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Georgia Today
Tbilisi · 1 year ago

☝🏼 American singer and actress, Miley Cyrus announced her new album ‘She Is Coming’ in George Keburia outfit.

The dotted blouse by the Georgian designer George Keburia is from Tbilisi Spring 2018 collection.

✅ Keburia’s clothes are characterized by the combination of the odd and attractive. His collections have been hailed as a vision of high-tech femininity. They are full of sharply constructed, precise pieces that were rooted in classic elegance, while still subversive enough to look strikingly cutting-edge. Apart from clothes, Keburia creates various accessories and sunglasses. Keburia’s tiny sunglasses are extremely popular among celebrities in the world - Rihhana, Kardashians, Pamela Anderson, Bella Hadid, Solange, etc have been wearing them.


Georgia Today
Tbilisi · 1 year ago
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The Week UK
London · 16 hours ago
Exclusive: Gucci teams up with Mytheresa
E-tailer joins forces with Gucci on capsule menswear collection One-Minute Read Felix Bischof Tuesday, July 14, 2020 - 11:17am Earlier this year, Mytheresa added menswear to its offering. As cooked up at its Munich base, the German luxury e-tailer's recipe for success has been two-fold: in addition to a list of approximately 120 international brands, Mytheresa issues special capsule collections, unveiled periodically and only available on the site. Since the January 2020 launch, marquee brands Bottega Veneta, Loro Piana and Fendi have sat next to independent makes (Raf Simons, The Elder Statesman and London menswear talent Martine Rose all feature) and special collections forged in partnership with the likes of Valentino and Thom Browne. For Mytheresa, Prada recently revisited some of 41 of its much beloved sportswear-infused designs from the early 2000s. So far, it's been a successful formula. "From day one we stood for luxury, timeless and modern fashion," says Chris Kyvetos, Mytheresa's Menswear Buying Director. Available from this week, Mytheresa's latest exclusive menswear capsule collection is in partnership with Gucci. "No other Italian label in history has been able to infiltrate mainstream culture like Gucci," Kyvetos enthuses. "At a time when fashion trends, fashion tastes and fashion priorities are changing so dramatically, we felt that Gucci was the best partner to send a true message." For Mytheresa, the Gucci team-up is marks the biggest collection it has issued to date, counting 47 designs in total across ready to wear clothing to accessories and footwear. Modelled by Australian electropop outfit Parcels in a campaign lensed by photographer Bella Lieberberg, the Roman fashion house's Mytheresa collection is heavy on 70s silhouetted tailoring cut from crinkle corduroy, two-tone yarn-dyed flannel and a bold windowpane pattern. Come for the classics: tasselled Gucci loafers fashioned from black, cognac or Bordeaux leather and accented with the brand's signature green-red-green Web and silk carres printed with nostalgic patterns.#fashion_and_jewellery
The Week UK
London · 16 hours ago
Exclusive: Gucci x Mytheresa
E-tailer teams up with Gucci on capsule menswear collection One-Minute Read Felix Bischof Tuesday, July 14, 2020 - 11:17am Earlier this year, Mytheresa added menswear to its offering. As cooked up at its Munich base, the German luxury e-tailer's recipe for success has been two-fold: in addition to a list of approximately 120 international brands, Mytheresa issues special capsule collections, unveiled periodically and only available on the site. Since the January 2020 launch, marquee brands Bottega Veneta, Loro Piana and Fendi have sat next to independent makes (Raf Simons, The Elder Statesman and London menswear talent Martine Rose all feature) and special collections forged in partnership with the likes of Valentino and Thom Browne. For Mytheresa, Prada recently revisited some of 41 of its much beloved sportswear-infused designs from the early 2000s. So far, it's been a successful formula. "From day one we stood for luxury, timeless and modern fashion," says Chris Kyvetos, Mytheresa's Menswear Buying Director. Available from this week, Mytheresa's latest exclusive menswear capsule collection is in partnership with Gucci. "No other Italian label in history has been able to infiltrate mainstream culture like Gucci," Kyvetos enthuses. "At a time when fashion trends, fashion tastes and fashion priorities are changing so dramatically, we felt that Gucci was the best partner to send a true message." For Mytheresa, the Gucci team-up is marks the biggest collection it has issued to date, counting 47 designs in total across ready to wear clothing to accessories and footwear. Modelled by Australian electropop outfit Parcels in a campaign lensed by photographer Bella Lieberberg, the Roman fashion house's Mytheresa collection is heavy on 70s silhouetted tailoring cut from crinkle corduroy, two-tone yarn-dyed flannel and a bold windowpane pattern. Come for the classics: tasselled Gucci loafers fashioned from black, cognac or Bordeaux leather and accented with the brand's signature green-red-green Web and silk carres printed with nostalgic patterns.#fashion_and_jewellery
The Week UK
London · 12 hours ago
Instant Opinion: why was Britain last to ‘do the right thing’ on face masks?
Description Masked commuter in a near-deserted London Underground carriage Credits Getty Images Alt Text Tube, Underground, coronavirus Your guide to the best columns and commentary on Tuesday 14 July Reaction The Week Staff Tuesday, July 14, 2020 - 3:47pm The Week’s daily round-up highlights the five best opinion pieces from across the British and international media, with excerpts from each. 1. Sean O’Grady in The Independent on Britain being behind its neighbours... again Face masks make us all safer. So why was Britain, once again, the last to do the right thing? See related Do face masks protect against coronavirus? “There are downsides to this latest ruling from Boris Johnson that masks must be worn in shops, which are obvious. It makes social interaction weird, and it can feel a bit uncomfortable. But this is trivial compared with the role they play in reducing Covid-19 transmission rates, saving lives and boosting the economy. Like so much in this pandemic, it’s about individuals’ liberties being balanced against the impact on others. You can make your own mind up about the risks you take, but you should not make such judgements on behalf of others. Confidence is the key to restoring economic life: consumer confidence to spend, and business confidence to invest. If people feel safer (and indeed are safer) by wearing masks in shops, on public transport and in other indoor spaces, then the ruling will benefit us all.” 2. Hugo Rifkind in The Times on stomaching the risk of a commute What if we don’t want to go back to the office? “Masks, at any rate, aren’t going to get us back into offices. The question is, will anything? ‘Cultures are formed through shared working, which is in turn the basis of shared values,’ wrote Salma Shah for The Times yesterday, highlighting the eventual cost of us all staying at home. She was right. My trips to the office are to do with my new radio gig... but on a daily, newspaper basis I now work with formerly close colleagues whom I haven’t seen for four months. Our shared values, I hope, linger on but I do wonder whether, had we all always worked like this, they’d have been so easily forged in the first place. A bigger problem is the way that, as soon as vast numbers of people stop leaving the house, going to work and coming back again, often having bought at least a sandwich along the way, huge swathes of our cities simply cease to make any sense. Forgive my Londoncentricism, but parts of the capital paint the problem most starkly. Without tens of thousands of civil servants coming and going en route to Whitehall, Victoria looks like it has been hit by, well, a plague.” 3. Michelle Goldberg in The New York Times on Donald Trump’s pandemic incompetence In Some Countries, Normal Life Is Back. Not Here. “If you’re lucky enough to live in New Zealand, the coronavirus nightmare has been mostly over since June. After more than two weeks with no new cases, the government lifted almost all restrictions that month. The borders are still shut, but inside the country, normal life returned... And America? We had 68,241. As of last week, the worst per capita outbreak on the planet was in Arizona, followed by Florida. The world is closed to us; American passports were once coveted, but now only a few dozen nations will let us in. Lawrence O. Gostin, professor of global health law at Georgetown, told me he doesn’t expect American life to feel truly normal before summer 2022. Two years of our lives, stolen by Donald Trump.” 4. Mark Lowcock, UN under-secretary-general for humanitarian affairs, in The Daily Telegraph on a human tragedy more brutal than Covid’s health impacts The developing world faces a health, economic and security crisis that will dwarf the impact of Covid “Economic downturn, rising unemployment and reduced school attendance one year significantly increases the likelihood of civil war the next. Violent conflict drives famine and mass displacement. Based on current forecasts for food insecurity, refugee outflows could increase significantly. These problems might not be immediately apparent the way virus deaths are, but it is not hard to see that they are coming down the track. When they do materialise, it will be hard to explain why we did not act now. We can claim to have been taken by surprise by Covid-19, but we won’t be able to say the same of the development and security crises it is set to trigger. A call for money right now can be a difficult ask. But spending a little money now is a wise investment. It will save lives, protect decades of investment in development, and reduce the scale of the problems in the future.” 5. Dorothy Byrne, editor-at-large at Channel 4, in The Guardian on showing the truth about our past We can’t erase outdated TV shows, but we can hold their views to account “If much-loved characters in the past made homophobic comments or dressed up as people from other ethnic groups or pretended to be people who used wheelchairs, should we destroy that evidence of the social attitudes of the times? Cleaning up our past erases evidence of how views that we would now consider reprehensible were once normalised. Channel 4 is an anti-racist organisation with a particular remit to reach and reflect the lives of people from diverse backgrounds. But we are also committed to freedom of expression and being deliberately daring and controversial. There are bound to be moments when those principles come into conflict. There may be elements in our programmes which are so offensive that a public service broadcaster should not leave them on any platform.” UK News Europe US Middle East Africa South and Central Asia Media Science & Health Politics Society Coronavirus Covid-19 Lockdown Donald Trump poverty Child Poverty#world_news
The Week UK
London · 1 day ago
Review: Lamborghini takes to the seas
Credits Lamborghini Alt Text Tecnomar for Lamborghini 63 The supercar maker has created an incredible new yacht for 63 lucky customers One-Minute Read Monday, July 13, 2020 - 3:32pm Lamborghini and yacht maker Italian Sea Group probably have many customers in common: “Both cater to people who have millions to spend on high-horsepower, limited-production luxury vehicles”, says Ezra Dyer on Car and Driver. So it made sense for them to collaborate on a limited edition superyacht, Lamborghini’s first venture into the sea and Tecnomar’s fastest vessel to date. Billed as the “Tecnomar for Lamborghini 63”, the yacht “combines a sporty silhouette with a nautical appearance”, says Miranda Blazeby on Boat International. “Other details include a hardtop inspired by Lamborghini’s sports cars, which provides protection from the elements while contributing to the yacht’s aerodynamic performance.” See related What is cancel culture? The 63 in the model name refers to the carmaker’s founding year, the boat’s 63-foot length and to the fact that only 63 will be made, selling for around £2.7m each. They are expected to be delivered in 2021 and clients will be able to choose from an extensive range of exterior colours and livery options, and from two interiors. Inspiration for the design came from the Lamborghini Sian FKP 37, the first Lamborghini destined for production that is powered by a hybrid engine, says Jeff Parsons in Metro. Like the car, the yacht is made from carbon fibre, making it extremely light, and the steering wheel and gauges in the cockpit are designed to look like the inside of a Lamborghini supercar – “even the starter button is identical”. Look closely and you will notice features taken from other models of Lamborghini’s past, including nods to its original supercar, the classic Miura. The performance is unmistakably Lamborghini too, says Rob Hull on This Is Money. The twin 24.2-litre V12 engines, which produce 2,000 horsepower and 4,794 lb ft of torque apiece, propel the boat to a top speed of 60 knots, or around 70mph – “enough to get you to your second home in Monaco in about the time it takes to mix a really good Martini”, says Parsons. This article was originally published in MoneyWeek Lamborghini#design_&_architecture
The Week UK
London · 1 day ago
Instant Opinion: Keir Starmer must offer more than ‘not being Jeremy Corbyn’
Your guide to the best columns and commentary on Monday 13 July Reaction The Week Staff Monday, July 13, 2020 - 2:20pm The Week’s daily round-up highlights the five best opinion pieces from across the British and international media, with excerpts from each. 1. Tom Harris in The Daily Telegraph on the first 100 days of the Labour leader After 100 days, Keir Starmer needs to offer voters more than ‘not being Jeremy Corbyn’ “The improvements he has made to his party’s – and his own – standing are real and important. That he has made mistakes along the way should hardly surprise anyone, although he needs to make fewer of them if he is to establish himself as a natural repository of anti-government support. Electorates have a nasty habit of making judgments about politicians in the very first few weeks of their tenure, and then refusing to reverse that judgment. The Covid lockdown may have given Starmer a longer period to bed in and might even allow him to have an effective relaunch on the other side of this crisis. From the perspective of a former member, Starmer represents a breath of fresh air for most Labour supporters after five fraught years. But a sense of relief won’t be enough for all those red wall voters, because – and I speak from experience – once you get out of the habit of voting Labour, it’s harder than you might expect to get back into it.” 2. Nesrine Malik in The Guardian in defence of those decried as ‘online mobs’ The ‘cancel culture’ war is really about old elites losing power in the social media age See related What is cancel culture? “Whenever I talk to people who are suddenly concerned about ‘cancel culture’ or ‘online mobs’, my first thought is always: ‘Where have you been for the last decade?’ I’ve been online long enough and, like many others, been receiving criticism and abuse online for long enough, to know that what some see as a new pattern of virtual censure by moral purists is mostly a story about the internet, not ideology or identity. If critics of ‘cancel culture’ are worried about opinions, posts and writings being constantly patrolled by a growing group of haters, then I am afraid they are extremely late to the party. I cannot remember a time where I have written or posted anything without thinking: ‘How many ways can this possibly be misconstrued, and can I defend it if it were?’ It’s not even a conscious thought process now, it’s instinct.” 3. Sean O’Grady in The Independent on the recovery of the British economy Forget global Britain - thanks to Brexit, coronavirus and a trade war with China, we’re losing our grip “There’s something heroic about Britain trying to chuck its weight around this way, and of course no one wants to do business with bullies and tyrants. But still, if the British economy is going to recover from the coronavirus-induced recession and go on to grow in the 2020s it will need its friends and its markets, and the British now seem to intent on blanking virtually everyone. The opportunities seem to be contracting rather than expanding. As everyone agrees, the UK is a great trading nation, and since before the industrial revolution has made its living from selling abroad, but the we don’t seem to be living up to the original hopes of ‘unleashing Britain’s potential’.” 4. John Prideaux, US editor of The Economist, in The Times on an abolitionist deserving of a pedestal A slavery statue we can all agree on: Frederick Douglass “On both sides of the Atlantic a great debate about statues is under way. So far the focus has mostly been on which lumps of bronze and marble should be removed by crane, or pushed into the harbour. There has been less discussion of what to do with all the empty plinths this creates. Yet putting up statues is fun. It is an opportunity to honour someone who should be universally admired and, therefore, to make a statement about what the society doing the putting up values. For those reasons Britain ought to have a statue of America’s greatest campaigner for the abolition of slavery, Frederick Douglass. Douglass had such an extraordinary life that the three autobiographies he wrote hardly seem sufficient.” 5. Nick Akerman, an assistant special prosecutor on the Watergate Special Prosecution Force, in The New York Times on the unfair fight set up for the special prosecutor Did Mueller Ever Stand a Chance Against Trump and Roger Stone? “From the start, Mr. Mueller was restrained by Justice Department regulations. He was barred, for example, from looking into the broader relationship between Mr. Trump and Russia through a review of Mr. Trump’s financial records and tax returns. Furthermore, according to the Mueller report, Mr. Trump made multiple attempts to fire the special counsel, and it is difficult, if not almost impossible, to conduct an investigation under those circumstances... Looking ahead, there needs to be a better mechanism in extraordinary circumstances - like Watergate and Russian interference in the 2016 election - that allows for the appointment of a truly independent special prosecutor. We were lucky to get the Mueller report, but Mr. Mueller was acting under restraints. Unfortunately history tells us that we will need special counsels in the years ahead, under extraordinary circumstances, and like we did with Watergate, that office should have true independence to protect our country and Constitution.” UK News US Russia Crime Science & Health Politics Society Law Keir Starmer Jeremy Corbyn Social media Boris Johnson Brexit slavery Donald Trump Russia US election 2016#world_news
Giorgi Gvajaia
Tbilisi · 1 year ago
Here's why Galaxy Fold displays are already failing There are two distinct issues here, and only one is particularly fixable. Read more 👇🏻 Problem 1: The screen's plastic covering looks removable This is the "fixable" problem. The Galaxy Fold, as every other foldable phone, has a plastic display on top of the OLED display that allows the entire screen to flex. We don't yet have flexible glass, so this is just how things are going to have to be for the foreseeable future. But the problem with that top layer on the Galaxy Fold is that it looks exactly like a pre-installed screen protector we've seen on phone after phone — including the Galaxy S10 — that you have the option of removing. On the Fold, though, the layer is not designed to be removed. It's not just inadvisable to do so, it's not meant to be removable. If you remove that top layer, you've effectively done the same as removing the cover glass from your Galaxy S10 — and, at that point, the display panel itself is going to fail. And it won't take long to do so. Samsung's messaging to early reviewers explicitly reminded us that the top layer of the screen was not removable and that it would compromise the integrity of the display. But even still, the urge to remove that top layer has been ingrained in all of us for over a decade — plastic doesn't feel right on a phone, and it looks like it's removable. Even some of the most egregious offenders of pre-installed screen protectors in the past would still technically allow you to remove the protector and have the phone work properly afterward. This just isn't the same case, even though it feels the same at first. So this part of the problem is fixable, but we don't know what Samsung plans to do about it. Let's remember that the Galaxy Fold is already up for pre-order, and will be shipping to regular consumers (albeit not in large numbers) with no hand-holding or extra information. They'll just get a phone in a box, and in the case of our retail-ready boxes there was not a single warning on the phone or packaging that mentioned you should not remove this top film. Pair that up with the intense desire to want to peel plastic from new phones, and you're set up for a bad news cycle of broken Galaxy Fold screens. Thankfully, proper retail boxes are supposed to have a small warning on the protective film covering the entire phone out of the box. And for as interesting of a news story it is for reviewers to see broken screens, customers that paid $2000 will take this a bit more seriously. It would behoove Samsung to make changes to its packaging and software to make it explicit as possible that the plastic should not be removed like any other phone — a single warning on the piece of plastic that people hastily rip off of every phone really isn't enough when the consequences are this serious. Problem 2: The screen is just fragile, period This is the bigger issue that Samsung inherently can't "fix" without years more development of the display technology that enables these phones to fold over and over again. So you shouldn't remove the top layer of the Galaxy Fold's display. We know this. But the fact that you can remove it (if you try hard enough) and simply doing that is enough to completely render the display useless and quickly broken is a bad sign. At least two of the reports of failed displays came while the Galaxy Fold's top layer was kept in place and undamaged, which points to the larger discussion of just how fragile the display technology is no matter what you do. Should this keep you from buying a Galaxy Fold?🤔 There are many reasons why you should be skeptical of parting with $2000 to buy a Galaxy Fold, well before any of these reports of screen failures arose. The durability and longevity of a flexible display was always going to be in question on these first-generation consumer foldable devices — we just didn't necessarily expect to see it start so spectacularly or so early. If you were hyped enough about the Galaxy Fold to want to place a pre-order, or at least see it in stores at the end of April before potentially buying, it would be a good idea to remind yourself of all of these sorts of problems that can be associated with a device that introduces a brand new form factor and so many new technologies. The Galaxy Fold is not a normal phone, and it's truly pushing the envelope in ways that we haven't seen in years; that's going to come with compromises, and you should know about them all before you decide to buy.
ამერიკის ხმა
Tbilisi · 1 week ago
თეთრი სახლი ამერიკის დაზვერვას ინფორმაციის გაჟონვაში ადანაშაულებს
შეერთებული შტატების პრეზიდენტის ადმინისტრაციას ისევ უწევს პასუხების გაცემა ე.წ. რუსულ ჯილდოსთან დაკავშირებულ კითხვებზე. რამდენიმე საინფორმაციო საშუალების მიერ გავრცელებული ცნობების თანახმად, ავღანეთში დისლოცირებული ამერიკელი ჯარისკაცების მოკვლისთვის, რუსეთის სამხედრო დაზვერვას თალიბებისთვის ჯილდო ჰქონდა დაწესებული. ამერიკის პრეზიდენტი დონალდ ტრამპი აცხადებს, რომ ამის შესახებ მისთვის არავის არაფერი მოუხსენებია. "დაზვერვამ ახლა მაცნობა, რომ ეს მათ სარწმუნოდ არ ჩათვალეს, შესაბამისად არ მოგვახსენეს მე ან ვიცე-პრეზიდენტს " - ასეთი იყო პრეზიდენტის განმარტება კვირას, 28 ივნისს გაკეთებული განმარტება. თუმცა, მას შემდეგ "ნიუ-იორკ თაიმსში" კიდევ ერთი პუბლიკაცია გამოქვეყნდა. სამშაბათს, 30 ივნისს, გაზეთი წერდა, რომ შეერთებული შტატების დაზვერვამ დააფიქსირა დიდი თანხების მოძრაობის ფაქტი. იმავე პერიოდში, თანხა რუსეთის სამხედრო დაზვერვამ თალიბანთან ასოცირებულ პირებს გადაურიცხა. თეთრი სახლის პრესმდივანი ინფორმაციის გაჟონვაში დაზვერვის ოფიციალურ პირებს ადანაშაულებს. კეილი მაკენანმა გუშინ თქვა, რომ "დაზვერვის თაღლითი ოფიცრები" გადაუმოწმებელი ინფორმაციით, ამერიკელი ჯარისკაცების სიცოცხლეს ადგილზე დამატებით რისკებს უქმნიან. White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany speaks to the press on June 30, 2020, in the Brady Briefing Room of the White House in Washington. McEnany also used her opening comments to berate The New York Times, which first broke the story about allegations Russia offered bounties to Taliban fighters to kill U.S. and coalition troops in Afghanistan. "There is no good scenario as a result of this,” she told reporters. "Who's g მაკენანმა "ნიუ-იორკ თაიმსიც" გააკრიტიკა, რომელმაც პირველმა გამოაქვეყნა აღნიშნული ინფორმაცია. "ეს კარგს არაფერს მოიტანს" - უთხრა თეთრი სახლის პრესმდივანმა ჟურნალისტებს. "ვის მოიუნდება შეერთებული შტატების დაზვერვასთან თანამშრომლობა? ვინ მოისურვებს იყოს წყარო ან თანამშრომელი, როცა იციან, რომ მათი ვინაობა შეიძლება გაამხილონ" - ამბობს კეილი მაკენანი. თეთრი სახლის კომენტარების პარალელურად, ვრცელდებოდა ახალი ცნობები იმის შესახებ, რომ პრეზიდენტმა იცოდა ამერიკელების მოკვლისთვის რუსეთის მიერ ჯილდოს დაწესებაზე. საინფორმაციო საშუალებები წერენ, რომ პრეზიდენტ დონალდ ტრამპს შექმნილ ვითარებაზე წლის დასაწყისში წერილობით მოახსენეს. Media outlets, including The New York Times and CNN, reported some of the information on the alleged Russian plot had been included in the Presidential Daily Brief, a daily summary of the top intelligence issues, in late February. Other reports suggest Trump was given written information about the matter earlier this year. “The idea that somehow he didn’t know or isn’t being briefed, it is a dereliction of duty if that is the case,” Biden said, while taking questions from reporters after a speech in Wilmington, Delaware. Americans should "conclude that this man isn't fit to be president of the& United States of America,” he added. Other top Democrats also voiced frustration following briefings at the White House with Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe, National Security Adviser Robert O’Brien and White House chief of staff Mark Meadows. “Very concerning to me was that their initial response was that they just wanted to make sure we knew that the president didn’t know anything,” House Armed Services Committee Chairman, Rep. Adam Smith, told reporters. “That’s actually not normal.” “Based on what we heard today, it was information that (a), the president should have known about and (b), based on what we were told today, he did,” Smith added. Other senior Democratic lawmakers also expressed concerns about the administration’s handling of the intelligence and specifically, its inclination to downplay the possible consequences. “Nothing in the briefing that we have just received led me to believe it is a hoax,” said House Democratic leader Steny Hoyer. Other Democrats said they were more concerned about what happens next. Minority Leader Charles Schumer (D-NY) talks to reporters on April 21, 2020 in Washington. "Instead of dithering about what he knew, what he didn't know, he should have a plan,” said Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer. "And above all, go after [Russian President Vladimir] Putin." Despite the criticism, the White House and some Republican lawmakers insisted the handling of intelligence suggesting Russian agents were offering to pay for the deaths of U.S. and coalition forces in Afghanistan was handled properly. "What is briefed to the president is when there's a strategic decision to be made," McEnany said. "In this case, it was not briefed to the president. … It was not credible." Sen. Jim Inhofe, the Republican chair of the Senate Armed Services Committee, agreed. “There’s some confusion as far as our own intelligence, and it just didn’t rise to the level of the president at that time," he said. “Our intelligence agencies aren’t in complete agreement on this, even now." In a statement late Monday, the top Defense Department spokesman said that while officials there were aware of the intelligence, the Pentagon “has no corroborating evidence” to back up the initial intelligence reports. Still, the Pentagon said it took additional precautions to protect troops. Other top intelligence officials also suggested the unverified intelligence was shared across the U.S. intelligence community and with allies whose troops were potentially at risk. Additional media reports say intelligence about the alleged plot had been sent to the White House last year and focused on an April 2019 car bombing that killed three Marines. Some officials say Trump often does not read his daily briefing and instead prefers oral briefings several times a week. McEnany said Trump has now been briefed on “what's unfortunately in the public domain." “The president does read, and he also consumes intelligence verbally," she added. "This president, I will tell you, is the most informed person on planet Earth when it comes to the threats that we face."#ახალი_ამბები#აშშ#პოლიტიკა
The Guardian UK
London · 19 hours ago
Will it destroy us? Why horror always creeps in to black drama
Michaela Coel’s I May Destroy You was a triumph, but a lifetime of seeing black characters suffer on screen made it hard to shake a feeling of dreadThe first time I noticed it was when Terry was walking home from the club. In the third episode of I May Destroy You, Michaela Coel’s character, Arabella, is high on drugs, and Terry – unable to get any sense out of her – decides to go home alone. She walks down the backstreets of Ostia in Italy. It’s dark, she’s stumbling while following Google Maps on her phone. The camera follows her from behind. Two men walk around a corner and do a double take. At that moment, I realised I’d started to grip the arms of my chair.Outside a bar, an Italian man begins to chat her up, and they end up dancing inside where another man notices her. My mind started to race. I remembered a New Yorker piece about girls from Nigeria being sex trafficked to Italy, and the stories black women have told me about the times men in southern Europe have approached them assuming they were prostitutes. The three dance together. There are what look like conspiratorial looks between the two men. Do they know each other? What’s going to happen to Terry? What comes next? Continue reading...#michaela_coel#culture #television_&_radio#race#world_news#atlanta#us_television#insecure#television
Artists Voyage
Tbilisi · 1 month ago
“It is the time you have wasted for your rose that makes your rose so important.”
On that story, the little prince, fell in love instantly with a rose in his asteroid. The little prince care so much to the rose. The rose with its thorns seems defenseless and susceptible- and yet, she shows off her thorns and puts on a superior attitude. But the rose’s vanity and demands cause the heartbreak of the little prince. And thus, he decided to leave its asteroid and the rose. “She cast her fragrance and her radiance over me. I ought never to have run away from her… I ought to have guessed all the affection that lay behind her poor little stratagems. Flowers are so inconsistent! But I was too young to know how to love her…” Just before the prince leaves, the rose said to it’s prince : “Of course I love you,” the flower said to him. “It is my fault that you have not known it all the while. That is of no importance. But you — you have been just as foolish as I. Try to be happy…” On his voyage to the earth, he come across a huge rose garden, and he realised that his roses were not the only one in the universe. “There might be millions of roses in the whole world, but you’re my only one, unique rose.” On the movie adaptation, the rose is the reason why the prince come back to its asteroid even though it’s too late that the rose has dead. “. . . One sees clearly only with the heart. Anything essential is invisible to the eyes. . . . It’s the time that you spent on your rose that makes your rose so important. . . . You become responsible for what you’ve tamed. You’re responsible for your rose. . . .” The story was telling a beautiful story of love. As the rose, we may take the love that’s being given as granted, and thus, we forgot to ’taking care’ of the love itself. And as a little prince, we may need to go around the world to realise that our rose is the only one because ‘anything essential is invisible to the eyes…’ Even though the rose is being portrayed in the story as a vain, foolish, frail, and naïve creature, the little prince loves that rose. Nothing ever goes away until it teaches us what we need to know.#littleprince #rose #fox #art #love Tbilisi
Taia Khekhelashvili
Gori · 2 months ago
ფილმი, რომელიც სიყვარულზე უფრო ღრმად დაგაფიქრებს - Her (2013)
IMDB - 8.0 Director: Spike Jonze Quotes from the movie Theodore: Sometimes I think I have felt everything I'm ever gonna feel. And from here on out, I'm not gonna feel anything new. Just lesser versions of what I've already felt. Theodore: Dear Catherine, I've been sitting here thinking about all the things I wanted to apologize to you for. All the pain we caused each other. Everything I put on you. Everything I needed you to be or needed you to say. I'm sorry for that. I'll always love you 'cause we grew up together and you helped make me who I am. I just wanted you to know there will be a piece of you in me always, and I'm grateful for that. Whatever someone you become, and wherever you are in the world, I'm sending you love. You're my friend to the end. Love, Theodore. Theodore: Well, the room's spinning cause I drank too much, cause I wanted to get drunk and have sex. There was something sexy about that woman... cause I was lonely... maybe just cause I was lonely. I wanted somebody to fuck me. I want somebody to want me to fuck them. Maybe that would have filled this ti-... tiny little hole in my heart, but probably not... and sometimes I think I have felt everything I'm ever gonna feel, and from here on out I'm not gonna feel anything new... just... lesser versions of what I've already felt. Theodore: I don't know what I want, ever. I'm just always confused. She's right, all I do is hurt and confuse everyone around me. I'm mean, am I just... Am I... You know, Catherine says I can't handle real emotions.#Movie #World #Her #art #photo
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