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Georgia Today
Tbilisi · 1 year ago

🎶American rock band Thirty Seconds to Mars will perform in the Black Sea Arena in Shekvetili near Batumi on 13th August.

🏷 Tickets will go on sale on May 20 and be priced from 50 to 200 Lari. They are available through tkt.ge and eventer.ge.


Georgia Today
Tbilisi · 1 year ago
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Georgia Today
Tsalenjikha · 1 year ago
✅🆕 The American pop/hip-hop group the Black Eyed Peas will open this year’s season at the Black Sea Arena in Guria, performing a concert on June 16. 🔖 Tickets go on sale at 20:00 on April 30 on the websites TKT.ge and Eventer.ge.
Georgia Today
Tbilisi · 1 year ago
🎙☝🏼Famous British singer - Jessie J will visit Tbilisi on 6th august. 👉🏼 She will perfom live show at the Black Sea Arena. 🔖 Tickets go on sale tomorrow at 20:00 on websites TKT.ge & Eventer.ge
The Week UK
London · 3 days ago
Instant Opinion: the year is 2022 - so ‘what does life look like’?
Credits Tomohiro Ohsumi/Getty Images Your guide to the best columns and commentary on Friday 10 July Reaction The Week Staff Friday, July 10, 2020 - 12:08pm The Week’s daily round-up highlights the five best opinion pieces from across the British and international media, with excerpts from each. 1. David Leonhardt in The New York Times on the post-coronavirus future It’s 2022. What Does Life Look Like? “It’s 2022, and the coronavirus has at long last been defeated. After a miserable year-and-a-half, alternating between lockdowns and new outbreaks, life can finally begin returning to normal. But it will not be the old normal. It will be a new world, with a reshaped economy, much as war and depression reordered life for previous generations. Thousands of stores and companies that were vulnerable before the virus arrived have disappeared. Dozens of colleges are shutting down, in the first wave of closures in the history of American higher education. People have also changed long-held patterns of behavior: Outdoor socializing is in, business trips are out. And American politics — while still divided in many of the same ways it was before the virus — has entered a new era. All of this, obviously, is conjecture. The future is unknowable. But the pandemic increasingly looks like one of the defining events of our time.” 2. Billy Bragg, musician and activist, in The Guardian on how speech is only free when everyone has a voice ‘Cancel culture’ doesn’t stifle debate, but it does challenge the old order See related Cartoon characters could be banned from junk food London Underground to consider ban on junk food adverts Children's online junk food ads banned by watchdog “The ability of middle-aged gatekeepers to control the agenda has been usurped by a new generation of activists who can spread information through their own networks, allowing them to challenge narratives promoted by the status quo. The great progressive movements of the 21st century have sprung from these networks: Black Lives Matter; #MeToo; Extinction Rebellion. While they may seem disparate in their aims, what they have in common is a demand for accountability. Although free speech remains the fundamental bedrock of a free society, for everyone to enjoy the benefits of freedom, liberty needs to be tempered by two further dimensions: equality and accountability. Without equality, those in power will use their freedom of expression to abuse and marginalise others. Without accountability, liberty can mutate into the most dangerous of all freedoms – impunity.” 3. Iain Martin in The Times on Rishi’s rapid rise Sunak’s road to No 10 gets bumpy from here “It is already possible to see how at some future critical moment in this pandemic, or when there is an electoral reverse or constitutional crisis, Mr Johnson could become the latest victim of Conservative Party ruthlessness. There are pitfalls for the chancellor, though. Mr Johnson is dangerously competitive. Soon, it will also be possible for opponents to label the chancellor Mr Unemployment. Often the Tory frontrunner doesn’t win and for all the spin that everything is lovely between Nos 10 and 11 right now, it won’t always be. A small but vicious band of Johnson ultra-loyalists will defend their man and their power. All that fun is to come. But it is worth pausing for a moment to admire the manner in which someone who just a year ago was serving as parliamentary under-secretary of state for local government rose to become the likely next prime minister.” 4. John T Bennett in The Independent on a president losing grip at the worst possible time I’ve documented Trump every day of his presidency — and now he’s in free-fall “The more Trump follows his instincts, the further he seems to fall. He has stumbled before during his term. But after watching every day of his presidency since he was sworn in on that grey day in January 2017, this correspondent sees a president in free-fall. He has no message for voters on why they should hand him a second term. His potential legal problems mounted Thursday when the Supreme Court ruled his office does not grant him automatic immunity from a Manhattan district attorney’s subpoena seeking his tax and financial records. His poll numbers are dismal. The virus is spreading again like wildfire. On issues from wearing masks to guard against Covid-carrying droplets ejected from our fellow humans to flying the Confederate flag to whether coronavirus is even that serious to the real state of the virus-hobbled economy, Trump’s know-it-all approach to life leaves him more and more isolated.” 5. Fraser Nelson in The Daily Telegraph on an obscured truth about Britain’s care chaos The real story behind Britain’s Covid care home crisis isn’t what you think “Care homes argue, still, that their business model depends on being able to pay people less than supermarkets do. Their complaint about Brexit, even now, is that it makes it harder for them to import cheap labour and keep wages down. Their bigger concern should be what the Covid crisis has shown about their ability to protect those in their care. Deciding what to do about care homes is, we’re told, high up on Boris Johnson’s list – but the more important point is what lessons can be learned now. If there is to be a second wave of Covid, it’s pretty clear what ought to happen: care home workers should be isolated and put up in a hotel if needs be. And – needless to say – forbidden from working from multiple homes. It will cost, but looking after the elderly can’t be done on the cheap. The last few months have proved, yet again, the real price of low-cost care.” UK News US Media Science & Health Politics Society Coronavirus Covid-19 Free speech Rishi Sunak Boris Johnson 10 Downing Street Donald Trump 2020 US election care homes#world_news
Georgia Today
Tbilisi · 1 year ago
🎶 Oto Nemsadze, the Georgian contender of 2019 Eurovision Song Contest (ESC) will perform on stage in the first semi-final of the musical competition number 11 on May 14. He will perform the entry song “Keep on Going” on stage. ✅ 👉🏼 Supporters of Georgian contestant have to watch the public broadcaster of the country where they live. They can vote by telephone and SMS through the numbers shown on the screen. Twenty calls can be sent from one number. 👉🏼Televoters can vote for Georgian contender from the following countries: Belarus, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Finland, Hungary, Montenegro, Poland, Serbia, Slovenia, Australia, Belgium, Estonia, Greece, Iceland, Portugal, San Marino, Israel, France, Spain. Voting for Oto Nemsadze can be implemented by phone and SMS through the numbers indicated on the banner👇🏼 ☝🏼 ESC 2019 will be held at Expo Tel Aviv, the city’s convention center; the show will consist of two semi-finals on 14 and 16 May, and the final on 18 May 2019. The Georgian First Channel will provide live transmission of the musical competition on May 14, 16 and 18 starting 23:00
The Guardian UK
London · 2 days ago
Planet of the apex: test your shark knowledge with our fin-tastic quiz
From shark heists to seafood scams, how much do you really know about these at-risk predators?What is the collective noun for sharks?A shiver of sharksA conspiracy of sharksA suit of sharksAn armoury of sharksWhich of these sharks is no fairytale?TrollElfGoblinLoch Ness Swell sharks can swallow water to make themselves appear bigger, and bark like a dog when lifted out of the water. They also give off an ethereal green glow: why?Toxic chemical spills have turned them greenThey eat a lot of bioluminescent planktonSo they can identify each other in the darkThey have faint genetic links to an alien species A celebrity great white shark known as Katherine, with 60,000 Twitter followers, works the waters off the North American coast. When she’s not breaking the internet (OK, the OCEARCH shark tracker site) with her location pings, she’s providing crucial learning about the mating habits of sexually mature great whites. How long is the gestation period for great white pups?18 months 3 months4 yearsNothing - they lay eggsWhich of these characters from JR Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings has a shark namesake?SauronFrodoGandalfGollumWhich of the following is untrue about the song Baby Shark (YouTube views as of publication: 5.9bn)?It is a tried-and-tested song for setting the pace of CPRPeople have reported that listening to the song backwards reveals satanic messagesIt was sung at a protest in Lebanon to soothe a toddler in his mum’s carNo one knows who created (and can be blamed for) the original baby sharkThe mako shark is the ocean's fastest, able to swim as fast as 35mph. What unusual attribute contributes to its speed?It uses its fins in a propeller motionIt blows water backwards from its mouthIt builds speed by leaping out of the waterIt is partially warm-bloodedFrilled sharks are one of the oldest species of shark in the world – mysterious ocean bottom-dwellers that resemble a cross between an eel and a shark. When do experts estimate this species appeared?65 million years ago – around the time a mass extinction wiped out the dinosaurs25 million years ago – when apes diverged from old world monkeys95 million years ago – in the last portion of 'the age of dinosaurs'200 million years ago – when the supercontinent Pangea began to break upWhich shark takes cylindrical chunks of flesh out of its prey – often much larger sharks and whales?Cookie-cutter sharkGulper sharkSponge-sucker sharkLemon sharkWhat did Donald Trump once tweet about sharks?Every time I speak of sharks I do so with great love and affection. They cannot help the fact that they were born fucked up!Obama's wind turbines kill millions of sharks in sharknados every year. The Paris climate agreement hurts Americans, sharks, and costs a fortuneSharks are last on my list – other than perhaps the losers and haters of the World!Sharks only bite do-nothing Democrats! Swim faster LOSERS!What method of repelling sharks is being trialled in Réunion Island in the Indian Ocean?Magnets disguised as kelp'Scaresharks'– giant inflatable sharksNets baited with chumPlaying jazz underwaterThe tasselled wobbegong is often found on coral reefs or near the shore in Australia, Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. What trick does it use to catch its food?Vigorously shakes its tassels to cause underwater waves to dislodge preyFilters fish and plankton through its open mouth as it movesSquirts a cloud of noxious gas to confuse its preyCamouflages itself as coral and wobbles its tail back and forth in a mesmerising dance to lure fishWhich of the following most accurately resembles how the skin of most sharks would feel under your hand?SilkLeatherSandpaperScalesMiss Helen, a female grey horn shark, was abducted from a US aquarium in 2018. How did they smuggle her out?Pretended she was a toy from the gift shopDressed her up as an employeeWheeled her out in a baby’s pramPretended to impound Miss Helen as evidence in a fake cocaine bustSharks are often caught as bycatch in the Mediterranean. According to the Italian coast guard and experts, what is shortfin mako or blue shark often fraudulently sold as?SwordfishCalamariChickenTunaWhat are the ampullae of Lorenzini?A species of shark found in the MediterraneanThe top sharks in a group that hunt togetherRoman shark godsThe system of electromagnetic receptors on a shark's snoutFish are friends (sometimes). There are many examples of sharks enjoying a gentler relationship with their surroundings than their reputation as mindless killers would suggest. Which of the following is untrue?Remora fish hitch rides on some shark speciesDolphins and sharks often work together to corner schools of fishSharks allow pilot fish to swim inside their mouths to pick food from their teethBonnethead sharks munch on seagrassWhat have scientists never seen a whale shark do?Give birthSurfaceChange directionFeedWhat great white shark mystery is concerning experts in Cape Town, South Africa?They found a skeleton of one on Table MountainThey've all disappearedThey’ve been propelling themselves on to beachesThey're eating the base of the harbour wallsIn May, customs officials made the biggest shark fin seizure in Hong Kong history: 26 tonnes, in two shipping containers from Ecuador. How many sharks were the fins taken from?50038,5002,00017,50020 and above.Congratulations – top sharking skills19 and above.Excellent shark skills. You are all about the apex18 and above.Excellent shark skills. You are all about the apex17 and above.Excellent shark skills. You are all about the apex16 and above.Excellent shark skills. You are all about the apex15 and above.Excellent shark skills. You are all about the apex14 and above.Excellent shark skills. You are all about the apex13 and above.Between a rock and a shark place. Just keep swimming – there’s more to learn12 and above.Between a rock and a shark place. Just keep swimming – there’s more to learn11 and above.Between a rock and a shark place. Just keep swimming – there’s more to learn10 and above.Between a rock and a shark place. Just keep swimming – there’s more to learn9 and above.Between a rock and a shark place. Just keep swimming – there’s more to learn8 and above.Between a rock and a shark place. Just keep swimming – there’s more to learn7 and above.Between a rock and a shark place. Just keep swimming – there’s more to learn6 and above.Your knowledge of sharks is as nonexistent as a sharknado5 and above.Your knowledge of sharks is as nonexistent as a sharknado4 and above.Your knowledge of sharks is as nonexistent as a sharknado3 and above.Your knowledge of sharks is as nonexistent as a sharknado2 and above.Your knowledge of sharks is as nonexistent as a sharknado0 and above.Your knowledge of sharks is as nonexistent as a sharknado1 and above.Your knowledge of sharks is as nonexistent as a sharknado Continue reading...#sharks#marine_life#environment#conservation #animals#wildlife#oceans
The Week UK
London · 1 day ago
Debate: can big countries eliminate coronavirus without a vaccine?
Description Four experts on whether immunity without a vaccine is a realistic goal Credits Olga Maltseva/AFP/Getty Alt Text A coronavirus vaccine research lab in Russia Four experts on whether immunity without a vaccine is a realistic goal In Depth The Week Staff Monday, July 13, 2020 - 10:14am Angharad Davies, Swansea University; Andrew Lee, University of Sheffield; Jimmy Whitworth, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine; Lakshmi Manoharan, University of Oxford The UK should change its Covid-19 strategy to try to eliminate Covid-19 even without a vaccine rather than simply managing the disease, according to Independent SAGE, a group of scientists set up as an alternative to the government’s advisory body. New Zealand has effectively managed to eliminate the virus, but can states with much larger, denser populations that have experienced much bigger outbreaks hope to do the same? Or is it more realistic to accept that the disease is likely to continue to circulate at some level and plan for that? We asked four experts for their views. Angharad Davies, clinical associate professor in microbiology at Swansea University Elimination or near-elimination in the UK would require ambition and huge effort, organisation and resource but I believe it is possible. The effort would mean accepting fewer freedoms in the medium term. Crucially, it would rely on trust in authority and willingness to comply with restrictions. The incentive would be that, if we achieved elimination, we could go back to a state closer to normal, and a healthier local economy even without a vaccine. The effort would have to be sustained until then, and if no effective vaccine transpires – which is possible – then the question is how long this approach could justifiably continue in the face of a virus endemic globally. Lakshmi Manoharan, medical epidemiologist at the University of Oxford Suppressing the virus to a low level before allowing economic and social activity to resume as normal is important. Doing otherwise will risk the possibility of the UK having to go in and out of lockdown numerous times. That would be more harmful for society and the economy, compared to implementing more stringent measures in the short term. Recent studies have shown that the number of people with Covid-19 antibodies in coronavirus hotspots such as Wuhan and Spain is still low. This means that despite high numbers of cases and extensive community transmission, the majority of the population is still susceptible to the virus. Allowing economic and social life to resume while this is the case and in the absence of a vaccine may lead to a larger second wave of infection. The emphasis should be on strong measures such as border quarantines and a robust test, trace and isolate system to reduce infection rates before relaxing economic measures, opening schools and allowing “air bridges”. We need to focus on reducing the amount of community transmission first, which allows for spread of infection into our most vulnerable populations. Jimmy Whitworth, professor of international public health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine See related Coronavirus: the vaccines on trial - and when they may be ready Coronavirus: why antibody rates vary so widely from place to place Herd immunity doubts as Spanish study finds just 5% of population have Covid antibodies We need a sense of proportion in countries that have reduced the total mortality rate to normal levels, as the UK has now done, showing that the first peak of the epidemic has passed. Once the number of new cases is under good control (one new case a day for every million of population is reasonable) we can allow social and economic life to resume. We can also shift more attention to general physical and mental health. We need to continue to maintain some physical distancing measures, combined with effective testing and contract tracing to prevent the inevitable clusters expanding into a second wave. But to try to eliminate all cases, and to sustain a zero-Covid state, would take enormous resources. This would produce diminishing returns as the number of cases goes down – and other aspects of life would suffer. We have seen this with countries attempting polio elimination, where routine health services may suffer, and with malaria elimination where the cost of averting each case rapidly increases as the number of cases goes down. Getting the number of cases down to manageable levels might eventually lead to zero cases temporarily, but we do not currently have effective measures to keep it at zero. In particular, border quarantines are not likely to be effective unless rigorously and universally applied with consequent disruption of all business travel, tourism and international trade. Border quarantine won’t be effective unless it is universal. Nick Ansell/PA Wire/PA Images Andrew Lee, reader in global public health at the University of Sheffield Elimination of Covid-19 in high-income countries is both possible and realistic. Ebola elimination was achieved in parts of Africa through disease control measures rather than a vaccine, including disease surveillance, infection control, changing social norms (for example around physical contact) and public communications. This demonstrates elimination is possible even in low and middle-income countries with fewer resources. The key determinants, as with all infectious disease control programmes, are the political and societal will to achieve this. Because it requires a multi-pronged approach, it needs resourcing, leadership and commitment to deliver. So the question becomes: “What are we prepared to pay or sacrifice to achieve this?” But in our interconnected globalised world it is not enough to eliminate the virus in just a few countries. Countries where the disease is endemic act as reservoirs of infection and can reinfect others. This is a global health threat that requires global leadership and coordinated action if we are to eliminate it. Angharad Davies, clinical associate professor at the Swansea University; Andrew Lee, reader in global public health at the University of Sheffield; Jimmy Whitworth, professor of international public health at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine; Lakshmi Manoharan, medical epidemiologist at the University of Oxford This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. UK News World News Politics Society Coronavirus Covid-19 Vaccines Lockdown vaccine #science_&_health
The Week UK
London · 1 hour ago
Instant Opinion: why was Britain last to ‘do the right thing’ on face masks?
Description Masked commuter in a near-deserted London Underground carriage Credits Getty Images Alt Text Tube, Underground, coronavirus Your guide to the best columns and commentary on Tuesday 14 July Reaction The Week Staff Tuesday, July 14, 2020 - 3:47pm The Week’s daily round-up highlights the five best opinion pieces from across the British and international media, with excerpts from each. 1. Sean O’Grady in The Independent on Britain being behind its neighbours... again Face masks make us all safer. So why was Britain, once again, the last to do the right thing? See related Do face masks protect against coronavirus? “There are downsides to this latest ruling from Boris Johnson that masks must be worn in shops, which are obvious. It makes social interaction weird, and it can feel a bit uncomfortable. But this is trivial compared with the role they play in reducing Covid-19 transmission rates, saving lives and boosting the economy. Like so much in this pandemic, it’s about individuals’ liberties being balanced against the impact on others. You can make your own mind up about the risks you take, but you should not make such judgements on behalf of others. Confidence is the key to restoring economic life: consumer confidence to spend, and business confidence to invest. If people feel safer (and indeed are safer) by wearing masks in shops, on public transport and in other indoor spaces, then the ruling will benefit us all.” 2. Hugo Rifkind in The Times on stomaching the risk of a commute What if we don’t want to go back to the office? “Masks, at any rate, aren’t going to get us back into offices. The question is, will anything? ‘Cultures are formed through shared working, which is in turn the basis of shared values,’ wrote Salma Shah for The Times yesterday, highlighting the eventual cost of us all staying at home. She was right. My trips to the office are to do with my new radio gig... but on a daily, newspaper basis I now work with formerly close colleagues whom I haven’t seen for four months. Our shared values, I hope, linger on but I do wonder whether, had we all always worked like this, they’d have been so easily forged in the first place. A bigger problem is the way that, as soon as vast numbers of people stop leaving the house, going to work and coming back again, often having bought at least a sandwich along the way, huge swathes of our cities simply cease to make any sense. Forgive my Londoncentricism, but parts of the capital paint the problem most starkly. Without tens of thousands of civil servants coming and going en route to Whitehall, Victoria looks like it has been hit by, well, a plague.” 3. Michelle Goldberg in The New York Times on Donald Trump’s pandemic incompetence In Some Countries, Normal Life Is Back. Not Here. “If you’re lucky enough to live in New Zealand, the coronavirus nightmare has been mostly over since June. After more than two weeks with no new cases, the government lifted almost all restrictions that month. The borders are still shut, but inside the country, normal life returned... And America? We had 68,241. As of last week, the worst per capita outbreak on the planet was in Arizona, followed by Florida. The world is closed to us; American passports were once coveted, but now only a few dozen nations will let us in. Lawrence O. Gostin, professor of global health law at Georgetown, told me he doesn’t expect American life to feel truly normal before summer 2022. Two years of our lives, stolen by Donald Trump.” 4. Mark Lowcock, UN under-secretary-general for humanitarian affairs, in The Daily Telegraph on a human tragedy more brutal than Covid’s health impacts The developing world faces a health, economic and security crisis that will dwarf the impact of Covid “Economic downturn, rising unemployment and reduced school attendance one year significantly increases the likelihood of civil war the next. Violent conflict drives famine and mass displacement. Based on current forecasts for food insecurity, refugee outflows could increase significantly. These problems might not be immediately apparent the way virus deaths are, but it is not hard to see that they are coming down the track. When they do materialise, it will be hard to explain why we did not act now. We can claim to have been taken by surprise by Covid-19, but we won’t be able to say the same of the development and security crises it is set to trigger. A call for money right now can be a difficult ask. But spending a little money now is a wise investment. It will save lives, protect decades of investment in development, and reduce the scale of the problems in the future.” 5. Dorothy Byrne, editor-at-large at Channel 4, in The Guardian on showing the truth about our past We can’t erase outdated TV shows, but we can hold their views to account “If much-loved characters in the past made homophobic comments or dressed up as people from other ethnic groups or pretended to be people who used wheelchairs, should we destroy that evidence of the social attitudes of the times? Cleaning up our past erases evidence of how views that we would now consider reprehensible were once normalised. Channel 4 is an anti-racist organisation with a particular remit to reach and reflect the lives of people from diverse backgrounds. But we are also committed to freedom of expression and being deliberately daring and controversial. There are bound to be moments when those principles come into conflict. There may be elements in our programmes which are so offensive that a public service broadcaster should not leave them on any platform.” UK News Europe US Middle East Africa South and Central Asia Media Science & Health Politics Society Coronavirus Covid-19 Lockdown Donald Trump poverty Child Poverty#world_news
Georgia Today
Tbilisi · 1 year ago
🎙 Oto Nemsadze, the Georgian contender of 2019 Eurovision Song Contest (ESC) released a video address and called on Georgian emigrants for his support. 👉🏼 “Greetings to Georgians living abroad. Let us support our country together. I will present Georgia at Eurovision this year and your support is very important. I will sing for you,” - Nemsadze said. 🎙 ESC 2019 will be held at Expo Tel Aviv, the city’s convention center; the show will consist of two semi-finals on 14 and 16 May, and the final on 18 May 2019. Oto Nemsadze, the Georgian contender of 2019 Eurovision Song Contest (ESC) will perform on stage in the first semi-final of the musical competition number 11 on May 14. He will perform the entry song “Keep on Going” on stage. ✅☝🏼Georgian emigrants will have to watch the public broadcaster of the country where they live. They will have to send Georgia’s number 11 to a special phone number. Twenty calls can be sent from one number.
The Week UK
London · 7 hours ago
Reaction: second Covid wave ‘could kill 120,000’ in UK this winter
Description Experts warn that preparations to avoid worst-case scenario in NHS hospitals ‘must start now’ Credits Leon Neal/Pool/AFP via Getty Images Alt Text NHS coronavirus Experts warn that preparations to avoid worst-case scenario in NHS hospitals ‘must start now’ In Depth Joe Evans Tuesday, July 14, 2020 - 10:17am Britain must begin “intense preparations” to avoid a second coronavirus spike that could claim up to 120,000 lives in a “reasonable worst-case scenario”, ministers have been warned. A new report from leading doctors and scientists says that unless urgent action is taken, infections could grow “out of control” and overwhelm the NHS this winter - when as The Guardian notes, “services are already stretched because of flu and other seasonal pressures”. The experts also predict that over the coming months, Britain’s R rate could rise from the current levels of between 0.7 and 0.9 to reach 1.7 in September, which “would likely see the UK go back into lockdown”, says Sky News. The 37 scientists and academics behind the report were commissioned by Patrick Vallance, the government’s chief scientific adviser, to model a “reasonable worst-case scenario” for Covid-19 this winter. They believe the peak in hospital admissions and deaths could come in January and February 2021. And the levels of fatalities projected “does not include deaths in the community or care homes”, the broadcaster adds. “A peak of coronavirus infection in the winter could be more serious than the one we’ve just been through,” report chair Stephen Holgate, a professor of immunopharmacology at the University of Southampton, told a press briefing. “We’re anticipating the worst, which is the best we can do.” See related Is Britain prepared for a second wave of coronavirus? Beijing coronavirus outbreak: what can we learn from China’s response to feared ‘second wave’? Reaction: UK tackling more than 100 coronavirus outbreaks a week, reveals Hancock The modelling was based on “the known impact of Covid-19 on healthcare resources, combined with that of flu and other seasonal infections, during a time when health services are often overstretched”, New Scientist reports. The researchers also “looked to the experiences of other countries, particularly what happened to the R number in US states that have recently eased lockdown restrictions”, the magazine continues. Based on their conclusions, the experts are calling “for a series of measures to prepare the NHS, including immediately reorganising social care services and increasing testing capacity”, says ITV News. Flu vaccinations must also be available for the vulnerable and health and social care workers, according to report chair Holgate. “With relatively low numbers of Covid-19 cases at the moment, this is a critical window of opportunity to help us prepare for the worst that winter can throw at us,” he added. Professor Azra Ghani, an infectious disease epidemiologist from Imperial College London who worked on the report, told Sky News that the findings are “not a prediction” but a “worst-case scenario”. “As we move into winter, the weather gets worse, people stay indoors more, windows aren’t open so the likelihood of transmission does of course increase,” she said. “We also have all sorts of other pressures on the NHS that increase during the winter and therefore extra admissions into hospitals.” A government spokesperson also emphasised that the report “represents a worst-case scenario based on no government action”. “We remain vigilant and the government will ensure the necessary resources are in place to avoid a second peak that would overwhelm our NHS,” the spokesperson said. Science & Health Coronavirus Covid-19 NHS#uk_news
Georgia Today
Tbilisi · 1 year ago
☝🏼 An education and science center will be built in Batumi as part of the government’s push to improve education across Georgia. ✅ The center will include laboratories, conference halls, sports facilities, recreational space, a library, science museum, outdoor stadium, and student halls. ✅ Education has become a priority for the current government. The project comes after the government announced plans to increase teachers salaries by 150 lari per month from September 2019 earlier this week.