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Davit Samkharadze
Tbilisi · 1 year ago

Seems interesting


Davit Samkharadze
Tbilisi · 1 year ago
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Keso Bigvava
Tbilisi, Georgia · 1 month ago
Does Anyone Else Keep Dreaming About Their Ex During Lockdown?
No-one wants to unexpectedly bump into an ex – even in a dream. Spare a thought, then, for those whose former partners seem to have taken up permanent residence in their subconscious since the outbreak of Covid-19. Sound familiar? You’re not alone. “Since lockdown began, a lot of us have had a lot more time on our hands, and this is causing some serious introspection about ourselves and our interpersonal relationships,” dreams expert Lauri Loewenberg tells British Vogue. “I’m finding the dreaming of an ex scenario to be an interesting byproduct of this... it’s particularly prevalent for people who are not currently in a relationship.”#lockdown #relationships #life Tbilisi
Davit Samkharadze
Tbilisi, Georgia · 1 year ago
არ ვიცი რა დავპოსტო ჰო და რაზეც ნერვები მეშლება ხშირად იმას დავწერ RATOM AR AGHEBEN AVTOBUSIS MDZGHOLEBI UKANA KAREBS ???!!!???!!?
Keso Bigvava
Tbilisi, Georgia · 3 months ago
A letter to the UK from Italy: this is what we know about your future
The acclaimed Italian novelist Francesca Melandri, who has been under lockdown in Rome for almost three weeks due to the Covid-19 outbreak, has written a letter to fellow Europeans “from your future”, laying out the range of emotions people are likely to go through over the coming weeks. I am writing to you from Italy, which means I am writing from your future. We are now where you will be in a few days. The epidemic’s charts show us all entwined in a parallel dance. We are but a few steps ahead of you in the path of time, just like Wuhan was a few weeks ahead of us. We watch you as you behave just as we did. You hold the same arguments we did until a short time ago, between those who still say “it’s only a flu, why all the fuss?” and those who have already understood. Coronavirus: the week explained - sign up for our email newsletter Read more As we watch you from here, from your future, we know that many of you, as you were told to lock yourselves up into your homes, quoted Orwell, some even Hobbes. But soon you’ll be too busy for that. First of all, you’ll eat. Not just because it will be one of the few last things that you can still do. You’ll find dozens of social networking groups with tutorials on how to spend your free time in fruitful ways. You will join them all, then ignore them completely after a few days. You’ll pull apocalyptic literature out of your bookshelves, but will soon find you don’t really feel like reading any of it. You’ll eat again. You will not sleep well. You will ask yourselves what is happening to democracy. You’ll have an unstoppable online social life – on Messenger, WhatsApp, Skype, Zoom… Advertisement You will miss your adult children like you never have before; the realisation that you have no idea when you will ever see them again will hit you like a punch in the chest. Old resentments and falling-outs will seem irrelevant. You will call people you had sworn never to talk to ever again, so as to ask them: “How are you doing?” Many women will be beaten in their homes. You will wonder what is happening to all those who can’t stay home because they don’t have one. You will feel vulnerable when going out shopping in the deserted streets, especially if you are a woman. You will ask yourselves if this is how societies collapse. Does it really happen so fast? You’ll block out these thoughts and when you get back home you’ll eat again. You will put on weight. You’ll look for online fitness training. You’ll laugh. You’ll laugh a lot. You’ll flaunt a gallows humour you never had before. Even people who’ve always taken everything dead seriously will contemplate the absurdity of life, of the universe and of it all. You will make appointments in the supermarket queues with your friends and lovers, so as to briefly see them in person, all the while abiding by the social distancing rules. You will count all the things you do not need. The true nature of the people around you will be revealed with total clarity. You will have confirmations and surprises. Literati who had been omnipresent in the news will disappear, their opinions suddenly irrelevant; some will take refuge in rationalisations which will be so totally lacking in empathy that people will stop listening to them. People whom you had overlooked, instead, will turn out to be reassuring, generous, reliable, pragmatic and clairvoyant. Those who invite you to see all this mess as an opportunity for planetary renewal will help you to put things in a larger perspective. You will also find them terribly annoying: nice, the planet is breathing better because of the halved CO2 emissions, but how will you pay your bills next month? You will not understand if witnessing the birth of a new world is more a grandiose or a miserable affair. You will play music from your windows and lawns. When you saw us singing opera from our balconies, you thought “ah, those Italians”. But we know you will sing uplifting songs to each other too. And when you blast I Will Survive from your windows, we’ll watch you and nod just like the people of Wuhan, who sung from their windows in February, nodded while watching us.#Many of you will fall asleep vowing that the very first thing you’ll do as soon as lockdown is over is file for divorce. Many children will be conceived. Your children will be schooled online. They’ll be horrible nuisances; they’ll give you joy. Elderly people will disobey you like rowdy teenagers: you’ll have to fight with them in order to forbid them from going out, to get infected and die. You will try not to think about the lonely deaths inside the ICU. You’ll want to cover with rose petals all medical workers’ steps. You will be told that society is united in a communal effort, that you are all in the same boat. It will be true. This experience will change for good how you perceive yourself as an individual part of a larger whole.#italyItaly
Giorgi Gvajaia
Tbilisi, Georgia · 1 year ago
Sorry tourists, Amsterdam doesn't want you anymore❌👇🏻 (CNN) — Famous for its tolerance as much as its narrow houses and broad canals, Amsterdam is undergoing a radical change of attitude when it comes to the millions of tourists that flock to see it each year. Tolerance, it seems, has reached its limits in the Dutch capital, which is now actively urging visitors to head elsewhere as frustrated locals complain of feeling besieged by visitors using the city's bicycle-thronged streets as a travel playground. "The pressure is very high," says Ellen van Loon, a partner at Dutch architectural firm OMA who is involved in adapting the city for the future. "We don't want to turn into a Venice. The problem we are currently facing is that Amsterdam is so loved by tourists, we just have so many coming to the city." While Van Loon acknowledges the positive aspects of tourism, which earns the Dutch economy around 82 billion euros ($91.5 billion) a year, like many locals she's worried that soaring visitor numbers are destroying the soul of this vibrant cosmopolitan city. Like Venice and other destinations across Europe, Amsterdam has become a byword for overtourism -- a phenomenon closely linked to the rise in cheaper air travel that has seen visitors flood certain places, often spoiling the very spot they came to enjoy. While some cities are still formulating ways to cope, Amsterdam -- where a decade-long surge in visitor numbers is forecast to continue, rising from 18 million in 2018 to 42 million in 2030, or more than 50 times the current population -- has simply decided it's had enough. CNN Travel's Richard Quest meets Reinier Sijpkens on board his musical boat. Netherlands tourist officials recently took the bold decision to stop advertising the country as a tourist destination. Their "Perspective 2030″ report, published earlier this year, stated that the focus will now be on "destination management" rather than "destination promotion." The document also outlines the country's future strategy, acknowledging that Amsterdam's livability will be severely impacted by "visitor overload" if action isn't taken. Solutions listed include working to dissuade groups of "nuisance" visitors by either limiting or completely shutting down "accommodation and entertainment products" aimed at them, as well as spreading visitors to other parts of the Netherlands. Some of these measures have already come into play. Last year, the famous "I amsterdam" sign was removed from outside the Rijksmuseum, the city's main art gallery, at the request of the city of Amsterdam, as it was "drawing too big of a crowd to an already limited space. Measures have also been taken to discourage travelers from visiting some of Amsterdam's seedier tourist hotspots. Earlier this year, the city government announced it will end tours of the Red Light District in central Amsterdam, citing concerns that sex workers are being treated as a tourist attraction. One of Amsterdam's most famous residents, Anne died in a concentration camp in 1945 at the age of 15. "We pride ourselves on being a city which is tolerant. A city where people can be themselves, which is true," says museum director Ronald Leopold, one of the guardians of Anne's diary and legacy. "But we also have these dark pages, and these are probably the darkest." According to Leopald, around half of the 1.3 million people who visit the Anne Frank House each year are under the age of 30. "I think it's increasingly important to learn about what happened here during World War II and the Holocaust," he adds. Like many other locals, architect Van Loon fears that Amsterdam, which came in 23rd place on Euromonitor International's report on the Top 100 City Destinations in 2018, is dangerously close to losing its unique allure forever. "The reason tourists come here is because there's something in the character of Amsterdam they love," she explains. "But at a certain point, when the amount of tourists is increasing and increasing, they actually kill what they loved in the first place."
Artists Voyage
Tbilisi, Georgia · 1 month ago
“It is the time you have wasted for your rose that makes your rose so important.”
On that story, the little prince, fell in love instantly with a rose in his asteroid. The little prince care so much to the rose. The rose with its thorns seems defenseless and susceptible- and yet, she shows off her thorns and puts on a superior attitude. But the rose’s vanity and demands cause the heartbreak of the little prince. And thus, he decided to leave its asteroid and the rose. “She cast her fragrance and her radiance over me. I ought never to have run away from her… I ought to have guessed all the affection that lay behind her poor little stratagems. Flowers are so inconsistent! But I was too young to know how to love her…” Just before the prince leaves, the rose said to it’s prince : “Of course I love you,” the flower said to him. “It is my fault that you have not known it all the while. That is of no importance. But you — you have been just as foolish as I. Try to be happy…” On his voyage to the earth, he come across a huge rose garden, and he realised that his roses were not the only one in the universe. “There might be millions of roses in the whole world, but you’re my only one, unique rose.” On the movie adaptation, the rose is the reason why the prince come back to its asteroid even though it’s too late that the rose has dead. “. . . One sees clearly only with the heart. Anything essential is invisible to the eyes. . . . It’s the time that you spent on your rose that makes your rose so important. . . . You become responsible for what you’ve tamed. You’re responsible for your rose. . . .” The story was telling a beautiful story of love. As the rose, we may take the love that’s being given as granted, and thus, we forgot to ’taking care’ of the love itself. And as a little prince, we may need to go around the world to realise that our rose is the only one because ‘anything essential is invisible to the eyes…’ Even though the rose is being portrayed in the story as a vain, foolish, frail, and naïve creature, the little prince loves that rose. Nothing ever goes away until it teaches us what we need to know.#littleprince #rose #fox #art #love Tbilisi
My Vision
Tbilisi, Georgia · 2 months ago
You'll never find a rainbow if you're looking down
What is life? Surely this question has baffled many of us and the answer seems to be lost in the abyss. Every person has his/her own ideas, beliefs, and opinions about the great mystery that is life. But has anyone ever found out what it really means? It’s not that only adults ask this question to themselves or people around them. These days, even young adults and teenagers have a tough time making sense. But, no matter what your dilemma is, in answering this question, there are those who have tried to point some fascinating things about life. Would you like to read about it? Then here are some quotes you’d love to read. There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle. ~ Albert Einstein Being happy doesn’t mean that everything is perfect. It means that you’ve decided to look beyond the imperfections. ~ Gerard Way Watch your thoughts; they become words. Watch your words; they become actions. Watch your actions; they become habits. Watch your habits; they become character. Watch your character; it becomes your destiny. ~ Frank Outlaw
Giorgi Gvajaia
Tbilisi, Georgia · 1 year ago
ჰოლანდიურმა ავიაკომპანია KLM-მა სამგზავრო თვითმფრინავის კონცეფცია წარმოადგინა, რომელიც პრინციპულად ახლებური მიდგომაა დიზაინისადმი ავიაინდუსტრიაში👉🏻 The new aircraft design was conceived by designer Justus Benad and is being further realized by a team of researchers at the Netherlands’ Delft University of Technology, per CNN. The look of the aircraft is clearly different from the start, ditching the typical cylindrical tube main fuselage for a “squat slice of pizza” look that extends the body through the wings of the plane. This beefed-up core holds passengers, fuel and cargo, and through this distribution, which improves the aircraft’s overall aerodynamics, the plane will manage to be 20% more fuel-efficient versus the Airbus A350, which carries approximately the same amount of passengers depending on its configuration. A savings of 20% in fuel consumption may not seem like much, but over time, and at scale, it could potentially make a huge difference — especially if the pace of electric aircraft development and other alternatives doesn’t pick up. That said, timelines for deployment aren’t super immediate: These could enter service sometime between 2040 and 2050 based on the current development schedule, which isn’t exactly tomorrow. Testing an all-new design for passenger jets, which basically look like they did when they were first introduced, is obviously not something one undertakes lightly, however. The good news is that the team is hoping to put a scale model into real-world flight testing later this year.
Keso Bigvava
Tbilisi, Georgia · 3 months ago
The Best Offer
"Human emotions are like works of art. They can be forged. They seem just like the original, but they are a forgery. Everything can be faked. Joy, pain, hate... illness, recovery. Even love." The Best Offer (2013) 🎬🥀#moviefeed
Irakli Sokhadze
Tbilisi, Georgia · 3 months ago
Seems legit 😁✌#coronavirus
Middleeast Report
Tbilisi, Georgia · 3 weeks ago
თურქეთის ინტერესები ლიბიაში
So what is Turkey interested in Libya? • Two military bases (Watiya, Misrata) • Oil, gas exploration, drilling • Running oil facilities • Repairing banking system • Reconstruction • Building power plants, re-establishing basic services • Unifying the local tribes#ახალიამბები #პოლიტიკა #news #politics #libya #turkey #civil #war #military #base #opinion #middleeast #africa #ახლოაღმოსავლეთი #აფრიკა