Hermes Experiment and Llŷr Williams
Voces8 celebrate 15 years in impeccable style; a notable debut from the Hermes Experiment; and Llŷr Williams not in Mexico…• After Silence by Voces8 (Voces8 Records), directed by Barnaby Smith, wasn’t devised for the state we are in but might well have been. This wide-ranging double album, marking the vocal ensemble’s 15th birthday, is in four sections: Remembrance, Devotion, Redemption and Elemental. Repertoire spans the centuries, from Byrd, Monteverdi and Bach to Mahler, Britten and Eric Whitacre, with contributions, variously, from soprano Mary Bevan, oboist Nick Deutsch and members of the Academy of Ancient Music.If you respond to the beauty of perfectly blended unblemished voices, this outstanding collection is for you. If you want rough edges look elsewhere. The album’s theme, borrowing from an essay by Aldous Huxley, who in turn borrowed from Shakespeare, is music’s power to express the inexpressible. Watch Voces8 (1 August) and other top choral groups performing live in HD as part of online festival Live From London (1 August-3 October). Continue reading... #classical_music#choral_music#culture#music
Keso Bigvava
Tbilisi · 3 months ago
A letter to the UK from Italy: this is what we know about your future
The acclaimed Italian novelist Francesca Melandri, who has been under lockdown in Rome for almost three weeks due to the Covid-19 outbreak, has written a letter to fellow Europeans “from your future”, laying out the range of emotions people are likely to go through over the coming weeks. I am writing to you from Italy, which means I am writing from your future. We are now where you will be in a few days. The epidemic’s charts show us all entwined in a parallel dance. We are but a few steps ahead of you in the path of time, just like Wuhan was a few weeks ahead of us. We watch you as you behave just as we did. You hold the same arguments we did until a short time ago, between those who still say “it’s only a flu, why all the fuss?” and those who have already understood. Coronavirus: the week explained - sign up for our email newsletter Read more As we watch you from here, from your future, we know that many of you, as you were told to lock yourselves up into your homes, quoted Orwell, some even Hobbes. But soon you’ll be too busy for that. First of all, you’ll eat. Not just because it will be one of the few last things that you can still do. You’ll find dozens of social networking groups with tutorials on how to spend your free time in fruitful ways. You will join them all, then ignore them completely after a few days. You’ll pull apocalyptic literature out of your bookshelves, but will soon find you don’t really feel like reading any of it. You’ll eat again. You will not sleep well. You will ask yourselves what is happening to democracy. You’ll have an unstoppable online social life – on Messenger, WhatsApp, Skype, Zoom… Advertisement You will miss your adult children like you never have before; the realisation that you have no idea when you will ever see them again will hit you like a punch in the chest. Old resentments and falling-outs will seem irrelevant. You will call people you had sworn never to talk to ever again, so as to ask them: “How are you doing?” Many women will be beaten in their homes. You will wonder what is happening to all those who can’t stay home because they don’t have one. You will feel vulnerable when going out shopping in the deserted streets, especially if you are a woman. You will ask yourselves if this is how societies collapse. Does it really happen so fast? You’ll block out these thoughts and when you get back home you’ll eat again. You will put on weight. You’ll look for online fitness training. You’ll laugh. You’ll laugh a lot. You’ll flaunt a gallows humour you never had before. Even people who’ve always taken everything dead seriously will contemplate the absurdity of life, of the universe and of it all. You will make appointments in the supermarket queues with your friends and lovers, so as to briefly see them in person, all the while abiding by the social distancing rules. You will count all the things you do not need. The true nature of the people around you will be revealed with total clarity. You will have confirmations and surprises. Literati who had been omnipresent in the news will disappear, their opinions suddenly irrelevant; some will take refuge in rationalisations which will be so totally lacking in empathy that people will stop listening to them. People whom you had overlooked, instead, will turn out to be reassuring, generous, reliable, pragmatic and clairvoyant. Those who invite you to see all this mess as an opportunity for planetary renewal will help you to put things in a larger perspective. You will also find them terribly annoying: nice, the planet is breathing better because of the halved CO2 emissions, but how will you pay your bills next month? You will not understand if witnessing the birth of a new world is more a grandiose or a miserable affair. You will play music from your windows and lawns. When you saw us singing opera from our balconies, you thought “ah, those Italians”. But we know you will sing uplifting songs to each other too. And when you blast I Will Survive from your windows, we’ll watch you and nod just like the people of Wuhan, who sung from their windows in February, nodded while watching us.#Many of you will fall asleep vowing that the very first thing you’ll do as soon as lockdown is over is file for divorce. Many children will be conceived. Your children will be schooled online. They’ll be horrible nuisances; they’ll give you joy. Elderly people will disobey you like rowdy teenagers: you’ll have to fight with them in order to forbid them from going out, to get infected and die. You will try not to think about the lonely deaths inside the ICU. You’ll want to cover with rose petals all medical workers’ steps. You will be told that society is united in a communal effort, that you are all in the same boat. It will be true. This experience will change for good how you perceive yourself as an individual part of a larger whole.#italyItaly
Tata Kvara
Tbilisi · 1 year ago
“If you haven't yet decided where to spend your summer vacation, let me recommend visiting Georgia and give you just a few (out of MANY) reasons why: 1. It's cheap! Traveling here, especially with Dollars or Euros, you will feel like a king! to give you an example: a cab ride within most parts of the city center are around 2-3 Dollars! 2. It's beautiful and diverse! No matter what you are into: nature, hiking/camping, historical sights, if you love the mountains or the sea, vibrant city, or intimate village life, you can experience it all here! And since everything is so close, you don't have to choose! 3. The food and wine is amazing! If you make decisions with your stomach, well, this is the place for you. As the cradle of wine, you can taste over 8000 years of wine-making tradition, along with our diverse, delicious choice of traditional and fusion dishes. 4. If you love music and a good time: If you are into electronic music, love festivals and the club scene, well good news: Tbilisi is the New Berlin! Check out our world-renowned club Bassiani or attend the ECOWAVES Festival by the sea! 5. If you will go to great extents to capture that perfect Instagram pic, look no further! you will find thousands of picture perfect instagramable places to create your next, original story/post. 6. And last, but not least: If you like standing up to dictators and bullies and like being part of a good cause, if you believe in democracy and human rights and like rooting for the underdog: As you may have heard, 20% of Georgia has been occupied by Russia since the 2008 war. In the midst of rising tensions, Russian president Putin has blocked flights from Russia to Georgia with the aim of crippling our economy, which largely thrives on tourism, especially Russian tourists. By visiting Georgia you'll not only have a wonderful, memorable trip, but will succeed in fighting back an oppressive, backward, fucked up regime.” Please share to spread the word!
Keso Bigvava
Tbilisi · 1 month ago
These 12 Carrie Bradshaw quotes will have you feeling nostalgic for Sex and the City
"The most exciting, challenging, and significant relationship of all is the one you have with yourself. And if you find someone to love the you you love, well that's just fabulous." “Men who are too good looking are never good in bed because they never had to be” "Sometimes we need to stop analyzing the past, stop planning the future, stop figuring out precisely how we feel, stop deciding exactly what we want, and just see what happens." "Maybe our girlfriends are our soulmates and guys are just people to have fun with." "Maybe the past is like an anchor, holding us back. Maybe you have to let go of who you were to become who you will be." "Maybe the best any of us can do is not to quit, play the hand we've been given, and accessorize the outfit we got." "Don't forget to fall in love with yourself first."#CarrieBradshaw #Quotes #Nostalgic #Love #sexandthecity #Fashion Tbilisi
Giorgi Gvajaia
Tbilisi · 1 year ago
Sorry tourists, Amsterdam doesn't want you anymore❌👇🏻 (CNN) — Famous for its tolerance as much as its narrow houses and broad canals, Amsterdam is undergoing a radical change of attitude when it comes to the millions of tourists that flock to see it each year. Tolerance, it seems, has reached its limits in the Dutch capital, which is now actively urging visitors to head elsewhere as frustrated locals complain of feeling besieged by visitors using the city's bicycle-thronged streets as a travel playground. "The pressure is very high," says Ellen van Loon, a partner at Dutch architectural firm OMA who is involved in adapting the city for the future. "We don't want to turn into a Venice. The problem we are currently facing is that Amsterdam is so loved by tourists, we just have so many coming to the city." While Van Loon acknowledges the positive aspects of tourism, which earns the Dutch economy around 82 billion euros ($91.5 billion) a year, like many locals she's worried that soaring visitor numbers are destroying the soul of this vibrant cosmopolitan city. Like Venice and other destinations across Europe, Amsterdam has become a byword for overtourism -- a phenomenon closely linked to the rise in cheaper air travel that has seen visitors flood certain places, often spoiling the very spot they came to enjoy. While some cities are still formulating ways to cope, Amsterdam -- where a decade-long surge in visitor numbers is forecast to continue, rising from 18 million in 2018 to 42 million in 2030, or more than 50 times the current population -- has simply decided it's had enough. CNN Travel's Richard Quest meets Reinier Sijpkens on board his musical boat. Netherlands tourist officials recently took the bold decision to stop advertising the country as a tourist destination. Their "Perspective 2030″ report, published earlier this year, stated that the focus will now be on "destination management" rather than "destination promotion." The document also outlines the country's future strategy, acknowledging that Amsterdam's livability will be severely impacted by "visitor overload" if action isn't taken. Solutions listed include working to dissuade groups of "nuisance" visitors by either limiting or completely shutting down "accommodation and entertainment products" aimed at them, as well as spreading visitors to other parts of the Netherlands. Some of these measures have already come into play. Last year, the famous "I amsterdam" sign was removed from outside the Rijksmuseum, the city's main art gallery, at the request of the city of Amsterdam, as it was "drawing too big of a crowd to an already limited space. Measures have also been taken to discourage travelers from visiting some of Amsterdam's seedier tourist hotspots. Earlier this year, the city government announced it will end tours of the Red Light District in central Amsterdam, citing concerns that sex workers are being treated as a tourist attraction. One of Amsterdam's most famous residents, Anne died in a concentration camp in 1945 at the age of 15. "We pride ourselves on being a city which is tolerant. A city where people can be themselves, which is true," says museum director Ronald Leopold, one of the guardians of Anne's diary and legacy. "But we also have these dark pages, and these are probably the darkest." According to Leopald, around half of the 1.3 million people who visit the Anne Frank House each year are under the age of 30. "I think it's increasingly important to learn about what happened here during World War II and the Holocaust," he adds. Like many other locals, architect Van Loon fears that Amsterdam, which came in 23rd place on Euromonitor International's report on the Top 100 City Destinations in 2018, is dangerously close to losing its unique allure forever. "The reason tourists come here is because there's something in the character of Amsterdam they love," she explains. "But at a certain point, when the amount of tourists is increasing and increasing, they actually kill what they loved in the first place."
Ana Liparteliani
Tbilisi · 1 year ago
For all my foreign friends, we NEED your help! Dear all, Georgians want to get their message across. Our country is in an ongoing crisis. For those of you who don’t know, on June 20, a Russian lawmaker, Sergei Gavrilov, led an interparliamentary grouping on Orthodoxy in Tbilisi and was allowed to chair a session of parliament. Outraged protesters took it to the streets and protested visit of Russian delegation, headed by Gavrilov, who has previously backed the independence of the Georgian territories occupied by Russia. This sparked two nights of protests, with the third one happening tonight. During these days, more than 10,000 people protested outside the parliament building. On Friday, around midnight, after some of the protesters outside tried to storm the legislative building, WITHOUT ANY PRIOR WARNING, the riot police opened fire on the crowd with teargas, rubber bullets, and water cannons - leaving hundreds of protesters requiring medical treatment. Video and photographs showed people who appeared to have been injured by the rubber bullets, in the head, legs, and back. On Friday, following a night of violent unrest, in which more than 200 people were injured, 305 arrested, and two people lost eyes, Irakli Kobakhidze, the speaker of the Parliament resigned. But this is not even remotely close to what Georgian people demand. Russia, which occupies one-fifth of the country’s territory, has reacted indignantly to the protests, calling the events “an anti-Russian provocation”. Vladimir Putin has prohibited Russia’s airlines from flying to Georgia. The suspension of flights is intended to put pressure on Georgia’s tourism industry, which accounted for 7.6% of the country’s GDP in 2018. This decision will damage Georgian tourism industry and directly affect our economy. However, Georgians will always say NO to being economically dependent on our destructive, imperialist neighbor Russia. When utilizing power and force, Georgian law enforcement authorities did not act proportionately to the risk presented or tried to limit harm and damage. Subsequently, demonstrations continued to depict a vivid disappointment and dissatisfaction with the government. Demonstrations continue with the following demands: - Resignation of Minister of Internal Affairs (responsible for use of force against peaceful demonstrators) - Proportional Representation Elections of Parliament for 2020 - Liberation of innocent demonstrators from prison. Having said that, we want to ask the international community to help us by: 1. Providing empirically correct factual knowledge about the ongoing events. Please spread the word, contact all of your colleagues, family members, and friends who work in media and can, in this sense, impact the media climate by composing, sharing, promoting articles about the current Georgian crisis. 2. Giving Georgian tourism more international exposure. Research Georgia as an exotic tourist destination, and you will find all the proof you need. We need your support more than ever. After all, we are all global citizens, birthed by mother earth. “No one is free when others are oppressed.”
Giorgi Gvajaia
Tbilisi · 1 year ago
(CNN)Let's just call this reason No. 580 not to leave your kids alone with technology: They might lock you out of it. That's what happened over the weekend to Evan Osnos, a staff writer at The New Yorker and a fellow at the Brookings Institution. He put out a tweet -- or a cry for help -- letting the world know of the little situation his toddler put him in. "Uh, this looks fake but, alas, it's our iPad today after 3-year-old tried (repeatedly) to unlock. Ideas?" Osnos tweeted. A photo of the iPad's screen noted the device was disabled. It also had this mind-blowing message: "Try again in 25,536,442 minutes."
Mariam Khizanishvili
Tbilisi · 1 year ago
"Lily:Whats a soulmate? Dawson: It's a.. Well, it's like a best friend, but more. It's the one person in the world that knows you better than anyone else. It's someone who makes you a better person, well, actually they don't make you a better person... you do that yourself-- because they inspire you. A soulmate is someone who you carry with you forever. It's the one person who knew you, and accepted you, and believed in you before anyone else did or when no one else would. And no matter what happens.. you'll always love them." - Dawsons creek
The Guardian UK
London · 1 day ago
Eight go mad in Arizona: how a lockdown experiment went horribly wrong
In the 1990s, a troupe of hippies spent two years sealed inside a dome called Biosphere 2. They ended up starving and gasping for breath. As a new documentary Spaceship Earth tells their story, we meet the ‘biospherians’It sounds like a sci-fi movie, or the weirdest series of Big Brother ever. Eight volunteers wearing snazzy red jumpsuits seal themselves into a hi-tech glasshouse that’s meant to perfectly replicate Earth’s ecosystems. They end up starving, gasping for air and at each other’s throats – while the world’s media looks on.But the Biosphere 2 experiment really did happen. Running from 1991 to 1993, it is remembered as a failure, if it is remembered at all – a hubristic, pseudo-scientific experiment that was never going to accomplish its mission. However, as the new documentary Spaceship Earth shows, the escapade is a cautionary tale, now that the outside world – Biosphere 1, if you prefer – is itself coming to resemble an apocalyptic sci-fi world. Looking back, it’s amazing that Biosphere 2 even happened at all, not least because the people behind it started out as a hippy theatre group. Continue reading...#film #exploration#environment#human_biology#space#culture#social_history#plants #society#science#architecture#art_and_design#arizona#documentary_films#us_news #world_news
Tini Dumbadze
Batumi · 1 year ago
Imagine all the people living life in peace... Imagine, your next door neighbor invaded your house and took the rooms one by one, day by day. Imagine, your beloved ones are left behind the occupied rooms. It’s hard, right? That’s what’s been happening in Georgia for many and many years. That happens when you are bounded by country such as Russia... families are divided with barbed-wire fences. It’s been years people haven’t seen their houses... The Creeping Occupation moves deeper and deeper... 20 % of my Country is Occupied by Russia!!! #RussiaisanOccupier #StopRussianOccupation #რუსეთიოკუპანტია #არარუსულოკუპაციას #არარუსეთუმეებს!!!!!!!!